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PSIA - W Level II skiing tasks (long)

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
In the process of going over our tasks for Level II in a clinic and thinking about all the discussions going on I decided this might be a good thing to post.

Last season when I took my LIII clinics a hand out was given to the candidates that included the LII and LIII tasks. (I'll post the LIII tasks in another post) The list included how the tasks would be scored so there would be little suprise when the scores were given.

Here are the LII tasks (from 2003-04) and how they would be scored.

Traverse done well (could be a pure carve traverse or a "targeted" traverse (straight line))

1. Appropriate flex in all joints.
2. Upper body poised and stable, slightly countered.
3. Skis leave a narrow track
4. Lead change is appropriate for slope.
5. Edges are engaged in the snow.

Scoring:
7 = All technical elements, flawless execution
6 = Most technical elements.
5 = No major problems

Traverse Problems

1. Out of balance, awkward stance.
2. Upper body faces skis.
3. Upper body out of balance.
4. Unequal edging.
5. Stance too narrow.

Scoring:
3 = Any technical problems.
2 = Two or more problems.
1 = Shows many problems.

Skating Done Well

1. Good athletic stance.
2. Solid edging skills
3. Can roll from inside to outside edge or vice versa.
4. Upper body active but stable
5. Use of arms and hands do not effect balance
6. Center of mass travels forward

Scoring:
7 = All technical elements, flawless execution
6 = Has most technical elements.
5 = Has three technical elements.

Skating Problems

1. Out of balance.
2. Difficulty moving from foot to foot.
3. Weak edging skills, difficulty finding an edge.
4. Arm and hand activities take the upper body out of position.
5. Center of mass travels upwards not forward.

Scoring:
3 = Any technical problems.
2 = Two or more problems.
1 = Shows many problems.

Leapers done well.

1. Good athletic stance.
2. Solid edging skills = platform.
3. Leap comes from activity in ankles.
4. Lands balanced and softly.
5. Consistent turn shape.
6. Leap is done at the initation of the turn.
7. Both skis are off the snow.

Scoring:
7 = All technical elements, flawless execution
6 = Has most technical elements.
5 = Has a few technical elements.

Leapers Problems.

1. Weak platform to leap from.
2. Leaps with use of whole body.
3. Tails or tips stay on the snow.
4. Leaps at other parts of turn.
5. Inconsistent turn radius.

Scoring:
3 = Any technical problems.
2 = Two or more problems.
1 = Shows many problems.
post #2 of 25
Thread Starter 

Demos/free skiing

From my score card in April 2003.

Beginning Wedge Christie (demo)
Advanced Wedge Christie (demo)
Basic Parallel (demo, These are skidded soft edges)
Moderate Bumps.
Moderate Steeps.

The assigned movements are in the first post and are combined as a single score.

Scoring for skiing is 1-7. (might have changed this year) and no 4's Maximum score of 84. 48 is a passing score.

This is over 2 days and with 2 examiners.
post #3 of 25
dchan, can you describe a "leaper" please?
post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 
Leapers are a "hop" or "leap" at the transition of your turn. They show an edge change with the CM moving down the hill. Depending on the examiner they may ask for a slight rotary movement while in the air or no rotary. There should be no "displacement" sideways up hill or down.

see this thread
post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 
Since there are a lot of people taking their level II in other divisions, Does anyone have the tasks/requirements from the other divisions?

DC
post #6 of 25

PSIA-RM skiing maneuvers

While I could copy them in here, the PSIA-RM maneuvers are listed in this PDF document from the PSIA-RM site (available to everyone).

Fundamental maneuvers
  • Wedge christie
  • Basic parallel
  • Linked RR turns
  • Linked hockey slides
  • (alternate: hockey stop)
Application maneuvers
  • Linked short turns in bumps
  • Variable terrain and snow conditions
  • Medium radius performance turns on smooth terrain
  • Switch skiing (basic parallel)
post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 
Just talked with one of my examiners (Ted Pitcher) from last season.

Got the low-down on where these descriptions came from.

This part was authored by Carl Underkoffler

The assigned tasks for 2004-2005 have not changed for Level II although there may be variations in the tasks. ie: skating up hill, in a traverse, straight down a fall line.
Leapers with some turn down the fall line, Targeted traverse/pure carved traverse, etc..
post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 
Bump..

