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Add my kid to the list of boarder road kill

post #1 of 89
Thread Starter 
So, our last day of vacation out at Beaver Creek. My son (age 9, level 3), niece (level 3) and I are out skiing Flatops at Beaver Creek, a very easy green run, probably 250 yards wide and virtually no one else on the slope. We were taking turns being the leader and skiing down in the middle section of the run with at least 80-100 yards of wide open slope on either side of us. No blind spots, plenty of sunny skies, and wide open terrain. As I was leading them down the mountain, I hear a thud and then my kid crying. Four boarders had apparently decided that their only path down the mountain was through us. Again, 80-100 yards of wide open slope on either side of us. We couldn;t have been more visable if we had flares on. We weren't changing directions or taking up a large amount of the slope.

As my kid couldn't ski anymore, I waved down the ski information persons so they could get the ski patrol. The ski information personnel weren't even going to make an accident report until I demanded one. However, they didn't ask any questions, they just had the boarders give their own statements. Since no one else saw the incidentm (as there was no one else on the slope), I guess they deemed it an "accident". To my knowledge, they were never asked why they chose the path they did when they could have gone around us incredibly easily. My niece and I didn't see it because we were just ahead of my son at the time.

My kid is 4 feet 4 inches and 62 pounds. The Boarder was about 6 feet 2 inches and 210 pounds and about 22 years old. When he hit my kid, my kid flew out of his skis and landed about 8-10 feet below his skis. Fortunately, the board must have hit my kid square on the knee as there doesn't appear to be any damage beyond a nasty bruise, swelling and associated pain. A little lower, a little higher or a little more to the side and it would have been much worse.

The ski patrol eventually arrived and performed quite well. Despite the pain, my kid enjoyed enjoyed the ride down in the sled and I had to ski my @#@ off just to keep up. He spent the rest of our last day on the sofa being iced down.

You gotta love the moron's excuse for why he hit my kid. "It was a demo board and I was having trouble controling it." Hmmm, perhaps then you have given more clearance than 2 centimeters when you tried to pass my son?

I know the snowboarder didn't mean to hit my kid. But I will never know why they felt the need to ski within inches of us, especially if they lacked control, when the slope was wide open.

This accident was so avoidable with just a modicum of common sense. Unless it's happened to you, you can't imagine how horrible it feels to see your kid lying on the snow, head facing down the hill, holding his knee crying up at you.

So, exactly what does it take to have a ski pass pulled. Must the victim die? (He asked rhetorically).

After exchanging obscentities with the snowboarder (quite good ones my son tells me), we did shake hands as we left. Again, I know he didn't do it on purpose. My parting words were nothing more than "in the future, please try and give people more room when you're passing them."
post #2 of 89
Sorry to hear about your son and I'm glad he wasn't more seriously hurt.

You can forget about this punk being more considerate in the future. Why? No penalty on his part. While you're here venting, he's somewhere else having a good laugh over the whole deal. And, it'll happen again when the opportunity arises, maybe with more dire results for some unlucky child.

As far as the resorts go, I've come to the conclusion that they care less than the punks do.

I hope nothing like this happens to my kids on the slopes. But if it does, I'm probably going to make the Evening News.
post #3 of 89
sorry to hear that, skidmo, and I'm glad that there were no permanent physical injuries.

more pass pulling needs to occur with reckless sliders -- whether they're on skis, or on a snowboard. when enforcement is more than a threat, people have some impetus to think about their actions.

on the other hand, if you just threaten and announce the threat, people continue.

Montana's efforts to curb drunk driving have been ludicrous. The most recent attempts were 2 years ago, mounting a billboard campaign that threatens "Montana is TOUGH on DUI" but we never see many convictions on DUI; and now the banning of open containers.

These bandaid approaches don't fix anything. Enforcement is what makes people think about the consequences. Enforcement needs to occur when violation occurs. Not threats of enforcement. Real enforcement.
post #4 of 89
Well said, Gonz!

Some mountain patrols definitely seem to show more authority than others, too. Here in the east, there are certainly mountains where a perception exists that if you endanger others (as a skier, boarder, speeder in slow areas, recklessness), you can expect to lose your ticket. I always feel better when I hear a bit of a buzz on the hill, "the patrol's ripping left and right today."
post #5 of 89
skidmo, so sorry to hear this! You didn't know this, but there are laws on the books in Colorado that could have come into play in this situation. I would have pushed much harder than you did with the patrol and other members of the resort staff. I may have even asked for law enforcement to be summoned.

