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SCAM Alert

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Be aware of anyone posting a request for price/condition/shipping while offering to purchase "no questions asked" The scam being run on Craigslist.org has been that the buyer will send you a "certifed check" for your item plus a certain amount extra. You cash the check. The bank usually first cashes it. The checks are counterfeit. After a little while, the bank gets the check back as a fraud and they will hold you responsible for funds as well as some recovery costs.

Don't get fooled by this scam

see here for Craigslist.org known scams
post #2 of 17
Ewww!!!!

Thanks for the heads up. Call the FBI. Fake checks are a big deal to them.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks Rusty Guy for the heads up that we were getting postings like this. I just deleted 10 such posts and banned the user.
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
for those of you that have never seen one of these scams here's what the one posted here looked like.

Quote:
Hello seller,
This is to notify you that my son in Nigeria is celebrating his birthday very soon and i wish to buy this product for him as a birthday gift please get back to me with the price you are wiling to sell it for me plus the shipping cost to Nigeria and i will send the payment to you.Thanks.
I hope to hear from you as soon as posiible
adewalealoko2002@yahoo.com
post #5 of 17
ohh- the seller of that one should check out 419eater.com
It gives tons of ways to give scammers a taste of their own medicine

Nigerian skiing must be outta this world...
post #6 of 17
this stuff is rampant on cl....for example, i just last night posted a bike for sale on the san fran cl and in the middle of the night got two responses, both obviously fake. we can laugh about this but please take care when dealing on sites with no protection or feedback mechanism...not all the scams are as obvious as the 'nigerian birthday' one...
post #7 of 17
I had a recent experience on Ebay where I asked questions of a seller, and had the questions intercepted by a third party who sent me an offer to sell similiar equipment.... in my unhappy case some skis.This third party represented himself as the Ebay seller of the item I asked questions about. I responded and eventually sent a cashiers check to a Texas address that turned out to be a fraudlent seller. No help from Ebay because the "deal" was outside of their system. I filed a report with Internet Fraud site. Be careful....don't learn the hard way as I did.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
Be aware of anyone posting a request for price/condition/shipping while offering to purchase "no questions asked" The scam being run on Craigslist.org has been that the buyer will send you a "certifed check" for your item plus a certain amount extra. You cash the check. The bank usually first cashes it. The checks are counterfeit. After a little while, the bank gets the check back as a fraud and they will hold you responsible for funds as well as some recovery costs.

Don't get fooled by this scam

see here for Craigslist.org known scams
This scenario leaves out the kicker that makes this deal worthwhile for the scamster - they issue you a cashier's check (fake) for $X over the purchase price. They then ask you to wire the difference ($total - (product +shipping)) via western union to them. You wire the money out, cash, find out a few days later that the cashier's check is fake (it passes the initial teller's inspection), and you're screwed...trying to recover cash once wired through western union is, well...impossible...

Otherwise, the above scenario doesn't really make sense - what funds are they holding you responsible for? Unless you withdrew the money and spent it immediately, there's nothing you'll lose except for possibly some fees.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by yelloboy
there's nothing you'll lose except for possibly some fees.
And whatever goods were shipped. Plus, they always request it be done FedEx Intl Express, which costs a ton they willingly pay for with a bum check.

As an etailer, I get Nigerians wanting ski gear shipped overnight to them all the time. And they offer to pay by credit card. If you want to do a semi-credible deal with someone proposing something like this, ask them to establish a verified Paypal account. That usually weeds out the scams.
post #10 of 17
[quote=Sluff Vertigo]And whatever goods were shipped. QUOTE]

yes, of course.

though, in my experience, the larger versions of these scams center around big ticket items (used cars) - in that case, they ask you to wire them thousands of dollars, while the car never actually moves.
post #11 of 17
usually there never is a car, lol.
post #12 of 17
This is a Nigeran Scam. Becuase of where they are located, this is considered legal and there are no real laws inforced. It is a shame because it costs tax payers here in the stats millions every year due to the amount of conflict between the person who recieved the check being made out to look like they are defrauding the person to whom the account truly belongs to. I had this happen and when I get e-mails I always give out my PO box info, check the routing number and account number and either call the account owner or have the bank notify them of this.

Beware and be safe!
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by yelloboy
This scenario leaves out the kicker that makes this deal worthwhile for the scamster - they issue you a cashier's check (fake) for $X over the purchase price. They then ask you to wire the difference ($total - (product +shipping)) via western union to them. You wire the money out, cash, find out a few days later that the cashier's check is fake (it passes the initial teller's inspection), and you're screwed...trying to recover cash once wired through western union is, well...impossible...

Otherwise, the above scenario doesn't really make sense - what funds are they holding you responsible for? Unless you withdrew the money and spent it immediately, there's nothing you'll lose except for possibly some fees.
Actually what happens is your bank has a set number of days to clear a money order from out of the country, (say 2 weeks). So you receive the money order and deposit it in your bank account. 2 weeks later, the money is automatically credited to your account and you ship the item, but it takes 3 weeks or longer for the Nigerian (or Liberian,etc.) bank to get back to your bank that the money order was counterfeit, and your bank then debits your account for the amount. Unfortunately, you're stuck for the money, since you can't go after the guy in ???... It usually happens with higher ticket items like cars and such.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by yelloboy
This scenario leaves out the kicker that makes this deal worthwhile for the scamster - they issue you a cashier's check (fake) for $X over the purchase price. They then ask you to wire the difference ($total - (product +shipping)) via western union to them. You wire the money out, cash, find out a few days later that the cashier's check is fake (it passes the initial teller's inspection), and you're screwed...trying to recover cash once wired through western union is, well...impossible...

Otherwise, the above scenario doesn't really make sense - what funds are they holding you responsible for? Unless you withdrew the money and spent it immediately, there's nothing you'll lose except for possibly some fees.
Actually what happens is your bank has a set number of days to clear a money order from out of the country, (say 2 weeks). So you receive the money order and deposit it in your bank account. 2 weeks later, the money is automatically credited to your account and you ship the item, but it takes 3 weeks or longer for the Nigerian (or Liberian,etc.) bank to get back to your bank that the money order was counterfeit, and your bank then debits your account for the amount. Unfortunately, you're stuck for the money, since you can't go after the guy in ???... It usually happens with higher ticket items like cars and such.
post #15 of 17

this happened to a friend of mine on ebay

A friend of mine was selling his car on Ebay and someone tride to use this scam on him. Luckily he was smart enough to call the bank and check it out before he went 7000.00 in the hole. Why do people have to be smack offs like that.
post #16 of 17
It happens to me all the time. I am a boat broker and advertise on various websites. Boats.com, yachtworld.com and I get an email like that every couple of weeks or so. Always wanting to pay more for the boat and wanting cash back from their so called certified check. Being in the business of selling big ticket items on the web I am always aware of these scams that pop up, from trade publications and so on.

When they prey on individuals trying to sell something its a real bite. I have even had customers call me and read me thier e mail, thinking they have a live one until I explain what is really happening.
post #17 of 17
thanks
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