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Is sliding rails bad for skis?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I just got a new pair of twin tips, and I'd like to try some rails and boxes and the like. The only thing I'm worried about is, even though I know these types of skis are made for these activities, does it damage the base at all? I don't wan't to do it if it does. Thanks!
post #2 of 16
well steel is a lot harder then fresh powder! You won't be doing your new skis any favors but if you only ride the rails every now and then, then you will be fine. Also one thing to consider is how good of a condition the rails and boxes in the park are. If they are well kept and not all beat up then your skis will suffer less damage.
post #3 of 16
The rails will do more damage to the edges than to the PTex. It also depends on how consistent you are. If you slide a fail (edit: I meant rail, but that was probably a bit Freudian for me!) in the same place every time (which is obviously what you hope to do), it'll do more damage.
post #4 of 16
"I know these types of skis are made for these activities," nope they are marketed for those activities skis are still skis and yes rails will damage them...
post #5 of 16
Steel edges on steel rails = grinding. Essentially, you grind the edges against the rails. Hence, there's no way to ride rails without damaging the edges of the skis.

That said, all things are relative. If you derive joy from rail-riding, then perhaps the damage to your edges is a small price to pay.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Nope, I think I'll stick to jumps and the slopes. Thanks!
post #7 of 16
If regular snow dulls your edges---What do you think skiing on steel will do to them ?

Go have fun................. and on the rails use some "el-cheapos" you can find on e-bay. Run your "new used" boards over a belt grinder once and don't think about it again......End of season ?
Sacrafice to Ullr.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tennisets
I just got a new pair of twin tips, and I'd like to try some rails and boxes and the like. The only thing I'm worried about is, even though I know these types of skis are made for these activities, does it damage the base at all? I don't wan't to do it if it does. Thanks!
Yes it does damage the base.

But hey, so does skiing on an unwaxed base - and that doesn't stop 90% of people from doing just that. It's amazing how much base burn you see when you start to check out other people's bases.

If you're planning on using the skis for mostly park stuff anyways, then you're likely not going to notice slightly dulled edges. If you plan on taking them into the steeps or whatever...that's a different story...
post #9 of 16
Duh? Uh, yeaah!
post #10 of 16
I believe it is armada that is making their park skis with rounded edges under the foot for rails.
Maybe Tanner can race The Birds of Prey on those...
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'm not using them for mostly park, I spend much more time out of the park than in it, actually. I was just curious what rails are like, but I definitely don't want do any damage to the skis, since I don't want to decrease performance on the slopes I ski most often. Thanks for the help!


Oh, and when I bought the skis, the guy in the store said that the skis are pre-waxed from the factory. Should I get them waxed anyway? I've only skied on them one day so far.
post #12 of 16
You might want to find a PVC rail first. Since it's plastic the damage is minimal - just watch the edge angle so you don't shave the top off the tube. The interesting thing about metal or plastic rails is that they are much more slippery than you would expect (when sliding with your skis perpendicular to your direction of travel) - yes, even more than snow.

Everybody leans back their first time resulting in the classic banana peel slip. You almost need to lean forward on the front foot until you get comfortable and can 50/50 the weight between your legs. It's very counterintuitive.

If you can, and don't want to damage your skis, find a short PVC rail near the ground. With only your boots and poles (for balance), stand on the rail at mid-sole. When you're ready, lift you poles off the snow and turn your upper body towards the end of the rail - looking at the end. You will slide. Eventually you will be able to make it to the end, balanced and confident. The sliding resistance is about the same with skis. Your feet should be slighty more than shoulder width with knees bent and your arms away from the sides of your body - classic gorilla stance.

Just add skis.
post #13 of 16
My son is averaging two pair of twin tips a year do to the large amount of steel edge that literally disappears. The skis literally seem to melt away under the centerline and collapse. the pvc idea is a good one for practice but know that the fiberglass in pvc will also deplete and scratch the steel and base materials just not as quick. if your in to the rails to compete have at it if your looking for props from those around you spend your time practicing on one ski (the foot of your choice) no poles and you'll be admired then!
post #14 of 16
Bad for legs too. My kid had a compound fracture at Copper two years ago on the Rails.
post #15 of 16
actually, the steel on steel or PVC on steel action actually polishes the edges much like a diamond stone. You can also apply wax to hte rail and then you're actually waxing the base as you slide!

Same logic people have when they ski into the parking lot, I imagine....
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tennisets
I'm not using them for mostly park, I spend much more time out of the park than in it, actually. I was just curious what rails are like, but I definitely don't want do any damage to the skis, since I don't want to decrease performance on the slopes I ski most often. Thanks for the help!


Oh, and when I bought the skis, the guy in the store said that the skis are pre-waxed from the factory. Should I get them waxed anyway? I've only skied on them one day so far.
some here will tell you to always wax skis, fresh from the factory or no. for most uses, though, a factory wax will be fine and re-waxing is redundant. how long the wax lasts is dependent on what type of snow you're skiing on and how you're skiing. hard snow combined with high-speed gs turns will strip wax off much faster than skiing in powder or fresh snow...best way is to check the bases. if you look at it now, it's probably still a healthy, deep black color. when you start to see whitish color, usually along the edges first, then you know you need to wax. that's base burn, or oxidation.
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