I'm glad that your son enjoyed the ride down and will likely be none the worse for the experience. But, I'd like to see the boarder appropriately penalized.
post #6 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
... I'd like to see the boarder appropriately penalized.
Same here! I just can't believe the guy got away with it!!
post #7 of 89
Skidmo,

I guess it's good that you kept some composure. I'd probably have gone into a rage and beat the pulp out of the guy.

Glad to hear your boy didn't get too hurt.

That does sound rather flakey that patrol just let him go without any reprocussions. I'd be tempted to talk to the patrol director to find out what their policy is for this type of situation.
post #8 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
more pass pulling needs to occur with reckless sliders -- whether they're on skis, or on a snowboard. when enforcement is more than a threat, people have some impetus to think about their actions.
The end of the world is near..................................

I agree with Gonzo
post #9 of 89
Disappointing news Skidmo... my apologies on behalf of the moron who couldn't slide in control. Kinda makes you wonder if a ski pole can be wrapped around someone's neck without breaking doesn't it? There isn't any acceptable excuse for taking out a kid. See small ones- slow down and go wide.

Hope your son heals quick!
post #10 of 89
Glad your son is OK.

What can we all expect from a generation that puts peoples lives in jeopardy while driving and skiing/riding? Don't have as much problem if they are challenging themselves and risking their own lives but there is no excuse for hitting someone on a wide open, easy run. Of course, if they get into trouble and need to be rescued they might put others lives at risk.

If the jerk could not handle a demo board then he needs to slow down...and get a lesson when he gets down. I demo skis all the time and have never had any problem skiing the same as usual. If I am having any problems I just throttle back until I feel comfortable on them.

Unfortunately, he will probably not become a concerned citizen until he has children of his own...and maybe not even then.
post #11 of 89
I hope the your child gets better soon.
Some where isn't written, you must ski/ board in control at all times?
Being a demo board or demo skis is the lamest dumb ass excuse i have heard yet. If you can't keep control, slow it down, better yet don't ski or board above you abailty.
Get a copy of the report from patrol, then consider contacting a lawyer, see what your options are. I would do the same if it was my child
Shoot the boarders , feed em to patrol. They need to eat too:
post #12 of 89
Demo board? At that part of the mountain, what difference does it make? Dude was probably trying to scare your boy and lost control. Grrrrrr! : :
post #13 of 89
The problem is almost always Young Dumb Guys (15 - 25 yrs old) whether on snowboards, skis, or driving I-70 here in Colorado. My wife who is a responsible and skilled middle aged snowboarder was hit by an out of control spring breaker on skis who actually cut her binding straps in half when he skied over her board and knocked her down, ending her day on the mountain. Lets bring attention to the real problem, irresponsible young males and stop the prejudicial flaming of boarders with post titles like "... list of boarder road kill".
post #14 of 89
Sorry to hear about the young fella and glad he's ok .This is why my wife and I have been vigilant in running what you could call an offensive defense , I hang back and do what ever it takes to protect our girls . I find that it's easy to redirect most around the kids by taking the same path as the boarder/rider , most don't brush as close to a man as they do kids or women . Some may consider this as cutting off or risky but I am still the downhill skier and the couple of hits I have taken that took me out would have been a bad scene if it was one of the girls .
post #15 of 89
Few years back I was practicing wedge turns (as part of school drills), alone and "out of uniform.

I was assulted by three boarders (17/18'ish), first male hit my tips, second male went over my tails and the third, a female, reached out and gave me a slap on the head.

What they failed to notice was the P-40 GS boards ..... very fast little puppies. They got quite a shock when I was at the bottom with them and they found out that poles can leave very nasty scratches and gouges on them purty' boards. One ended up with a sore mid section when he made a move toard me. I think it was the slap by the female that put me over the edge.

Memo: You can NOT throw a front thrust kick with a ski on. You can toss a wicked side kick however!
post #16 of 89
Yuki---learn a tip roll---you can easily catch em in the face with that move !
post #17 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcahill
The problem is almost always Young Dumb Guys (15 - 25 yrs old) whether on snowboards, skis, or driving I-70 here in Colorado. My wife who is a responsible and skilled middle aged snowboarder was hit by an out of control spring breaker on skis who actually cut her binding straps in half when he skied over her board and knocked her down, ending her day on the mountain. Lets bring attention to the real problem, irresponsible young males and stop the prejudicial flaming of boarders with post titles like "... list of boarder road kill".
You are right.

