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Helmet Advice for Child

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Hello everyone.Does anyone have any advice on who makes the best helmet for a 41/2 year old girl.After searching many threads it seems a no-brainer to get her one but I couldnt find any preferences on which one is best.Thank you in advance.
post #2 of 27

I have had...

the same problem the last few years for my (now) five year old little ripper. I got him a giro (childs model) last year and a boeri scrapper this year. I think both were excellent.

The most important thing is fit. Make sure it is snug. Don't try to buy big to get two years out of it. Safety first.

The things I looked for were: fit and weight.

This time of year I always look for sales for next years helmet.
post #3 of 27
I don't know that I can say that one brand is better than any other but I favor Giro for both adult and youth helmets. My kids have been wearing Giro's for years and we've had good luck with them. They're light and seem to adapt to different shaped heads very well. Their youth helmets are even somewhat adjustable to ensure a good fit as the kids grow.
post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 

Thanks

Thanks guys.Are you talking about the Ricochet by Giro?It said it was adjustable.Do you guys wear a helmet so as not to appear hypocritical?My wife is death on us wearing them,the "I never wore a helmet"thing.We also stood up in the back seat of the car while riding back in the day.I guess things have changed.Thank you
post #5 of 27
Yes , the Ricochet is one and I believe the other one is the Sonic.

I do wear a helmet. If you get one that's light and vented, you won't even know it's there. I have the Giro Nine 9.
post #6 of 27
Whatever you do, make sure that you get a kids model. They are lighter, and given that kids already have a very high CM, they don't need an adult model making it any higher....

Cheers!
post #7 of 27
For my kids, the primary concern was what fit best, although fashion was certainly part of the equation (they like to look good too). I can recall shopping with my daughter for her first helmet (she was 4) and her insistence on getting the one that came with dinasour stickers.
post #8 of 27
Here's a quick tip that will save you some trouble and make your daughter happy...try to find a helmet with soft ear flaps (usually removable!!). Both of my sons' first helmets were of the hard shell over the ear variety (most kids helmets are-unfortunately) but their ears were getting constantly squashed, folded, pushed and irritated...But now I use a Giro youth helmet that has the soft-removable ear flaps (but alas no vents) just like my adult giro nine...the ear complaints have stopped and it's easier than ever to get their helmets on and off. Soft ear pieces-key to happiness. Really. It's funny how the little things can make a big difference in kid comfort.
post #9 of 27
I bought my daughter a Giro S4 a couple of years ago, extra small size. Although I guess technically it is an adult helmet it fits her great and is nice and light and she doesn't complain about wearing it (which is the best thing!). Giro and Boeri make nice helmets for kids as well. I know many shops in my area (NJ) are having 20% off sales on helmets so now's the time to buy! Also REI and Snowshack online are also having sales. Have her try on a bunch first. Actually once you get the size, model and color you could also try eBay.

Marc
post #10 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thank you all for your responses.The trying on part will be hard as here in Florida there is really no place close that carries them.It does seem from the responses that the Giro adjustable helmet might be a good bet to at least try.That and getting past my wifes insistance that she doesnt need one on the "Bunny Hill".Thank you
post #11 of 27
#1 Fit
#2 Weight
#3 Ventilation

I think Giro has the best line out there. Lot's of great deals on kids sizes on EBay.
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by rinski123
Thank you all for your responses.The trying on part will be hard as here in Florida there is really no place close that carries them.It does seem from the responses that the Giro adjustable helmet might be a good bet to at least try.That and getting past my wifes insistance that she doesnt need one on the "Bunny Hill".Thank you
Trust me you need a helmet for her on ANY hill. Where do you plan on taking her skiing?
post #13 of 27
Another positive experience with the Giro kids helmet (I don't remember the model name, but Ricochet sounds vaguely familiar).
post #14 of 27
It only took my wife watching another woman who fell back into the chair getting off a lift and splitting her head open to get over the "I don't need a helmet" thing. Helmets are almost more useful at protecting you from others, than protecting you from yourself. Good luck.
post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gores95
Trust me you need a helmet for her on ANY hill. Where do you plan on taking her skiing?

