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How to be "Predictable" - Page 3

post #61 of 81
Have any of you ever had those disaster nightmares?

The ones where everything is in slow motion and time is barely even ticking?

Where everyone and everything is being inexhorably drawn toward impending doom?

I just had the daydream version of that.

:

Bob
post #62 of 81
Why don't the experienced skiers stay where they belong and quit scaring the poor beginners so badly that they run into them? Seriously, one of the best improvements at my ski area was when they rerouted fast downhill traffic away from beginner areas. If you can't change attitudes, change the situation.
post #63 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni

Can you imagine Lance Armstrong looking over his shoulder?
How about Tony Stewart "looking back" to make sure no one is on his tail ready to spin him out?
Or the motorcycle racer, motocross racer, or anyone on rollerblades in the park, turning around to see who's there?

: : : Yeah. Whatever.

oh my... I feel stupider for having read this post
post #64 of 81
I made some dumb comments like the one above, LeeLau, and have been severely chastised for it. Of course the experienced sport enthusiast will be able to look behind with balance and skill. These were bad examples.

I was thinking of the inexperienced person, which is who we were discussing. My bad. Over and out.
post #65 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
Can you imagine Lance Armstrong looking over his shoulder?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
I made some dumb comments like the one above, LeeLau, and have been severely chastised for it. Of course the experienced sport enthusiast will be able to look behind with balance and skill. These were bad examples.
Yea Bonni, I got a chuckle out of the Lance comment when I read it too; the over the shoulder stare just happens to be one of the most vivid images seared into the memory of Lance lovers. Not the best example you could have picked.

Ahhhh, big whoop. We don't all get OLN, do we!
post #66 of 81
If it is crowded or I sense someone close behind I will signal a turn with my arm at a fork such as at K where you can turn onto Great Eastern or cross over onto Bear Claw.

Also, I puff myself up like a cat and hold my poles a little more spread in a crowd which makes me look big and dangerous so nobody behind me would dare get too close
post #67 of 81
post #68 of 81
As the sailing epitaph goes:

Here lies the body of Danny O'Day
Who died defending his right of way;
He was just as right as the day is long
But he's just as dead as if he'd been wrong.
post #69 of 81
I'm not suggesting being right makes you safer or is any consolation. I *am* suggesting that many of the suggested ways of being "proactive" are more dangerous than doing nothing but skiing per the code.
post #70 of 81
Thread Starter 
Okay, this is what I've gotten so far...

1) Do nothing else except keep learning and following the code

2) Be consistent, even if I don't have the skills to do so

3) If I can't be consistent, then I should at least try to be consistently INconsistent, so as not to confuse anyone, because the most confusing to others is when I am inconsistently inconsistent

4) Look over my shoulder

5) Don't look over my shoulder

6) Glance with peripheral vision over my shoulder so as not to inadvertantly turn my skis erratically and cause even more inconsistency

7) Glance over my shoulder to make sure that Lance Armstrong isn't overtaking me without a helmet on

8) Don't stop on the side of the trail

9) Don't stop in the middle of the trail

10) Stop in the middle of the trail if there is a post to hide behind

11) Don't stop behind any posts that might be below chairlifts

12) Don't ski in front of potheads

13) Don't ski in front of kids

14) Don't ski in front of 70's guys with bluejeans

15) Only ski UNpopular green slopes and only at odd hours of the day

16) Only ski green slopes that don't have expert run-offs at the end of the day, but true experts won't really hit me anyway

17) Ski faster, but only if Jan Ullrich is behind me and threatening to swerve uphill to me on a bump run.


It's all SOOOoooooo clear to me now!!!!

Seriously, thanks so much for all the input -- though I sure wish I could get hold of some of that secret formula that superheros always seem to swallow -- I want to grow eyestalks on the back of my head!

Failing that, I guess I should get a helmet.:
post #71 of 81
HAHAHA! Don't worry, just ski! You'll be fine as long as you always remember the 17 things you mentioned.
post #72 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrFRAU

It's all SOOOoooooo clear to me now!!!!
PURRRRR-FECT!

Now, did you have any other burning questions that we can help with?

Bob
post #73 of 81
The easy questions always get easier answers here.

