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About Colisions.....

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I always hear people on this forum talk about themself coliding with somebody or having a very near miss. I don't recall ever running into anybody or having a near colision since i've been skiing. (I started at age 5) Does anybody else not hit people besides me, because it seems like a lot of people around here do.......
post #2 of 19
I can't recall ever hitting anybody but came really close once. I was doing a freestyle exibition thing at lineup time, did a step over and my buckles locked together and I was headed right for all my fellow Instructors standing at lineup. I managed to shoot through the line at a small opening with my feet crossed parallel turn. That's the closest I've come.

NOW getting hit---That's a whole 'nother deal. I got hit on average 1-2 times a year when I was teaching, but never enough to cause any injury. Well, not to me anyway.
post #3 of 19
I have actaully only been hit twice. Once by some rogue 7 year old flying down the hill in a tuck, which hurt more than you would think! and than most recently this year, a snowboarder cut me off and sat down directly in my path. I ran into him, was ejected from my skis, and flew over his head. HE was at least very apologetic, and kept telling me he was sorry for cutting me off. My knee/thigh were black and blue for two weeks though!
post #4 of 19
EaglesFan: The law of averages are stacking up against you. By my reckoning, you have 42 collisions coming your way.

Seriously, getting side-swiped on the slope is a way of life. There's nothing you can do about it. It's a bit like getting T-boned in a car.

However, you also have choices.

Once, when I was young and dumb, I almost killed a guy on the slope. I was screaming around a narrow corner at mach schnell speed, and he was standing there - kicking snow off his boot. Had I hit the man, he would have died.

As it was, I instinctively veered to left into a grove of trees, flying at 40 mph. I slammed into the trunk of a tree, lost my spleen and crushed my left elbow (still has limited movement). Instant Karma! I was lucky to live.

So, yes, it does happen. There's lots of dumb kids (my former self) and out-of-control fools out there. Beware!
post #5 of 19
I'm pretty sure I have never collided with another person in the past 35 or so years of skiing. I do remember running over the tails of people in two separate incidents in the same period, and I felt really stupid after each one.

I typically get hit a couple of times per season and experience lots of near misses, but mostly these are low speed events while teaching on shallow terrain. Often I'll see these coming and either help out (ie, start skiing backwards and catch the beginner - especially if she is thin, cute and "catchable" ), or just get out of their way and let nature take its course (for everyone else ).

Thusfar, I've been lucky and have suffered no bad collisions, although I see and hear of plenty. My daughter has experienced a couple of collisions at the "bloody nose level" of severity while she was younger, but nothing in the last couple of years (knock on wood).

The closest to a bad collision I ever had was with another instructor in a clinic. We were both concentrating on our tasks, coming down opposite sides of a trail, and had an almost-grazing, very high speed encounter in the middle of the trail when he zigged and I zagged simultaneously. We must have seen each other out of our peripheral vision just b4 the collision, because we were both in full get-back-in-your-own-lane avoidance mode. At the point of closest approach, we were skiing very fast down the fall line, parallel and within inches of each other. If I recall correctly, our skis or poles may have lightly tapped each other's, but our bodies were inclined in opposite directions never actually touched. It could have been really ugly if the angles were different or we hadn't spotted each other in time.

I'm convinced that my size (215 lbs) makes kamikazes stay away from me. I can't count the number of times I've seen an apparently completely-out-of-control skier/boarder heading straight at me, and if I can't get out of the way, I intentionally make an obviously visible bracing move, and miraculously, the person somehow manages to veer off or lays it down before he gets to me. Of course, I would never ever point my poles in their direction to try to affect their course : .

Tom / PM
post #6 of 19
Personally, I never ran into another skier, but collided with a slope a few time. So far my major ski injury was dislocated shoulder.
post #7 of 19
I fell down the stairs (drunk, of course) at the Garibaldi Lift Co in Whistler into some people. Does that count?
post #8 of 19
TELLURIDE SKI RESORT GETS TOUGH WITH
RECKLESS SKIERS & RIDERS
Severe Penalties Implemented for Collisions

TELLURIDE, Colo. (Feb. 16, 2005) - The Telluride Ski Resort (Telski) announces a fresh focus on skier safety, specifically on collisions. Tougher penalties for people colliding with downhill skiers or snowboarders will be enforced. The new, stricter penalties are part of an ongoing commitment to a safe guest experience.