We are going to Snowshoe WVA next month.She has only been on skis once,but seemed to enjoy it.We have signed her up for ski school and the lady i spoke to said helmets were not required but strongly recommended.Thank you
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by rinski123
We are going to Snowshoe WVA next month.She has only been on skis once,but seemed to enjoy it.We have signed her up for ski school and the lady i spoke to said helmets were not required but strongly recommended.Thank you
If you are only going one time you should rent a helmet at the mountain. Probably cost you $5-10 for the day. Especially if you will not be skiing again anytime soon.

Never been to Snowshoe but have heard good things about it.
post #17 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gores95
If you are only going one time you should rent a helmet at the mountain. Probably cost you $5-10 for the day. Especially if you will not be skiing again anytime soon.

Never been to Snowshoe but have heard good things about it.
Well we will be there for a week so at that rate it would cost almost as much as buying her one.She also measures out right in the middle of the adjustable size so I would think it would still fit into next year..maybe?My wife and I plan to be doing a lot more skiing now that she is getting old enough to be able to learn.Thank you
post #18 of 27
Anyone know of solid data on helmets and ski injuries? I'm not talking about anecdotes or common sense or your personal opinion. Not saying those are of no value... they are just of no value to me.
post #19 of 27
A lot of areas rent helmets now. You might want to check this out as an option.
post #20 of 27
another vote for Giro. my kids have the ricochet and sonic, and they work great. I love my 9.

I just started wearing a helmet this year, and I'm more comfortable with it than without. keeps me nice and warm, and it's light enough that I don't really notice it.
post #21 of 27

data

Quote:
Originally Posted by porcupine
Anyone know of solid data on helmets and ski injuries? I'm not talking about anecdotes or common sense or your personal opinion. Not saying those are of no value... they are just of no value to me.
Here you go, Porcupine , part 1:

http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml99/99046.html
http://www.cpsc.gov/LIBRARY/skihelm.pdf
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5044.html
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/mai...04/ixworld.html


Quote:
1: BMJ. 2005 Jan 4; [Epub ahead of print]
Effectiveness of helmets in skiers and snowboarders: case-control and case crossover study.

Hagel BE, Pless IB, Goulet C, Platt RW, Robitaille Y. Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, 4075 RTF, 8308-114 Street, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2E1.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of helmets on the risk of head and neck injuries in skiers and snowboarders. DESIGN: Matched case-control and case crossover study. SETTING: 19 ski areas in
Quebec, Canada, November 2001 to April 2002. PARTICIPANTS: 1082 skiers and snowboarders (cases) with head and neck injuries reported by the ski patrol and 3295 skiers and snowboarders (controls) with non-head or non-neck injuries matched to cases at each hill.
MAIN OUTCOME
MEASURES: Estimates of matched odds ratios for the effect of helmet use on the risk of any head or neck injury and for people requiring evacuation by ambulance. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratio for helmet use in participants with any head injury was 0.71 (95% confidence interval 0.55 to 0.92), indicating a 29% reduction in the risk of head injury. For participants who required evacuationby ambulance for head injuries, the adjusted odds ratio for helmet use was 0.44 (0.24 to 0.81). Similar results occurred with the case crossover design (odds ratio 0.43, 0.09 to 1.83). The adjusted odds ratio for helmet use for participants with any neck injury was 0.62 (0.33 to 1.19) and for participants who required evacuation by ambulance for neck injuries it was 1.29 (0.41 to 4.04). CONCLUSIONS: Helmets protect skiers and snowboarders against head injuries. We cannot rule out the possibility of an increased risk of neck injury with helmet use, but the estimates on which this assumption is based are imprecise.
post #22 of 27

data part 2

Porcupine, part 2 (happy reading) :

Quote:
2: Epidemiology. 2004 May;15(3):279-86.

Injuries among skiers and snowboarders in
Quebec.

Hagel BE, Goulet C, Platt RW, Pless IB. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics,
McGillUniversity, Montreal,Quebec, Canada.

