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Wifey Wiped out! - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhysicsMan
After I check that he is OK, I ask him if he knows how to turn, and he says "No". He does this with absolutely no malice, sarcasm or embarrassment. I then ask him (while he still is in this position), if he thinks that turning might be something useful to know, and he says something like, "Maybe, but wouldn't it slow me down?". Amazing ... absolutely f-ing amazing.

That's what these kids really seem to think skiing and riding is all about, so what can you do other than be vigilant.

Tom / PM

PS - I eventually let him regain his dignity and let his board slide back down my poles.
I think this is one of the main problems...many new boarders think that they can just ride a lift and come down without knowing how to stop or turn. I think this is a more wide spread problem than skiers doing the same (I do recall seeing and hearing of a few new skiers doing this though, mostly teenage males).
Another problem is boarders who do not use or have retention straps (runaway). I have seen, and even chased down a few boards sailing down the hill from boarders without straps. I have also seen such boards hit people (one last Thursday at Wachusett hit a middle age man in the back injuring him quite seriously).

Another is the boarders taking the board off on the hill without keeping the strap on or securing the board. These take off and become rockets on the slopes as they follow the fall-line.
post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
My Wife has been couch potato since she got back from Whiteface this past week. Had exrays yesterday. Nothing broken in her right shoulder but for sure a torn rotator cuff. Numbness radiating from her fingers and thumb going up her wrist.

How did this happen? Wiped out by a snowboarder. She a good skier and also boards so she's a little defensive about snowboarders but was quite upset.

Seems like it's always snowboarders running into people.Why?
ask anyone from ESA Big Sky about the moronic snowboarder who almost smacked me at high speed in the Clown Faces Bowl below Challenger. too many boarders ignore their "heel side" blind spot and just charge ahead.
post #33 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Yesterday, my mother in law got hit by a snowboarder at Okemo. This is happening all too often.
Sorry to hear that, Phil!

Where the heck is the ski patrol in all this? At Gore Mountain, the patrol would be ripping tickets left and right to keep a bit of civility on the hill. It seems like at some hills the Patrol just has more confidence, more power. Having been on the receiving end of a scolding at Gore (after a "yard sale," a patroller yelled at me to "pick up the pieces at get moving"), in hindsight I appreciate it.

I don't want to get down on Patrol, but I often feel stunned at what they seem to let people get away with. Maybe they're in a tough position, maybe they need to err on the side of tolerance, but sometimes I wonder!
post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Yesterday, my mother in law got hit by a snowboarder at Okemo. This is happening all too often.
Sorry, couldn't resist the earlier quip. Hope the good lady is fine, of course.
post #35 of 48
Just to add to this - a boarder friend of mine was hit by a boarder (female this time) and knocked off line and into a pile of rocks - all at lowish speed and during my friend's lesson.

Cracked elbow and a dent in his helmet as if someone had stuck a pencil about a half inch into it - he bought a new helmet before going back out a couple of days later.

It probably didn't really save his life - it did save having his skull leak blood all over the snow (sorry, slush - this was Whistler peak) though.
post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by wbroun
Sorry to hear that, Phil!

Where the heck is the ski patrol in all this? At Gore Mountain, the patrol would be ripping tickets left and right to keep a bit of civility on the hill. It seems like at some hills the Patrol just has more confidence, more power. Having been on the receiving end of a scolding at Gore (after a "yard sale," a patroller yelled at me to "pick up the pieces at get moving"), in hindsight I appreciate it.

I don't want to get down on Patrol, but I often feel stunned at what they seem to let people get away with. Maybe they're in a tough position, maybe they need to err on the side of tolerance, but sometimes I wonder!
Actually, a Patroller saw the whole thing and pulled the kids ticket! Her and my wife went right down and bought helmets.
post #37 of 48

JohnH

That's the best theory I've heard so far. I always thought that trying to see just how close a boarder could get to you was part of the game. Now it appears that they just don't belong up on the hill.

