or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Resorts, Conditions & Travel › Safety bars on lifts -- none at Alta -- why?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Safety bars on lifts -- none at Alta -- why? - Page 5

post #121 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post
I was thinking I might have something to add to this discussion, when I realized I already had. In 2005, shortly after the second Bush inauguration.
Bush who? There was a second inauguration?
post #122 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncle crud View Post
Paula's Ski Lovers.com is where you need to go. this discussion is probably a love-fest over there.

I'm afraid that DEDICATED SKIERS for the most part don't give a flying fork about safety bars -- whether they're there, or not, it doesn't matter because the lift is a mere inconvenience that must be suffered to be back atop the mountain again.

if you fear falling off a lift, quit skiing. it's that simple.
Yea... only pussies where helmets too!

If you fear crushing your skull, quit skiing!



The arrogance and stupidity in this thread is a sad representation of the ski community. Safety features should not be belittled and labeled unnecessary by those who feel a false sense of security. Having safety bars does nothing to hinder your ski experience and I would much rather you have the choice NOT to use a safety bar than there not to be safety bars on a lift.

The fact is, accidents happen, lifts get jolted, people slip, etc.... safety bars can prevent that, especially for children, and even if the statistics are not in overwhelming favor there is no question that they make many beginners, children, and people with a fear of heights more comfortable on the lift.

It's these kind of absurd attitudes that have consistently given the ski community a bad name.
post #123 of 140
I don't really care for the safety bars and usually find it annoying if someone lowers it without asking. Skiing itself is inherently dangerous and safety bars are my least concern. Besides, they don't call it the wild west for nothing!
post #124 of 140
post #125 of 140
I'm really glad someone has finally opened a thread on this. Hey, what do you guys think about these new, "wide" skis? I say they suck.
post #126 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiking4 View Post
Lech is for rich people with fur coats. Altabird is a real skiers mountain, so they are more laid back and don't upgrade their lifts as much as Austria. Also, the Alps are mostly below treeline resulting in some very cold weather sometimes.



Alta also is skiers only. That gets rid of all the boarders.
Let me count the ways...
-Lech is for rich people. No rich people at Alta, right? Didn't like William F Buckley have a house there?
-Altabird is a real skiers mountain so they are more laid back and don't upgrade their lifts as much as Austria. So, presumably, lifts at real skiers' mountains never get upgraded? So what do they do, buy them used so they're old from the get-go? So is Verbier not a real skiers' mountain? What about Whistler? Guess Jackson Hole is a gaper hill now that they've updated the tram.
-The Alps are mostly below treeline resulting in some very cold weather sometimes. It's actually pretty warm in the Alps compared to the northern Rockies. Don't have data, but I've skied colder days at Alta than here. Don't even want to talk about Montana.
post #127 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiking4 View Post
Lech is for rich people with fur coats. Altabird is a real skiers mountain, so they are more laid back and don't upgrade their lifts as much as Austria. Also, the Alps are mostly below treeline resulting in some very cold weather sometimes.
yep, fur coats and below treeline
post #128 of 140
I assumed he meant above treeline.
post #129 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by brave ulysses View Post
Yea... only pussies where helmets too!

The arrogance and stupidity in this thread is a sad representation of the ski community.
Just had to point out the irony here.
post #130 of 140
OK, been following this thread for days. I'm a pro-bar guy, probably because I ski with my kids. I've got nothing to add on the merits, but wanted to report that having considered the points of the anti-bar skiers, I've now added to my short list of skiing courtesies:
Beginning of lift ride: "OK we if we lower the bar?" (no one EVER says "no".)
Near end of lift ride: "Shall we raise the bar?"

So easy. Puts people in a friendly mood, and no cost to me.

FWIW, my other standard skiing courtesies are:
If someone has fallen next to/in front of me on the slope: "You OK?"
In the base lodge lunch place:
"Are these seats taken? Can we share your table?"
"Are you going to eat those fries?" (just kidding)

This might be a good topic for a separate thread: What are the easy courtesies that can help us get past the "crowd" part of skiing with the least amount of friction so we all can enjoy the fun part?
post #131 of 140
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post
This might be a good topic for a separate thread: What are the easy courtesies that can help us get past the "crowd" part of skiing with the least amount of friction so we all can enjoy the fun part?
There you go again. Getting practical. Here I was so enjoying the anti-bar people making themselves look silly and you go right to the heart of the matter: courtesy in pulling down the bar!

Well done!
post #132 of 140
It's really strange that people willingly engage in a sport which involves riding a chairlift dozens of feet off the ground, yet they do absolutely nothing to get over their irrational fear of heights.

I don't really care either way - none of the places I ski have security blankets on the lifts so it's a moot point with me, but it just strikes me as kinda silly. Like getting into surfing but being completely terrified of water.

Do any of you safety bar death-graspers hate cold weather as well?
post #133 of 140
I will not tolerate anyone being anti-bar. Won't tolerate it. If you prefer to do your drinking at home, that's your business. But leave the rest of us alone.
post #134 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by topwater View Post
yep, fur coats and below treeline
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post
I assumed he meant above treeline.
Yes LOL. Sorry for the error. I think you can put the French and Swiss Alps as 80% above tree line?
post #135 of 140
I can't believe I'm getting into the substance on this!