BACKGROUND: Snow sports such as skiing and snowboarding are recognized as hazardous, but population-based injury rates or specific risk factors have been difficult to estimate as a result of a lack of complete data for both numerator and denominator. METHODS: We used data from 3 surveys to estimate the number of participants and annual number of outings in
Quebec by age, sex, activity, and calendar year. Injuries reported by ski patrollers were used to estimate injury rates among skiers and snowboarders for the head and neck, trunk, upper extremity, and lower extremity. RESULTS: Head-neck and trunk injury rates increased over time from 1995-1996 to 1999-2000. There was a steady increase in the rate of injury with younger age for all body regions. The rate of head-neck injury was 50% higher in snowboarders than in skiers (adjusted rate ratio [ARR]= 1.5; 95% confidence interval = 1.3-1.8). Women and girls had a lower rate of head-neck injury (0.73; 0.62-0.87). Snowboarders were twice as likely as skiers to have injuries of the trunk (2.1; 1.7-2.6), and more than 3 times as likely to have injuries of the upper extremities (3.4; 2.9-4.1). Snowboarders had a lower rate of injury only of the lower extremities (0.79; 0.66-0.95). Snowboarder collision-related injury rates increased substantially over time. CONCLUSIONS:Except for lower extremity injuries, snowboarders have a higher rate of injuries than skiers. Furthermore, collision-related injury rates have increased over time for snowboarders. Targeted injury prevention strategies in this group seem justified.

3: Can J Public Health. 2003 Nov-Dec;94(6):458-62.

Trends in emergency department reported head and neck injuries among skiers and snowboarders.

Hagel BE, Pless B, Platt RW. Joint Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics,
McGillUniversity, Montreal,QC.

BACKGROUND: Reports from the
U.S. suggest increases in the proportion and rate of head and neck injuries in skiers and snowboarders. It is important to determine if the same is true in Canada. METHODS: Skiers and snowboarders (< 18years) presenting to 16 selected emergency departments from 1991 to 1999 were assigned one body region of injury in the following order: i) brain and spine-spinal cord, ii) head and neck, iii) face, iv) other body region (i.e.,controls). Crude and adjusted (age, gender, helmet use and hospital admission) odds ratios indicating the proportion of head, brain, face, and neck injury relative to controls by calendar year were estimated. Injury rates were examined for 12 to 17 year olds over the last 4 years of the study. RESULTS: Compared with 1997-1999, there was a lower proportion of skier head injuries from 1991-93 (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.16; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.09-0.30) and from 1995-97 (AOR = 0.71; 95% CI = 0.49-1.04). The proportion of skier brain injuries was lower from 1993-95 (AOR = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.44-1.07) and from 1995-97 (AOR = 0.56; 95% CI: 0.35-0.91). In snowboarders, however, compared with 1997-99, there was evidence that although the proportion of head injuries was lower from 1991-93 (AOR = 0.19; 95% CI = 0.05-0.80), the opposite was true for facial injuries. For 12 to 17 year olds, skier brain and snowboarder head and neck injury rates increased from 1995-99. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that head and brain injuries in skiers and head and neck injuries in snowboarders may be increasing, particularly in adolescents.

4: Inj Prev. 2004 Apr;10(2):99-102.

Downhill skiing injury fatalities among children.

Xiang H, Stallones L, Smith GA. Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment,
USA.

OBJECTIVE: Young skiers are at increased risk for injury, however, epidemiological data on skiing related fatal injuries among child skiers are scarce. This study aimed to provide information needed to develop injury control and prevention programs. DESIGN AND SETTING: Study subjects came from
Colorado, USA and were identified using a death certificate based surveillance system. Fatal injuries were limited to events that occurred at established commercial ski resorts in Colorado, and subjects were classified as child skiers (0-17years) or adult skiers (> or =18 years). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Type and external cause, time, and week day of injury, gender and residency of the decedents. RESULTS: During the study period from 1980-2001, 149 fatal injuries associated with downhill skiing were identified; 21 (14.1%) occurred among child skiers aged < or =17 years. The age of the youngest decedent was 7 years. In females the proportion of fatal injuries among child skiers was nearly three times that of adults. Traumatic brain injuries were the leading cause of death (67% of all deaths) among children, while multiple internal injuries and traumatic brain injuries accounted for almost equal proportions of fatal injuries among adults. Collision was the leading external mechanism of fatal injuries, accounting for more than two thirds of fatal injuries in both child and adult skiers.CONCLUSIONS: Traumatic brain injury was the leading cause and collision was the leading external injury mechanism of fatal injuries associated with downhill skiing among child skiers. This underscores the importance of brain injury prevention strategies, including the use of ski helmets and prevention of collisions on ski slopes.