Many "kids" are out of control....and many young male adults are still juveniles whether on skis or boards or driving their cars/trucks. Unfortunately, none of us are immortal and they often do not excercise good judgement which is expected of an adult.
post #18 of 89
For some reason, they seem to get a thrill by passing people so close. I tap them with my pole if I have time to react, and the shocked looks I get are something to behold. They plainly don't feel there is any problem with passing so close, so long as they don't actually hit you. And if they do hit you, it was an accident, so it's OK, right?

I also think they do it more to women and kids than they do to men.
post #19 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimeral
You are right.

Many "kids" are out of control....and many young male adults are still juveniles whether on skis or boards or driving their cars/trucks. Unfortunately, none of us are immortal and they often do not excercise good judgement which is expected of an adult.
Well said. However,some adults never quite reach maturity.:
post #20 of 89
Wow, I don't know whats going on with that patrol. This would be one of those situations where I would hope that the snowboarder had a seasons pass, cause I would have pulled it for at least a month.

At my mountain we have the call on whose pass to pull and for how long, and we know that management will back us up.
post #21 of 89
Want to make an impact? Write a letter to the director of skiing and the board of directors of Beaver Creek. Explain what happened and make sure you mention the names of the B.C. personell you talked to. Explain your displeasure with the whole circumstance and mention that next trip you'll take your prescious dollars to another Resort. I guarantee you will get an answer within a few days and maybe some compensation. If no compensation, at least you will have the satisfaction of telling them exactly what you think of the control at their resort.
post #22 of 89
They don't have to be young or a boarder. At the top of the poma lift at Copper today, there was this middle aged dude on skis who was particularly smitten with one of the attractive ladies in our group.

When skied down one of the bump runs in the bowls, he came barreling down the hill in a classic neanderthal manner, knocking over our instructor. Later that day, he almost knocked over the lady with whom he was smitten.:
post #23 of 89
Yeah, well skiers also do stupid things too .... BUT (and I am really screaming here) it always seems to be the d!@# snowboarders that nearly take out my children .. today it was the youngest child: he is 8 years old, 55 pounds, 4'6". We are not talking about a bruiser that could take a hit. Yet today a male snowboarder about 6'2" and easily over 200 forced him to duck under a tape and enter the NASTAR course to avoid being wiped out. And it was intentional -- no question. Only five minutes earlier a doppleganger on a Burton rode across my tails as I was stopped with my kids near the start of the NASTAR course explaining faster starts -- but well off the course. He used me as a gate. : These individuals will doubtless exercise the same judgment while driving on a icy road some night. I hope that they will be alone and it will not involve oncoming traffic.

There is an obvious actuarial explanation for this: it is generally younger males and females that ride, and at least for the males of the species, until they are 25 they have a handicap in making good decisions -- it is not by coincidence that insurance rates on this group are much higher than for other groups: they are statistically more likely than older people to do boneheaded things and hurt themselves and others. I am not biased and don't flame me with the bunk that one cannot make generalizations --a generalization is the only way to characterize a large number of people. Failure to do so is not "tolerance" but rather a lack of critical analysis and judgment.

For every rider that you see in control and carving nice turns, there seems to be 10 teens trying to impress their friends. These same jerks are also to be found on skis, but where you are used as a gate by a moron on skis, you know it was done on purpose. Why is it that snowboarders get a "free ride" on being out of control? Out of control is exactly that -- and reckless. It does seem to me that a skier with even a little experience is in far better control (probably something to do with having a total of four edges to work with) that all but the best riders.

Now here is the hardest part: I love to ride. About 10 years ago I took a whole week of lessons learning how to ride the pow at Copper Mountain. There is nothing better than riding in powder ... it is the eternal wave. But on the East Coast where good conditions largely consist of hardpack and boilerplate -- you know that particular sound? Not pretty. Now I find my resentment towards snowboarders rising to the point that I cannot see myself ever going back -- at least not on this coast. A further element of my confusion is that perhaps my oldest and dearest friend rides.

