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Short thoughts that have caused breakthroughs - Page 3

post #61 of 81
Release
Redirect
Re-engage
post #62 of 81
Square to the skis

or

Get rid of the counter
post #63 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sidecut
Square to the skis

or

Get rid of the counter
:
There must be two trains of thought on this! My prefered style is to face the direction I'm travelling in as I make long GS-type turns (except in moguls, when I face downhill), but I recently took a lesson while on some short-turning skis. It was "keep your upper body and shoulders square to the fall line" as your skis went back and forth accross it. The same lesson also involved a lot of going up and down, specificaly upweighting to release the skis at turn initiation, instead of just biting in with the new edge. I generally prefer to stay low (semi-tuck) and tip the skis to the desired turn angle and carve away. I don't know, but the lesson seemed to be a step backwards.

Anyone care to elaborate on these two "schools" of skiing.
post #64 of 81
I have to agree with Ghost. Seems to me "getting rid of counter" promotes upper body rotation, flat skis, skidding, no edge engagment and everything else that goes along with no separation of the upper and lower bodies.

I still ski and will continue to ski with a strong inside half, extended outside leg and hip angulation. I just try to keep tip lead to a minimum and make sure my shoulder position matches my tip lead.

Maybe I'm all wrong. It wouldn't be the first time.
post #65 of 81
I wear different "hats" when I ski.

If I take a lesson I try to do what the instructor is asking, and sometimes practice it afterwards. I can ski different ways. Some of these ways are a lot of work.

I can concentrate on unweighting, setting edges, springing back and forth in short-swing turns, with boddy facing the fall line. I don't normally ski this way, but it's not hard to do. I can concentrate on making long smooth carves, keeping my edges pressed and and raising no "dust" (spray? rooster tail?). Or I can concentrate on leaving railway tracks on the hill. Or I can think about jamming my edges into the snow and snapping my old RC4s into a tight high-g corner off a pile of snow. Usually when I'm not trying to do something specific, I just think about what shape I want my edges to be in and where I want to put them to direct my path.

What I find the most fun is parking my brain and just letting go of all the thought and skiing as fast as my skis want to run, going wherever fancy takes me without thinking about how I'm doing it.
post #66 of 81
Edge, pressure, steer.

It's old but I still use it.

Also: engage the tips.
post #67 of 81
Be serene and not heard.
post #68 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
:
My prefered style is to face the direction I'm travelling in as I make long GS-type turns (except in moguls, when I face downhill), but I recently took a lesson while on some short-turning skis. It was "keep your upper body and shoulders square to the fall line" as your skis went back and forth accross it. The same lesson also involved a lot of going up and down, specificaly upweighting to release the skis at turn initiation, instead of just biting in with the new edge.
1.There is no longer unweighting in skiing.

2. In short radius turns it is obviously necessary to have a counter and stay squatre to the fall line, I was speaking of more medium and long turns.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arby
I have to agree with Ghost. Seems to me "getting rid of counter" promotes upper body rotation, flat skis, skidding, no edge engagment and everything else that goes along with no separation of the upper and lower bodies.

I still ski and will continue to ski with a strong inside half, extended outside leg and hip angulation. I just try to keep tip lead to a minimum and make sure my shoulder position matches my tip lead.

Maybe I'm all wrong. It wouldn't be the first time.
In the ancient times, Counter was good becasue it was thought that the muscles that were tensioned while countered were effective in helping to bring the skis around once the edge was released. That's not necesary anymore. Put the ski on edge and it will turn.