5: Injury. 2003 Dec;34(12):892-6.

Deaths associated with snow skiing in
Colorado 1980-1981 to 2000-2001 ski seasons.

Xiang H, Stallones L. Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment,Vital Statistics Unit, 4300 Cherry Creek Drive South, Denver, CO 80246-1530,USA.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the trend and injury patterns of deaths associated with snow skiing in
Colorado between 1980 and 2001. METHODS: Death certificates were searched electronically and reviewed manually. Total skier ticket sales were used to calculate death rates. Types of injuries and characteristics of those who died were investigated. RESULTS: A total of 274 skier deaths occurred between 1980 and 2001 in Colorado. Death rates ranged from 0.53 to 1.88 per million skier visits. The majority of deaths were among males (>81%). Ages ranged from 7 to 77 years with an average of 32 years. The greatest number of deaths associated with downhill skiing (76 deaths) occurred between 10:00 a.m.and 2:00 p.m. while the greatest number of deaths associated with cross-country skiing happened between 2:00 and 6:00 p.m. About 65% of deaths associated with downhill skiing (133 cases) died of traumatic injuries resulting from collisions. CONCLUSIONS: A slight increase in the rate of ski-related deaths was observed. The role of collisions in ski-related deaths warrants further investigation to reduce the risk of this activity for all skiers. Further work is needed to determine the efficacy of helmet use to reduce the risk of head injuries in the skiing population.

6: Am J Emerg Med. 2003 Mar;21(2):95-9.

Serious winter sport injuries in children and adolescents requiring hospitalization.

Skokan EG, Junkins EP Jr, Kadish H. Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Universityof Utah School of Medicine, and the Intermountain Injury Control Research CenterSalt Lake City, Utah 84113, USA.

To describe the epidemiology of serious winter sports-related injuries resulting in hospitalization in children and adolescents, we prospectively collected and analyzed records of all winter sports-related injuries requiring hospitalization at our respective institutions from 1996 to 2000. We identified 101 patients with a mean age of 10.7 years, of whom 68% were male and 32% female. Skiers accounted for 71% and snowboarders 26% of injuries; 3% of injuries were snowmobile-or luge-related. Leading mechanisms of injury were ground level falls(50%), crashes into trees, (18%), and falls from ski lift (13%). Approximately 26% of the patients met criteria for trauma-team activation. Leading diagnoses were head injury (20%), femur fracture (18%), and concussion (11%). Five patients required admission to the intensive care unit. The median injury severity score (ISS) was 7; 8% of patients had an ISS score > 15. Abbreviated Injury Scale-1990 scores of > or = 3 were noted in 34% of the patients. We conclude that Injuries sustained through participation in winter sports may be severe, especially in the case of injuries involving the head. Injury-prevention strategies should focus on head injuries. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science(
USA). All rights reserved.)

7: Inj Prev. 2002 Dec;8(4):324-7.

Effect of helmet wear on the incidence of head/face and cervical spine injuries in young skiers and snowboarders.

Macnab AJ, Smith T, Gagnon FA, Macnab M. Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

PURPOSE: To evaluate whether helmets increase the incidence and/or severity of cervical spine injury; decrease the incidence of head injury; and/or increase the incidence of collisions (as a reflection of adverse effects on peripheral vision and/or auditory acuity) among young skiers and snowboarders. METHODS: During one ski season (1998-99) at a world class ski resort, all young skiers and snowboarders (<13 years of age) presenting with head, face, or neck injury to the one central medical facility at the base of the mountain were identified.On presentation to the clinic, subjects or their parents completed a questionnaire reviewing their use of helmets and circumstances surrounding the injury event. Physicians documented the site and severity of injury, investigations, and disposition of each patient. Concurrently, counts were made at the entry to the ski area of the number of skiers and snowboarders wearing helmets. RESULTS: Seventy children were evaluated at the clinic following ski/snowboard related head, neck, and face injuries. Fourteen did not require investigation or treatment. Of the remaining 56, 17 (30%) were wearing helmets and 39 (70%) were not. No serious neck injury occurred in either group. Using helmet-use data from the hill, among those under 13 years of age, failure to wear a helmet increased the risk of head, neck, or face injury (relative risk(RR) 2.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23 to 4.12). When corrected for activity, RR was 1.77 and 95% CI 0.98 to 3.19. There was no significant difference in the odds ratio for collisions. The two groups may have been different in terms of various relevant characteristics not evaluated. No separate analysis of catastrophic injuries was possible. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that, in skiers and snowboarders under 13 years of age, helmet use does not increase the incidence of cervical spine injury and does reduce the incidence of head injury requiring investigation and/or treatment.