Do any of the examiners here have more insight on what examiners are looking for in our free skiing. How are we being scored?
post #9 of 25
Interesting that I saw a sheet for PSIA-RM's scoring that one of the candidates had at my recent level II exam. I do not know where he got it, but it listed the scores on a per-category basis. It seems like it would be very useful information to have!
post #10 of 25

PSIA-E Level II skiing

From: http://www.psia-e.org/AlpineExamGuide.pdf

Level II Skiing

Skiing will be tested and evaluated through four categories of skiing activities:

Selected Skiing Tasks
Tasks will be done on moderate terrain. They may be done using a variety of formats i.e. call down, pairs skiing, line rotation, etc. Candidates should be prepared to ski any of the activities listed below.
  • Short radius turns in fall line – maintain constant speed and radius
  • Medium radius turns – maintain constant speed and radius
  • Free runs
  • Lane change – five short turns, change on the 5th turn (width of a grooming lane)
  • Medium/Short/Medium (ski an hourglass)
  • Short/Medium/Short
  • Medium radius turns – moderate speed to VERY slow speed, back to moderate
  • Short radius turns accelerating OR decelerating
  • Traverse – weight basically even; uphill knee and hip slightly forward
    1. traverse from point A to point B – maintain a straight line
    2. ride the natural sidecut of the ski

Level II Reference Maneuvers
  • Skating/stepping/tracking maneuvers
  • Wedge Turns
  • Spontaneous Christies – vary the turn radius, speed, terrain
  • Open Parallel – vary the turn radius

Bumps

Candidates must be able to ski any intermediate bumps. The focus will be on accuracy and speed control, so as to be able to lead students down the terrain.

Versatility
  • Falling leaf – alternating diagonal sideslipping
  • Ski only on the inside ski – make only slight direction changes on easy terrain; maintain functional alignment of body parts
  • Skate down the fall line (on easy terrain)
  • Stem christies
  • Open parallel turns – NO poles
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
The new format for both L2 and L3 exams is now a module system

The skiing module is held first. 3 days of hard skiing. The skiing module allows the examiner/trainer to ski with the candidates and coach the candidates all the way through the process. During the 3 days they will evaluate your skiing including several assigned tasks. They can however coach you during the process so if the candidate is having a hard time with one legged skiing for instance, the examiner may make some suggestions to try .... then let them work on that for a little bit. They would probably then come back to the task later in the 3 days to see if there was an improvement and if it was enough to pass.

There is no longer a "prep clinic" for level 2 or 3 so if you pass the skiing portion, you are given a go ahead to continue to the next step.

The next step would be a take home written exam which now includes an essay portion. (not absolutely sure what this is but I suspect they will give you a scenario to evaluate and develop a plan). You would present the written exam at the teaching module where you will do your MA and teaching portion of the exam.

The great part about this is if you don't pass the skiing portion, you will know where you are in your skiing. Since there is feed back allowed and they tell you before you leave the 3rd day there is no wondering if your skiing was up to snuff. And since feedback and coaching is allowed, pass or fail, you still hopefully will come away with a great learning experience.
post #12 of 25
Who decided that traverses should be done with counter?

What ever happened to "efficient" non-silly skiing?

Picturing myself in a real life traverse without the intention to make a turn in the near future, using counter seems to be a way to tire myself out.

I understand this is meant as some sort of testing criterium, but what do you learn from watching someone traverse in an unnatural fashion that you can't learn from watching them ski in a variety of other non-silly ways? More importantly, what does this skill do for the student?
post #13 of 25
I am not PSIA certified. I am, however, CSIA certified (Canada). I will take a lucky guess to suppose that the reason for requiring instructors to demonstrate traverse with slight counter-rotation is because this is an important exercise to help skiers get the feeling of counter-rotation and to feel the pinch in their downhill hip. I doubt very much at level II that the point is to teach someone how to traverse across the bowl. Its an exercise that leads to feeling certain things that leads into better linked turns. Just my 2 cents.
post #14 of 25
Yeah I get that, my question is why its necessary to test for such a thing when it should be illustrated in the skiing as is...and why in such an unnatural thing should be emphasized.
post #15 of 25
I can't argue with you there. They didn't do anything like that in levels I-III of Whistler CSIA that I can remember. Certainly not as part of passing certification...we may have done some drills like that. I'm just starting to investigate what it will take to get my PSIA certification. From what I'm gathering..it seems like there are a number of rather static exercises..which must serve some purpose..but seem an awful lot like parlor tricks. For example, this traverse, or skiing on one ski, etc..
post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
I don't know where you get the idea that the traverse is with "counter". It does say slightly countered. If you are on a side slope, and usually the traverse task is on a pretty steep hill in the order of a steep blue often with some bumps, skiing this traverse with no counter would be take effort and be less efficient.