There is nothing about lack of Counter that promotes turn initiation through rotation of the upper body. There is nothing about lack of counter that promotes flat skis , lack of edge engagement or anything else you mentioned. Innfact the opposite is true. Stand up, now counter. Are your feet all of a sudden up on edge? And how are you trying to keep tip lead to a minimum without reducing your counter?
post #69 of 81
sosteer by pointing your knees in the direction you want to go and for you racers out there, you dont have to take the panel to the face to have a fast line. make your skis point directly downhill next to the gate. A strong start is very important. Finish your turn with perfect timing. Dont ski directly at the gate, but just above it.
post #70 of 81

your body is a pendulum

make your lower body swing back and forth like the pendulum on a clock. your upper body is perfectly still, but you lower body makes smooth arcs back and forth. apply this to slalom skiing and you will be a very smooth, rhythmic skiier.
post #71 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sidecut
And how are you trying to keep tip lead to a minimum without reducing your counter?
Ah yes, I am all for reducing counter and staying squarer to the skis. Like I mentioned, I try to match my shoulder position to the amount of tip lead I have.

You are the one that posted earlier "get rid of" counter. Getting rid of and reducing are not the same thing.
post #72 of 81
Tip, grip and rip
Let the mountain be your teacher
post #73 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arby
Ah yes, I am all for reducing counter and staying squarer to the skis.
\
But then by your analysis you are skidding on flat skis etc. so why are you reducing it?

I think you summed it up perfectly when you said:

"Maybe I'm all wrong."
post #74 of 81
You are the one who sounds confused.

I never said I was skidding a flat ski. I ski with some tip lead, counter and hip angulation remember? All used to eliminate skidding. IF in fact you are skidding and riding a flat ski, you probably wouldn't want to reduce it. That's the whole point.

You are the one writing one thing, and I guess meaning another.
post #75 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arby
Seems to me "getting rid of counter" promotes upper body rotation, flat skis, skidding, no edge engagment and everything else that goes along with no separation of the upper and lower bodies.
If getting rid of this would cause what you are talking about then reducing it would effect it also so why would you be trying to reduce it?
post #76 of 81
What we are talking about reducing is the counter used in "ancient times", as you mentioned earlier. "Modern" counter is in fact reduced, not totally "gotten rid of". At least the way I define counter, i.e. upper body facing slightly to the outside of the turn.

We have discussed in detail on this forum why "lots" of counter is no longer necessary. That I totally agree with. You mentioned "getting rid of", which I'm pretty sure means zero, zip, none whatsoever. If no counter whatsoever has caused you a breakthrough and is a valuable tip that will improve my skiing, I'd like to here why.
post #77 of 81
Keep your hands out in front like fists. This is a quick way to regain control/balance if you suddenly get out of whack, and it promotes fast turns and pole plants automatically.

When skiing slush/crud, a tighter parallel allows the downhill ski to "plow" a path for the uphill ski, and it makes life real easy. Less chance of skis wandering around.

Trees, bumps, narrow chutes -- aim for the opening/path/line and commit to it, ignoring the obstacles.

Craig
post #78 of 81

Read through this and just noticed last post was in 2005 - great bunch of tips in here.

 

Wondering if there are any new ones that have come up in the nine years since the last post...

post #79 of 81

Nice thread resurrection!!! Ive been working on my release. I used to have a big up unweight. With lessons and help from here I now think about releasing my edges by reducing ankle flexion and not reducing knee flexion

post #80 of 81
Stay in the box (the area between the toe piece and heel piece of your binding).
Skiing is a downhill sport, flow like water downhill and eliminate moves that project you up and back.
post #81 of 81

The problem with skiing is your head is trying to kill you. The problem with short thoughts is thinking general tactics work in specific situations. You are usually better off with a general plan, just be ready to change as the situation warrants.

 

For skiing bumps; When in doubt turn. AKA traversing means trouble 

 

A good skier is a lazy skier, If you stand in the right place the hill and the skis will do all the work (sometimes it's a whole lot of work to stand in the right place however)

 

Skiing is incredibly easy if you just stay ahead of your feet. AKA  If you're chasing your feet you're in trouble.

 

I find skiing is a very positive sport, you have to look where you want to go, not where you don't want to go.

 

And my favorite,  Shut up and ski!  Works as a reminder when I'm teaching to say as little as I can because you learn to ski by skiing not listening, it also lets me know (as per my first comment) when moving I should shut off my head and listen to my feet. 

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