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A light hearted teaching moment

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
editors note: the actual way that Rusty teaches children is posted here
(you should actually view the above first)

By popular request (someone thought this was actually funny)

http://veepers.budweiser.com/service/RetrieveCard?id=NbX7Khz72rgjyQBNTY8F4W



Please address all complaints to JohnH - it's all his fault
post #2 of 10
Oh gosh, sometimes I have to bite my tongue not to sound like that to my 3.5 yo. Right now all he'll let me do is take him to the top of the learning slope and let him straight run.
post #3 of 10
good motivation technique! I like it.
post #4 of 10
My money is on the kid
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn
Oh gosh, sometimes I have to bite my tongue not to sound like that to my 3.5 yo. Right now all he'll let me do is take him to the top of the learning slope and let him straight run.
L2T,

That's pretty much what I was doing with this 3YO. The lower body coordination was not there for making wedges. We were both happy with getting a good straight run going. You gotta credit these kids for being pretty smart. Why do any work controlling speed when there's a big person around to do it for you? Or maybe we are just training future downhillers? I think I'll call this technique Direct to Straight Run, write a book (Train your kid to be an Olympic downhiller) and make millions.

And now my stupid question for the day... Can direct to parallel work for the "typical" 3 year old?
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
And now my stupid question for the day... Can direct to parallel work for the "typical" 3 year old?
I'm convinced that it can NOT. Not even just for the typical 3 year old, but for all but a very select few who are born with phisical skills well beyone most, and no concept of fear.

I consider my daughter pretty typical. But she does not get the idea of tipping both skis, and gets pretty freaked out at speed. Plus, in learning DTP, you have to be able to put together several concepts at once, such as allowing the ski to skid, not catching downhill edges, staying centered (or at least close - which is nearly impossible because of the instinct to brace against the hill).

That said, there are probably 2-5% of the kids out there, that if taught properly, would be able to do it.

But even if you consider that, some of those would not be taught DTP because the sense of security and speed control gained by a wedge is a comfort to parents who want to make sure their kids don't start making hard-wood christies or become a hood ornament to a car in the parking lot. Now, if I had Whistler or Breck beginner runs available to me, I might be more willing to try.
post #7 of 10
JohnH, is this for 3-year-olds or just kids up to a certain age?

My 8 year old went skiing with us this week. While she's been on skis a couple of times before, she hasn't really "skied" until this week. We had discussed tipping at home, and how skis work to turn the skier. On her first trip down the small slope next to the magic carpet at Keystone, she simply tipped. First one way, then the other. She arced RR tracks down the slope. While I yelped and clapped for her, a couple of the Breck instructors also commented on the carving she was doing.

She continued this for the rest of the time we were there, adding in shaping of turns with her inside ski when she moved up to the larger slope with the chairlift. I still need to work with her on completing turns (she got to flying down the hill, and was surprised to learn that some [like her mom] don't like to go fast!), but she's got the key skills already. I'm amazed, a bit shocked, and now wondering where she's going to take this! :
post #8 of 10

A single experience

I don't know about a 3 year old but here's one experience from a non-instructor.

Earlier this year I went with a friend to pick up his 5 year old, Will, from ski school and ski a few runs together. I had never seen Will ski but knew he was an agressive athletic kid. The (young) instructor's comment to the dad focused on his inability to "get his skies together and parallel."

I was surprised when I saw Will ski as his skills far surpassed what I would have guessed based on the intructor's comments. His biggest issue was not finishing his turns and picking up too much speed. As we skied I tried a simple progression with him. First we explored finishing turns. Then I taught him little jet turns in some soft (but relatively large moguls). It took a few tries as his first attempt was a jump before the mogul and the second after it. After that, though he got it pretty well and started to turn his skis in parallel in the air. After each jump we would continue to work on finishing the turn across the hill before finding another mogul to jump off of. Then I proposed to him the concept of letting the skis turn on their own instead of him trying to turn them, kind of like he was doing in the air on the mini-jet turns. Voila, he made the transformation from short incomplete wedge turns to completed parallel turns. Perhaps most importantly, over an apres ski hot chocolate his dad asked him what made the difference and his answer was that he learned how to let the skis turn him vs. him turning the skis.

I doubt this is a good conventional way to get where he ended up but it seemed to fit Will's agressive desires and nature and really worked for him.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
My 8 year old went skiing with us this week. While she's been on skis a couple of times before, she hasn't really "skied" until this week. We had discussed tipping at home, and how skis work to turn the skier. On her first trip down the small slope next to the magic carpet at Keystone, she simply tipped. First one way, then the other. She arced RR tracks down the slope. While I yelped and clapped for her, a couple of the Breck instructors also commented on the carving she was doing.


She continued this for the rest of the time we were there, adding in shaping of turns with her inside ski when she moved up to the larger slope with the chairlift. I still need to work with her on completing turns (she got to flying down the hill, and was surprised to learn that some [like her mom] don't like to go fast!), but she's got the key skills already. I'm amazed, a bit shocked, and now wondering where she's going to take this! :
Steve, I was posting at the same time. I see a lot of commonality in the experiences we are describing.
post #10 of 10
ssh,

I'm definitely just talking about 3 year olds. Maybe 3-4 year olds. My guess is that at 5yrs, the physical and cognitive abilities have improved enough that a much highr percentage of kids would be able to learn DTP. Then, when you get to about 8 years old, the percentage would again increase dramatically.

My evil and dastardly plan (for now, it may change next week) is that next season, I will be able to stop telling my daughter to "make an A" (her wedge - pizza was taken by her dance instructor) which is simply used for speed control right now, and just tell her to turn using the one turning foot, which I'm already doing, and let the inside foot just come along for the ride. My hope is that next season she will not be as afraid of gaining speed. During next season, I would teach her to use her edges more. Then the following season, when she is 5, I will have her start tipping the inside ski at initiation. We'll have to see if this schedule works or if it goes faster or slower. One advantage we have, is that we put her on rollerblades in the summer, which teaches her to point and tip both feet, and keeps her pretty centered, which is key to DTP.
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