Ski Safety Act: "Each skier has the duty to maintain control of his/her speed and course at all times when skiing and to maintain proper lookout so as to able to avoid other skiers and objects. However, the primary duty shall be on the person skiing downhill to avoid collision with any person or object below him/her."

Two collisions on the mountain last weekend dramatically illustrate the safety issue driving this new focus. A 35-year-old local woman was hit from behind causing the skier to suffer a concussion and shoulder injury. In a second collision a 60-year-old Telluride woman was also hit from behind resulting in serious leg and shoulder injuries.

"Our goal is to refocus the culture surrounding potential collisions from behind, so that skiers and snowboarders recognize the assaultative and violent nature of rear-end accidents," said Telski Owner Chuck Horning. "Skiers and riders must assume personal responsibility for their skiing and we intend to eliminate these accidents as much as possible. It is our hope and intention that the new penalties will not be necessary due to our efforts to educate the community concerning the seriousness of these violations. We will be going to the schools to help educate our youth to this focus on personal responsibility and respect for others. Most skiers are respectful. The few who choose not to comply will not ski here."

The new guidelines for hitting a skier or snowboarder from behind:
* At fault with no injuries - 30 day revocation of ski area privileges
* At fault with injuries - 1 year revocation of ski area privileges
* Any second collision - 5-year revocation of ski area privileges

* Hit and run collision without injuries - 1 year revocation of ski area privileges
* Hit and run collisions with injuries - 5 year suspension and prosecution for violation of "Ski Safety Act"

Reckless or Unsafe Skiing or Snowboarding:
* 1st offense - Name on list and two-week revocation of ski area privileges
* 2nd offense - 1-year revocation of ski area privileges
* 3rd offense - 2-year revocation of ski area privileges

"There are a few skiers /snowboarders on the mountain who believe that reckless skiing is part of the experience. Our goal is to focus on safety for all guests, reckless skiing will not be tolerated," said John Cohn, director of security for Telski. "Skiers and riders must assume personal responsibility for their skiing."

The security department will be looking for anyone engaging in conduct that may cause injury, including reckless or unsafe skiing or snowboarding. The fault of the collision will be determined by ski patrol, witness reports, or at the sole discretion of the security department. "Our purpose is to reinforce the Colorado Ski Safety Act," said Cohn.

Telski is committed to on-mountain safety and constantly assesses programs and incidents on the mountain. Currently the resort provides some of the safest skiing and boarding available, averaging only 1.465 injuries per 1,000 skier days. This is far below the industry average of 2.63 injuries per 1,000 skiers. "However, we would like to see zero injuries per thousand skier days," said Horning. The resort asks the community to support safety on the mountain by skiing in control and being aware of fellow skiers.
post #9 of 19
I have a question regarding collisions, if your moving around someone but then you notice someone behind you moving into your path at a great speed meaning a collison is imminent (this collision is going to be nasty) so you basically drop to stop as quickly as you can but this causes you to coast up to the person you were avoiding, so you basically stop touching skis/board how do you call it?

The skier/border behind is always responsible but does this continue back up the slope if you get my meaning?

i ask as this has happened a couple of times and i felt that me sliding up to the other person is a less injury prone scenario that colliding with the person behind me.
post #10 of 19
Personally, my only time "running into someone" want actually a landing on, but that's antoher story, other than that, I have never hit anyone. I've had a few close calls, but that was it (normally screwing around but never within less than a couple feet). I've intentionally come close to people's skis that I know (and that know me and know I won't hit them no matter how close I am).