I know that this was a rant -- but I needed to get it off my chest and when I saw this thread ... and given what happened today.... My sincere apologies to considerate, careful riders. However, if you are the punk that had "fun" with my child, or the dude that used me as a gate, I guarantee you that I can catch you ... but then you wouldn't even try that crap if I didn't have kids with me, would you? No. And an 8 year old makes a juicy target -- you studly dude, you. Ugh. Bile. Venom.
post #24 of 89
My lawyer advises me not to say what would happen to any 200lb 6'2" jack*** who intentionally terroized my child.
post #25 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
Few years back I was practicing wedge turns (as part of school drills), alone and "out of uniform.

I was assulted by three boarders (17/18'ish), first male hit my tips, second male went over my tails and the third, a female, reached out and gave me a slap on the head.

What they failed to notice was the P-40 GS boards ..... very fast little puppies. They got quite a shock when I was at the bottom with them and they found out that poles can leave very nasty scratches and gouges on them purty' boards. One ended up with a sore mid section when he made a move toard me. I think it was the slap by the female that put me over the edge.

Memo: You can NOT throw a front thrust kick with a ski on. You can toss a wicked side kick however!


Yuki - You might be interested in this old thread, http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?p=223946 ?

...particularly posts #9 and #27 by yours truly ...

I'm not much of a drinking guy, but if I were, I'd definitely raise a pint in your direction. If bullies such as these never face any consequences for their actions, their actions will only get worse. I always wonder if there was a responsible and effective dad at home when kids like these were growing up.

Tom / PM
post #26 of 89
The Cure for rude boarders? Just come to Alta!

L
post #27 of 89
Ok folks, this is some funny stuff. The original poster admitted to not seeing the event at all, nor anyone else. He and his children were on a green slope, and were hit from behind. The hitter claimed to be on a "demo" snowboard.

Does anyone else perchance think that perhaps this person on a "demo" snowboard, on a green slope, was perhaps learning to snowboard? I'm not sure about y'all, but I've seen my child get a bit out of control while attempting to learn to ski.

The whole funny part of reading the thread was the responses. The quick condemnation of "those evil snowboarders." Trust me, I had a huge grin on my face while reading the response of "I'd contact a lawyer if I was you." Hahahaha, a lawyer? You are kidding me right? The child has a bruise on his knee, and you want someone sued? Next time anyone complains about lift ticket prices I want y'all to remember that.

Don't get me wrong, I feel for the parent and I'd be pissed as well. But, I'd probably realize that shit happens. There are a lot of people out there skiing, collisions are bound to happen.

BobMc
post #28 of 89
I nearly was taken out by a high speed skier a few years ago at Whistler. I was waiting for a friend next to a "slow skiing" sign when a young kid flew off a bump and came within inches of me. He would of hit me if I hadn't ducked. I gave him a few Sicilian curses and asked him if he wanted to talk to the ski patrol about his skiing. He declined and took off.

I followed, and he made the mistake of going in for lunch. And then he made a second mistake of not locking up his skis. I wonder if he ever found his skis again. I hid them real good!! It's a cheap but effective strategy.

JonnyMo
post #29 of 89
Skidmo, I hope your son recovers nicely and is back on the snow soon.

I agree with Lars. A stern letter to each board member of Beaver Creek would certainly get their attention. (If they have any spine). It would show that you understand their fiduciary responsibility to the resort and its customers.

Also, we should stop most of the apologies for stereotyping. Prejudices (judgment based on history is not prejudicial) are evolved from experiences; they aren't created in a vacuum--much to the disappointment of the P.C. social engineers. There are good reasons (prejudicial? no!) why we readily pet Cocker Spaniels and tend to avoid Pit Bulls.

Same for boarders.

While generally treating a group a particular way based on the history of many of its members may seem unfair in our hypersensitive modern social order, it is the most economical and effective way to change behavior of each member of the group.

If a few members of the third grade class have been unruly and the entire class is denied recess, then tremendous social pressure is exerted to get the malcontents in line. Behavior is changed for the better, everyone learns a valuable lesson, and the cost of the lesson is very minimal.

Another consideration: Profiling works. And is most economical. Ditto the change pressure on the profiled group.





OMG! HarvardTiger has posted! Flame away..........
post #30 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarvardTiger
we should stop most of the apologies for stereotyping. Prejudices (judgment based on history is not prejudicial) are evolved from experiences; they aren't created in a vacuum--much to the disappointment of the P.C. social engineers. There are good reasons (prejudicial? no!) why we readily pet Cocker Spaniels and tend to avoid Pit Bulls.
Duck, HT, sharp projectiles may be headed your way.
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