I would suspect they want to see an appropriate amount of counter for the conditions that they put the candidate in. If it's a very steep hill, there will be some counter just because of the way the feet would have to move. If it is a very flat crossing, then the amount of counter would be much less.
post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 
The traverse (either straight or fully carved) shows the candidate's ability to manage edge angles and control rotary movements in very minute amounts.

The tracks left behind should show even weight on both skis, no skidding, and an even spacing between the two.

If you think you can do this by being very static, Guess again.
post #18 of 25
yep, I can see your point. When I think about it..I'm sure I instinctively counter a bit whenever I am traversing any kind of steep slope.
post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 
also doing some of these tasks at slow speeds really points out the flaws in one's skiing. Speed tends to mask some of the errors in our skiing.

DC
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
also doing some of these tasks at slow speeds really points out the flaws in one's skiing. Speed tends to mask some of the errors in our skiing.

DC
There is something I can fully understand and appreciate. Trying to make skis work well and pretty at very low speed is illuminating for sure.
post #21 of 25
From my experience at my L3 exam and a lot of clinics since then, is that the traverse is actually a carved one-ski traverse on the uphill ski. The traverse is done by starting on both skis then lifting the downhill ski. They do NOT want to see you just lift your downhill foot. They want you to rise and slightly counter on the uphill foot. The reason for the counter is that it allows your anatomy to edge the uphill ski better and keep the carve. You must maintain the carve on the uphill foot. When you create the counter, it's from the hip socket. If you do this and your downhill foot/leg is relaxed, your dowhill tail will be crossing your uphill tail, just a couple of inches above it. For the exercise, it wasn't required that your tails were crossed, but it was required that your hips were countered. It is possible and acceptable to rotate the downhill femur so that the skis stay parallel, but it's not real comfortable. If you do this move corectly, it's VERY easy to traverse the hill locked on your uphill edge.

A year ago I skied with Mike Rogan for a week at the Eastern Master's Academy. He is an amazing carver. We did a lot of one footed skiing, making pure carves. When the foot he was on became his uphill foot, the tail of the outside (lifted) ski would crossover the tail of his inside foot. When you emulate this, it becomes amazingly easy to make pure carves on only the inside ski, as well as it becomes a lot easier to adjust the edge angle and turn radius.

When most people ski on one foot, and the ski that's on the snow is the uphill/inside ski, they tend to bank a LOT. This move fixes that.

edit: my apologies. This thread is regarding the L2 exam tasks. I was referring to a L3 task.
post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
bumo
post #23 of 25

whtmt

Skiingman: The reason for testing candidates to ski a traverse with an appropriate amount of counter is because it does two key things: First, without a skiers stance maintaining an appropriate amount of counter, based on the slope angle, anatomically the skier's stance will exhibit a stronger edge engagement.

This is due to the pelvis being twisted to the inside of the slope along with the inside leg, hip, shoulder, and arm leading through the traverse. The key reason that this position is stronger then being square to the skis is that when the hip is twisted to the inside the femur can't move outward and release the lower leg to let the ski flatten as easily and lose its edge engagement.

The second key point is that this position sets the skier up at the ready for the next upcoming turn. Since the the outside foot, leg, femur, hip, shoulder, and arm are all behind or not leading, it is easier to release the edge when extending the inside ski and actively softening or releasing the outside ski into the new turn.

If you do a traverse with your feet, legs, hips, and shouders square to the skis you will find that the tails can wash out much more easily on a packed or harder snow.

So here's a static exercise to do with a friend.

Stand in a traverse with both skis parallel in a functionally open stance. Then twist your torso so it faces downhill, to the outside of the traverse. Keep your outside ski, leg, hip, and shoulder slightly behind your inside ski, leg, hip, and torso. Now place your two poles together and hold them parallel in line with the outside or downhill ski, while twisting your torso to face downhill.

Have your friend also stand in a traverse below and facing you, grasping your poles with two hands, one at each end, and try to pull you down the slope. As you edge you should be able to resist his/her pull by creating a strong inside half by moving your hip to the inside of the traverse or up the the hill creating a stronger edge engagement (ie-higher edge angle) all while he/she pulls in the opposite direction.

Now do everything the same with your partner, but be sure that you feet, knees, legs, hips, and torso are square to your skis, while you hold onto the poles. Now try to resist again. This time you may find that you can't hold the edge nearly as well, since the hip is rolled to the outside, which allows the outside leg femur to rotate even further and then the edge angle begins to lessen and the edge then slips.

