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What Can I Do With Boots That are Too Large?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I recently purchased some Head WorldCup Ti's (2003-04 model) and am quite delighted with them. However, it would appear that they are about 1/2-1 size too large. I have not had them custom fitted as of yet. I'm thinking about taking them to Les Moise in Milwaukee for bootfitting. My question is whether bootfitters can do anything for you when the boot is too big? I know they can help with tight spots on boots that are too small, but can they do anything to help take up the space where the boot is too large?

I'm not going to purchase an entirely new set of boots this year so I either have to live with it or do some slight modification to make it better. Any suggestions or home-remedies out there?

Thanks,

Ben
post #2 of 16
Get some shims shaped like your foot and place underneath the liner (on top of the boot board). This will take up some volume in the shell. You can also duct tape the outside of the liner in the spots that you feel you have excess room. These aren't perfect solutions but when the boot is too big I think its about the best you can do.
post #3 of 16
1) if you don't have a custom footbed, there's a big volume eater right there and that alone could do it.

2) if you do have a custom footbed, you can use Bontex shims under the liner boot for overall forefoot/instep volume reduction, and adhesive padding around the liner boot to specifically tailor the volume reduction around the ankle and achilles, and even for the leg shaft.

3) a new zipfit or intuition custom liner boot -- the most expensive but almost sure to cure

the problem of going too far on any of these home mods is that you are getting further away from good feel for the ski. you might be able to get by and even with a new custom liner boot get a pretty precise fit, but you're still further away from the shell and zeppa and therefore further from the point at which your foot's supposed (by the boot designer) to interact with the boot
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 

Follow Up

Thank you RoundTurns. How/where do I get shims shaped like my feet?
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
So if I go to a bootfitter, they should be able to do something for me (custom footbed, etc.) and not just say "get new boots" ?
post #6 of 16
if they're worthy of their title, and the boot shell really isn't THAT much bigger than it ought to be, yes.

but if I was that fitter and I saw a way too huge shell for your foot, I'd probably be inclined to sell you a different boot and urge you to pitch those Heads to someone on eBay with a larger foot than yours. really depends on just how much "too big" we're talking about. and also, whether you have a custom footbed.

the Bontex shims I referred to are the same things roundturns is talking about. some cobblers have them, any good ski boot fitter should have them. if you end up using them, be sure to monitor their condition throughout the season. they're dense cardboard and shouldn't break down too easily, but they can if they remain soggy for long periods of time, eh?
post #7 of 16
If you want to purchase the Bontex shims yourself they are available at Tognar (www.tognar.com) for a few bucks and come in different sizes and thicknesses.
post #8 of 16
Forget the duct tape, the stuff you can buy from Tognar should help you out considerably. I can remember back in the mid 80's I bought a pair of Flexons, too stupid to shell size, and they were really tight in the store. Wore then around the house a week before heading to Copper Mountain and after 30 minutes I had to take them off as my feet would get numb. Anyway after the first day of skiing my feet were swimming in them and a boot tech gave me some shims to put under the liner and wished me luck. I couldn't believe that the liner could stretch that much and the shell was too large .

I know it varies from boot mfg to boot mfg. but after 25 years or longer of wearing a 27 shell and a footbed, I downsized to a 26 and life seems better. I have almost a finger in the shell (no liner) behind my heel. I think its pretty consistent that after skiing a standard liner you are going to gain at least a half a size.

Its tough to trust that the liner is going to stretch. Shell sizing is a must and too few shops I've been in do this.
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
if they're worthy of their title, and the boot shell really isn't THAT much bigger than it ought to be, yes.
I'm supposed to be in a size 24/24.5. I'm in a 25/25.5 boot. In your estimation, is that workable?