Jer,

Just because someone likes the bar down on the lift doesn't mean they're afraid of heights. I go on the lift to get to the top so I can ski. Skiing is fun, and so I accept the risk that goes with it. I find no particular fun in riding the lift -- no fear either, but I wouldn't buy a lift ticket just to ride the lift. So why take on even a little extra risk, and possibly increase (even if only slightly) the chance that I won't get to continue doing what I came (and paid good money) for: skiing.

By the same reasoning, when I'm walking in the parking lot at a ski resort, I look both ways so I don't get hit by a car. Why? Not because I'm scared of parking lots, but because walking in the parking lot is not what I came to the ski resort for. I also wash my hands before eating at the ski base lodge, but that's different: I am scared of e.coli.

In any case, as I said in my previous message, this and the other threads on this topic has sensitized me on being courteous to others on the lifts.

Jim
post #136 of 140
Oh - I'm the most courteous guy you could ever find. Like I said - I don't have to worry about the bar 'cause there aren't any at the places I ski. If I ever did ski at some place that has bars, I wouldn't mind people lowering them at all. But that wouldn't stop me from believing they have a psychological problem.

Has anybody actually heard of a bar definitively saving somebody from falling off a lift? Believe what you want, but I'd guess the vast majority of the people out there who absolutely need the bar down NOW are terrified of heights. If you're seriousely comming at this from a safety-only angle, I hope you ski in a motorcycle helmet and full body armor because the chances of you getting plastered by an out of control skier (or even skiing into a lift tower) outweigh the chances of you falling off a lift by about 90%.

In closing, I 'd like to say that you do know that a great deal of what I say here I say just to get people going, don't you?
post #137 of 140
Jer,

I know, but your posts are thought-provoking so keep 'em coming.

I agree that there are some out there who seem fine with skiing but have lift fear. Last year at Smuggs an instructor on the chair in front of me had to talk his chair partner out of a panic.

I also agree that the whole risk thing can get carried away: why don't we all just stay in our houses wrapped in bubble wrap? People here (non-skiers) sometimes bite their tongues when I tell them that I ski -- like, what's wrong with this guy, he seems otherwise so rational?

Best,
Jim
post #138 of 140
I read the first, and last pages of the thread, so forgive me if this has been mentioned, but:

I skied Baker for the first time, which has no bars. I asked a patroller on the lift if anyone ever falls off, and he said "yes, several times per year". Evidently one little kid fell 30 feet and bounced, yet jumped up after just a few minutes. Others have been hurt more seriously.

I grew up in Europe, and am definitely pro-bar. I'll ride up without the bar, but prefer it down.
post #139 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
Oh - I'm the most courteous guy you could ever find. Like I said - I don't have to worry about the bar 'cause there aren't any at the places I ski. If I ever did ski at some place that has bars, I wouldn't mind people lowering them at all. But that wouldn't stop me from believing they have a psychological problem.

Has anybody actually heard of a bar definitively saving somebody from falling off a lift? Believe what you want, but I'd guess the vast majority of the people out there who absolutely need the bar down NOW are terrified of heights. If you're seriousely comming at this from a safety-only angle, I hope you ski in a motorcycle helmet and full body armor because the chances of you getting plastered by an out of control skier (or even skiing into a lift tower) outweigh the chances of you falling off a lift by about 90%.

In closing, I 'd like to say that you do know that a great deal of what I say here I say just to get people going, don't you?
How the hell would you like someone to provide a statistic of how many people have NOT fallen because of the presence of a bar? Seriously, are you thinking straight? Do you see the problem with your questions and arguments?

You might say things to get people going, but it would be a lot more impressive if it didn't make you sound stupid.
post #140 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by brave ulysses View Post
How the hell would you like someone to provide a statistic of how many people have NOT fallen because of the presence of a bar? Seriously, are you thinking straight? Do you see the problem with your questions and arguments?

You might say things to get people going, but it would be a lot more impressive if it didn't make you sound stupid.

Well - looks like it got you going, doesn't it dummy?

It's impossible to provide any kind of statistic of how many people have NOT fallen because of safety bars. Do you see the problem with your questions and arguements?

Oh - BTW genius - I'm not "argueing" against safety bars. I'm just saying that it's funny that so many people who participate in a sport where they have to ride a chairlift way up high are afraid of heights. Maybe if you'd settle down a bit you'd be able to comprehend that.

Hey - you want the security blanket down? That's great - I'm not gonna stop you. But I'm still gonna think you have a psychological problem. And that's really the point of this whole discussion. I don't think anybody here is gonna forcibly refuse anybody who wants the bar down. But there are a whole lot of people (you, for example) that really really care what everybody thinks about them. This isn't about lowering a bar - it's about your fear of being percieved by others as somebody with a psychological problem. A probelem that (like most irrational phobias) they could probably overcome if they tried.

There's two things you can do: get some help and overcome your fear or stop getting all worked up about how others percieve you. Hey - nobody's perfect.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Resorts, Conditions & Travel
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Resorts, Conditions & Travel › Safety bars on lifts -- none at Alta -- why?