I just cannot understand how so many people on here get hit and beyond that get hit so frequently. I know when I am skiing, I am very attentive to what is going on in front of me (in fact it saved a collision this week, having noticed a change in the skis, a split second before the person in front of me was snapping to switch, going from forward to backward) and always very attentive to what is going on behind me. Yes I will look up hill, I will predict movements/turns (or stand still so I can be avoided), and I listen. In my honest opinion, yes, ultimately it is the upper hill person who has to yeild to the downhill skier, however, I also feel that many times accidents can be avoided if everyone takes a bit more accountability.
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider
The new guidelines for hitting a skier or snowboarder from behind:
* At fault with no injuries - 30 day revocation of ski area privileges
* At fault with injuries - 1 year revocation of ski area privileges
* Any second collision - 5-year revocation of ski area privileges

* Hit and run collision without injuries - 1 year revocation of ski area privileges
* Hit and run collisions with injuries - 5 year suspension and prosecution for violation of "Ski Safety Act"

Reckless or Unsafe Skiing or Snowboarding:
* 1st offense - Name on list and two-week revocation of ski area privileges
* 2nd offense - 1-year revocation of ski area privileges
* 3rd offense - 2-year revocation of ski area privileges
I think the structure of the penalties is weird. I don't think the results matter more than the behavior...a quarter inch this way or that way can be the difference between an injury or no injury and I think the penalty should be the same. Sure, if there is an injury, the perp should be liable for actual damages and billed for the ski patrol, etc. But the punitive aspect should not differ.

I also don't care for the "Any second collision" thing, with no finding of fault.

Overall, I aplaud the effort but I'm curious about who "The security department" is.
post #12 of 19
I once hit a woman and paid for it dearly. I was 12 years old when I went over the backs of her skis. I did a slow twisting fall (on wood skis with cable bindings) and had a spiral fracture of my tibia and fibula. I was in a cast for over 3 months and limped until summer time (broke my leg in December). The woman I hit was fine. I have not hit anyone since nor have I been hit with any real force.
post #13 of 19
Interesting....

I wonder how they will determine "reckless and unsafe skiing"? Will there be a judge and jury?

I realize that I am one of the people who recently posted about a "near" miss (is 5' "near" in your vocabulary?), but in my 20+ year sof teaching and about 28 years of skiing, I have only been involved in one collision, in which I was hit from behind.

Here's an insteresting scenario. Pick a steep blue groomer, where there are a lot of people cruising at moderate to high speeds. Does the random beginning wedge turner, who shouldn't be there, and is causing havok for everyone else (although no one gets run into) get privileges revoked for reckless and unsafe skiing? Say someone is carving hard across the hill, and this person turns into them, causing a head-on collision. Who was being wreckless or unsafe? The expert carver who was in control or the wedge turner who was just barely in control, and was unable to avoid the other skier?
post #14 of 19
Quote:
The expert carver who was in control or the wedge turner who was just barely in control, and was unable to avoid the other skier?
While the people who get in over their heads are an annoyance, I think by definition the "expert" should be capable of avoiding a collision. I don't find it difficult to scrub speed to a point where it's pretty easy to watch for the beginner to commit to a turn and then point it behind them. Yeah, it kind of sucks to have a nice rhythm ruined but it beats the alternative.
Shouldn't the expert have many turn shapes at his/her disposal and the ability to switch them on the fly?
post #15 of 19
I started to write that I've never hit anyone or been hit ... actually, I was run into once, when I was about 8 or so, by a teenager. He was so apologetic, he bought me a hamburger.

In my youth (i.e. when I was a teenager), I think I came closer than I should have on a few occasions, but never hit anyone. So I'm still one hamburger ahead.

(I'm not counting the time - again in my youth - when I went off a downhill course lying on my side and bounced off six or eight people).
post #16 of 19
I applaude the Telluride initiative. If we can't depend upon personal responsibility to limit negligent behavior, then sanctions are the only alternative.

Damage from a severe collision can result in permanent injury or death. A fool ripping down the hill at 50 mph can easily kill a small child, or adult.

No sane person wants to hurt somebody else. But, plenty of people need a wake-up call regarding their on-hill habits (I've paid plenty for my own stupidity - see above).

Local word of reckless ripper being banned for a year or 5 will send a message.

Kudos!
post #17 of 19
I've hit and been hit with no serious consquences.
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by xdog1
I've hit and been hit with no serious consquences.
Xdog: You've been lucky. Many others haven't.
post #19 of 19
Definitely lucky, two or three years ago a skier bombing down a run at Breckenridge collided with an older person snowboarding. Both were wearing helmets, both died.
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