8: Semin Neurol. 2000;20(2):233-45.

Neurologic injuries in skiers and snowboarders.

LevyAS, Smith RH. Intermountain Neurosurgery and St. Anthony Central Hospital, Denver, Colorado80204, USA.

Neurologic injures are the leading cause of death and disability in skiing and snowboarding accidents, despite accounting for only a small fraction of injuries overall. Head injuries make up 3 to 15% of all skiing and snowboarding related injuries, spinal injuries account for 1 to 13%, and peripheral nerve injuries constitute less than 1% of reported injuries. Improvements in equipment and technology, especially advances in binding technology, have resulted in decreased injury rates on the slopes overall, but neurologic injury rates have not decreased, and in fact appear to be increasing as a percentage of overall injuries and in absolute numbers. With advances in technology and slope maintenance, skiers and boarders progress to higher skill levels and faster speeds more rapidly than ever before. Great efforts have been focused on reducing extremity injuries in skiers and snowboarders, but until recently very little attention has been given to neurologic injury prevention on the slopes. Hopefully with increased awareness and the growing popularity of ski/snowboard helmets, we will begin to see head injury rates (and maybe even spine injury rates) decrease among skiers and snowboarders.
post #23 of 27
Now that is what I call an answer! Thanks Ella.
post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 
Yes thank you Ella.That was a detailed response if ever there was one.It seems most answers I have gotten say defintely a helmet for the youngster,if not also for my wife and I.Thank you all for your responses and any more will be appreciated
post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 
Bump
post #26 of 27
Thread Starter 
Anyone else have any feedback?Thank you
post #27 of 27
Hi Rinski,

I don't know if you saw this message below that I posted in another thread about helmets. I agree with others here about the importance of individual fit. Also, I would try to choose amongst one on the list below, evaluated and rated for safety. And pick up a couple for your wife and yourself while you're at it. When it was time to buy my daughter an adult-sized helmet because she had outgrown her kiddy one, my husband and I got them, too, partly because it was hard to justify to our daughter why she should wear one if we didn't. I'm really glad, because my helmet recently probably saved my life or kept me from vegetablehood. The benefits are definitely worth the unfortunate helmet-hair.

The Dec 2003 Consumer Reports had a review of ski helmets.

Some summary points:


Quote:
There are no federal safety standards for ski helmets, but
all the helmets we tested claim compliance (via a label or
sticker) with at least one of three industry helmet
standards for recreational skiing and snowboarding.
Those standards are from the European Committee for
Standardization, ASTM International, and the Snell
Memorial Foundation. All mandate tests for impact
absorption, retention-system (strap-and-buckle) strength,
and stability on the head, and also specify a minimum
head area the helmet must protect. ....

Judging by our tests, all helmets bearing a label or sticker
certifying compliance with industry standards don't
necessarily protect your head equally. That's a reason to
choose from among the first 10 models in the Ratings.

And their ratings:

1 Giro Nine
2 Giro Fuse
3 Leedom Scream (High Performance)
4 Leedom Limit (Youth Performance)
5 K2 Automatic
6 Uvex Hawk
7 Briko Forerunner
8 Carrera Big Air
9 Boeri Myto Air EB (discontinued)
10 Boeri Kameleon

Best short-shell helmets:
1 Giro
2 Giro

Best full-shell helmets:
3 Leedom

7 Briko

Likely to fit kids as young as age 4:
4 Leedom

Not recommended:
11 W Helmets W Ski w/Slider

12 Boeri Rage (matte-black shell)

Not acceptable:
Boeri Rage (high-gloss shell)
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