I hope this helps you to find the answers to your question when you go back out on snow. Good luck with it.

whtmt & Mackenzie 911
post #24 of 25

whtmt

Skiingman: The reason for testing candidates to ski a traverse with an appropriate amount of counter is because it does two key things: First, without a skiers stance maintaining an appropriate amount of counter, based on the slope angle, anatomically the skier's stance will exhibit a stronger edge engagement.

This is due to the pelvis being twisted to the inside of the slope along with the inside leg, hip, shoulder, and arm leading through the traverse. The key reason that this position is stronger then being square to the skis is that when the hip is twisted to the inside the femur can't move outward and release the lower leg to let the ski flatten as easily and lose its edge engagement.

The second key point is that this position sets the skier up at the ready for the next upcoming turn. Since the the outside foot, leg, femur, hip, shoulder, and arm are all behind or not leading, it is easier to release the edge when extending the inside ski and actively softening or releasing the outside ski into the new turn.

If you do a traverse with your feet, legs, hips, and shouders square to the skis you will find that the tails can wash out much more easily on a packed or harder snow.

So here's a static exercise to do with a friend.

Stand in a traverse with both skis parallel in a functionally open stance. Then twist your torso so it faces downhill, to the outside of the traverse. Keep your outside ski, leg, hip, and shoulder slightly behind your inside ski, leg, hip, and torso. Now place your two poles together and hold them parallel in line with the outside or downhill ski, while twisting your torso to face downhill.

Have your friend also stand in a traverse below and facing you, grasping your poles with two hands, one at each end, and try to pull you down the slope. As you edge you should be able to resist his/her pull by creating a strong inside half by moving your hip to the inside of the traverse or up the the hill creating a stronger edge engagement (ie-higher edge angle) all while he/she pulls in the opposite direction.

Now do everything the same with your partner, but be sure that you feet, knees, legs, hips, and torso are square to your skis, while you hold onto the poles. Now try to resist again. This time you may find that you can't hold the edge nearly as well, since the hip is rolled to the outside, which allows the outside leg femur to rotate even further and then the edge angle begins to lessen and the edge then slips.

I hope this helps you to find the answers to your question when you go back out on snow. Good luck with it.

whtmt & Mackenzie 911
post #25 of 25

whtmt

Skiingman: The reason for testing candidates to ski a traverse with an appropriate amount of counter is because it does two key things: First, without a skiers stance maintaining an appropriate amount of counter, based on the slope angle, anatomically the skier's stance will exhibit a stronger edge engagement.

This is due to the pelvis being twisted to the inside of the slope along with the inside leg, hip, shoulder, and arm leading through the traverse. The key reason that this position is stronger then being square to the skis is that when the hip is twisted to the inside the femur can't move outward and release the lower leg to let the ski flatten as easily and lose its edge engagement.

The second key point is that this position sets the skier up at the ready for the next upcoming turn. Since the the outside foot, leg, femur, hip, shoulder, and arm are all behind or not leading, it is easier to release the edge when extending the inside ski and actively softening or releasing the outside ski into the new turn.

If you do a traverse with your feet, legs, hips, and shouders square to the skis you will find that the tails can wash out much more easily on a packed or harder snow.

So here's a static exercise to do with a friend.

Stand in a traverse with both skis parallel in a functionally open stance. Then twist your torso so it faces downhill, to the outside of the traverse. Keep your outside ski, leg, hip, and shoulder slightly behind your inside ski, leg, hip, and torso. Now place your two poles together and hold them parallel in line with the outside or downhill ski, while twisting your torso to face downhill.

Have your friend also stand in a traverse below and facing you, grasping your poles with two hands, one at each end, and try to pull you down the slope. As you edge you should be able to resist his/her pull by creating a strong inside half by moving your hip to the inside of the traverse or up the the hill creating a stronger edge engagement (ie-higher edge angle) all while he/she pulls in the opposite direction.

Now do everything the same with your partner, but be sure that you feet, knees, legs, hips, and torso are square to your skis, while you hold onto the poles. Now try to resist again. This time you may find that you can't hold the edge nearly as well, since the hip is rolled to the outside, which allows the outside leg femur to rotate even further and then the edge angle begins to lessen and the edge then slips.

I hope this helps you to find the answers to your question when you go back out on snow. Good luck with it.

whtmt & Mackenzie 911
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