I guess no one mentioned mounting a little rear view mirror on your helmet or goggles. That could be number 18. I think Lance would use one but it might not have the same taunting affect on Ullrich. It could make him fall off his bike laughing though.
post #74 of 81
Toward the end of last ski season, I read an article about Colorado skier deaths in which the typical accident victim was characterized:

  • Intermediate to advanced
  • Male, 30-40 years old
  • Going fast
  • On a groomed blue run
  • Along the edge
This sounded almost exactly like me (except I'm too old ), so I've since tried not to ski fast along the edges of runs. If I see slower skiers ahead, I slow down, and I no longer try to speed past slower skiers along the side of the run. In retrospect, this was the cause of many of the close calls I've experienced in the past.

There'll always be another opportunity to go fast, unless I do something stupid and injure myself (or worse, somebody else).
post #75 of 81
Ok - We all agree that DrFrau is sensible in not wanting to be causing unecessary clutter on the slope, and we all understand that if we are uphill we have 100% responsibility to avoid DrFrau and her downhill slower cohorts.

My suggestion is that DrFrau focus on who is below her and how to avoid them.

If she maintains her current attitude (which in my view is excellent) it cannot be long before she learns what predictable behaviour is the same way that we did! By realising that suddenly there were people less predictable in FRONT of us. She will perhaps never be the fastest gun in the west but she already isnt the slowest
post #76 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick
It's the overtaking skiers reponcibility to avoid colliding with those he passes,,, period. The skier being passed has absolutely no obligation to manage his manner of movement so as to make it easier for others to pass him.
The problem with the above is that its not always practical. Like many skiers, I ski a crowded manic icy home run path at the end of every ski day. Skiers of different levels are all overtaking each other and surviving by the skin of their teeth most of the time. However if one skier falls than you have the highway pile up affect. Just as on the highway, in theory every driver has left a safe stopping distance in accordance with the safety code. In reality the crowded conditions and human impatience have combined so that only a small proportion of drivers are able to react effectively to the unexpected. My guess is that in a crowded path situation, less than 10% of the skiers could perform an safe hockey stop in the space and reaction time available.
post #77 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrFRAU
I have been noting in the collision threads that the more experienced skiiers express frustration at the unpredictablility of beginning skiers and never knowing when they might turn into your line...
Sounds like the more experienced skiers trying to make up excuses for their inabilities or neglegence to me.

You follow the same responsibility code that the experienced skiers are supposed to follow and if you get hit from behind it is not your fault but the "more experienced" idiot behind you. Don't stand for it.
post #78 of 81
A question to ponder ... How many instructors or patrollers have you ever seen plow into someone? In your whole skiing career? Are you sure you thought waaaay back?

Not too many, eh? I guess they mustn't be experienced enough to overtake people or maybe they just aren't on the slopes enough for it to "happen to them". :

Then again, maybe it's something else like experience, maturity and judgement.

Tom / PM
post #79 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman
You follow the same responsibility code that the experienced skiers are supposed to follow and if you get hit from behind it is not your fault but the "more experienced" idiot behind you. Don't stand for it.
That is more easily said that done, Bud, especially when this advice is dispensed to beginners and slower folks who are fearing for their lives. While it is fine to say that it is "not your fault" if hit from behind, worrying about who is legally at fault is the last of their worries when they are trying to negotiate their way down hill.

Don't stand for it? Certainly not. : Most people plastered from behind are usually not left standing.

I think Dr Frau was asking for tactics she can use to make herself less exposed to the faster and more reckless skiers.
post #80 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpowrie
. My guess is that in a crowded path situation, less than 10% of the skiers could perform an safe hockey stop in the space and reaction time available.
I am under strict instruction that stopping should be my absolute LAST resort in that sort of situation....
post #81 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhysicsMan
A question to ponder ... How many instructors or patrollers have you ever seen plow into someone? In your whole skiing career? Are you sure you thought waaaay back?

Not too many, eh? I guess they mustn't be experienced enough to overtake people or maybe they just aren't on the slopes enough for it to "happen to them". :

Then again, maybe it's something else like experience, maturity and judgement.

Tom / PM
Word, my brother.
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