B
post #10 of 16
YO! you still haven't answered whether you have custom footbeds. if you don't, now is the time to find a skilled footbed molder near you -- and how near is going to be a function of reputation. I'd suggest PM to Arcmeister to find someone who can do this.

now, if you do already have footbeds, and want to try to do the boot mods yourself, I suppose you could try. I've skied in shells 1 size over before. Usually I've given up after losing a toenail or two. but here's how you can try to minimize the expense:

get to the Tognar website and get the following:

1) Bontex shims in both thicknesses, buy as many as you're comfortable with, I'd say at least 10 in each thickness but I'm a timesaver that way. at least 2 shims each thickness per boot for sure.

2) universal scissors

3) boot fitter's adhesive padding in 1/8 or 3/16 thickness, and I'd buy a piece about 24" x 24" or equivalent

go about using the Bontex shims one at a time, thinnest first, proceeding logically until you feel you have hit your vertical volume limit at the instep's lowest point on the shell. you can get creative here and use front-half-only shims if you really feel like there's too much vertical volume in the toe box. the point here is to eliminate the need to overtighten, which deforms the boot and makes it flex weird.

snug up the parts that feel loose by identifying where on the liner boot you're feeling insufficient security. cut the adhesive padding to mirror the spot... remember to orient the pad before you cut it, so that you're taking into account which side holds the adhesive. you can smooth the edges of the adhesive padding with an emery board (nail file) or similar abrasive. continue in this manner until you find the boot allows you to make desired moves without the foot moving excessively.

if you're going for the Lv II exam I'd suggest getting in lots of time making these boots work for you BEFORE skiing before an examiner. but that's just me, I'm not an instructor or coach...
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 

No Customs

Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
YO! you still haven't answered whether you have custom footbeds.
No custom footbeds. And I've been referred to the best around here by an examiner. I'll drop by and visit and get the boots custom fit this week.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
if you're going for the Lv II exam I'd suggest getting in lots of time making these boots work for you BEFORE skiing before an examiner. but that's just me, I'm not an instructor or coach...
I've got a week before my exam...cutting it close but I can get out and ski this week to break them in. Hopefully this should work well.

By the way, how did you lose toenails in a boot size too large?
post #12 of 16
boot too big = foot moves fore/aft

seems counterintuitive, I know, but trust me it's true. you have to be skiing lots of steeps and/or doing lots of drops/jumps. I was guilty of the former and not the latter.

PS if Arcmeister's not the person who recommended the footbed person, I'd suggest bouncing the idea off Arcmeister anyway. he's pretty serious about boot fit and alignment stuff and would know the top person for sure.
post #13 of 16
Making a boot too big work is a lot more ineffectual than fitting a boot too small. Get the correct shell or fight with the boats until you do.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sluff Vertigo
Making a boot too big work is a lot more ineffectual than fitting a boot too small. Get the correct shell or fight with the boats until you do.
true that. it will be fighting, both in the "trying to make 'em snug" department, and in the "trying to control the skis if your feet move around inside your boots" department.
post #15 of 16
Footbeds first as most here have said. Even the $ 30.00 generic ones will help if you don't want to spring for the big bucks.

Second---If they still aren't quite there---Get a pair of Dr Scholls Air Pillow Insoles (the el-cheapo foam things available at drug and dept stores) cut them to size and install. You fill find it warmer and it takes up about 1/2 size.

Third----shim under the liner as everybody here suggested.
post #16 of 16

DONT BOTHER! ITs a waste of time

OOOOH how I am sooooo passionate on this subject. This has happened to me twice now. The first boots I bought were two sizes too big. I had several shops tell me that yes it was too big, buy a new boot. Yet they were still willing to try the patch jobs as are mentioned in this forum. Thinking I was saving money with the patch, I fought them for a couple years and ended up spending more money and time than the boots were worth.

The second time the boot shop sold me the correct size, at least according to the boot chart. However the cuffs were too big which I kept tell them. They kept patching. I finally got the right size shell which they said was too small. Guess what? They work now.

Case in point. If you think they are too big(Your the only one that can really know), then dump them. Trust me, your time and money are better spent. PAtch jobs are for people stuck in the middle of nowwhere and struggling to get home. IS that YOU?
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