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fixing a damaged edge

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I hit a huge rock, and theres some nice damage to my edge for about six inches. The edge is still intact, but its very very rough and looks a little jagged.

Im thinking I just take a diamond stone and work it in that area, and then file it a little bit, and then diamond stone again.

or maybe use a gummi stone at first, and then file?
post #2 of 9
I would suggest hitting it first with a grey or red gummi stone. Grey is very abraisive and will round an edge very quickly. Red is pretty soft but should do the trick as well. You want to break down the case hardened edge burrs first as if you file or diamond stone over the hardened edges, it will kill both file and diamond stone

file the base edge and side edge until it's relatively sharp without completely killing the edge. deburr, polish, and you should be set. unfortunately, aside from cutting and replacing the edge, it's near impossible to remove deep dings from the edges w/o killing the ski and its effective lifetime.

melloboy
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Spent a good hour on one little section of edge. It doesnt look much better. Im just gonna bring it to the shop
post #4 of 9
The first tool used to flatten a burr is a 'deburring stone'. A burr from rock damage is heat hardened steel and will wear out a diamond stone and file prematurely. Once the burr is knocked down, then hit with a file and then diamond. Use gummis to desharpen edges or remove rust.
post #5 of 9
Deburring is the part of removing the jagged parts of an edge after you have sharpened the edges using a file. Trying to fix an edge that has been damaged by rocks is different. Once the edge is hit with a rock and the heat has hardened the edge, the best tool to get the hardened part filed away is the diamond stone. The diamond sote is the most abrasive resistance tool you have. Once you have removed the case hardening part you can use a file.
post #6 of 9
Norefjell,
I have always been told that while diamond is the hardest material, that if you try to deburr with a diamond stone, the burrs will actually pull the diamonds out of the diamond stone, rendering it useless....could you clarify this? thanks [img]smile.gif[/img]

melloboy
post #7 of 9
Melloboy:

I have not heard of that before. However, given the quality of some of the diamond stones I have seen, I can see how that could happen. A long time ago I picked up a set of high quality diamond stones that I still use. In search for "bargains" I have at times picked up diamond stones from discount tool outlets and really got stuck with some junk. As to the first step of edge tuning, the ski technicians that I have learned from all taught me to feel the edge for rock damage and case hardening. If found, they all used a diamond stone to smoothen out this area prior to filing. But I am getting old, and maybe my tuning techniques are outdated?
post #8 of 9
"As to the first step of edge tuning, the ski technicians that I have learned from all taught me to feel the edge for rock damage and case hardening. If found, they all used a diamond stone to smoothen out this area prior to filing."

Me too. You do not have to use a lot of pressure. Just use a coarse enough stone and then a finer one.
post #9 of 9
Hello Melloboy,

The diamond abrasive material is glued to the carrier, the problem is while diamonds are hard the glue is not, so pressing too hard can result in the glue releasing.

As I recall, Tognar carry a little warning somewhere in their catalog about pressing too hard with diamond files.

Regards,
UK2TX2CA
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