BTW - my area has one (only 1) trail that is CLOSED to snowboarders. The head of ski patrol was on a mission yesterday and had patrollers and security stationed on the trail. Mind you there is a sign at the top that says "No Snowboards Allowed" -AND- there was a sign posted at the lift that said lift tickets would be pulled.As the boarders came down, they stopped them and took their lift tickets. I'm not sure what they did with season pass holders.

Needless to say...lots of tickets were pulled.

I skied that run 3 times in the afternoon and encountered borders twice. I stopped both of them and reminded them that the trail was closed to boarders and that lift tickets were being pulled. They both said the exact same thing. "I was following somebody and I didn't know where I was going."

Yeah...RIGHT!
post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomic_918
BTW - my area has one (only 1) trail that is CLOSED to snowboarders.
Yeah...RIGHT!
Question: how many hills that allow boarding restrict boarders from certain trails? I've never seen this anywhere, but it sounds like a good compromise.

david
post #39 of 48
Lars,

Dude sorry to here about wifey hope all goes well. Her injury sounds like mine from two seasons back. I did not tear the rotator but did have a brachial plexus nerve injury which accounted for the numbness. Six weeks of rehab and a year and a hald of weight training and it still get sore sometime. Shoulder injuries suck but man you know that.

Best wishes to wifey,'


Ed
post #40 of 48
Quote:
Seems like it's always snowboarders running into people.Why?
I wonder if some of the "my beach" and "my break" territorial type attitude has migrated from surfers to snow boarders. Growing up I always heard alot of stories about people being surfed over, by people not wanting others on "their" waves.
post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by teachskiljp
I think this is one of the main problems...many new boarders think that they can just ride a lift and come down without knowing how to stop or turn. I think this is a more wide spread problem than skiers doing the same (I do recall seeing and hearing of a few new skiers doing this though, mostly teenage males).
Another problem is boarders who do not use or have retention straps (runaway). I have seen, and even chased down a few boards sailing down the hill from boarders without straps. I have also seen such boards hit people (one last Thursday at Wachusett hit a middle age man in the back injuring him quite seriously).

Another is the boarders taking the board off on the hill without keeping the strap on or securing the board. These take off and become rockets on the slopes as they follow the fall-line.
I chase down those boards sailing down the hill, stop them, and chuck them deep into the trees. Go find your damn board. You're lucky it didn't hit anyone.
post #42 of 48
A couple of years ago at K-Mart, I was standing to the side of a green trail watching my wife turn as she approached me. A female boarder clipped her and sent her down, and then the boarder hit me, though she didn't knock me down. However, she was wedged between myself and a berm at the side of the trail.

I just stood there smiling at her waiting for the apology or other mea culpa that surely must have been forthcoming. But no. She started raging at me about getting out of her way, calling me a F-ing A-hole etc. Wow.
post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerpSKI
A couple of years ago at K-Mart, I was standing to the side of a green trail watching my wife turn as she approached me. A female boarder clipped her and sent her down, and then the boarder hit me, though she didn't knock me down. However, she was wedged between myself and a berm at the side of the trail.

I just stood there smiling at her waiting for the apology or other mea culpa that surely must have been forthcoming. But no. She started raging at me about getting out of her way, calling me a F-ing A-hole etc. Wow.
This almost happened to me this fall at Kmart. I was literally standing three feet from a tree when a snowboarder decided it was prudent to ride between the tree and I.

The last time I was actually involved in an incident there was about 5 years ago, as I avoid the place during peak times like the plague. That incident involved me very narrowly missing a middle aged ONY wearing the entire North Face catalog including 3000 cubic inch pack, on Outer Limits. I was zipperlining down the hill when he simply skied in front of me, zig zagging across the hill. There were words shouted, and to this day, I maintain that it isn't my responsibility to stop for idiots on expert terrain.

I seriously suspect that many of the people that are being hit are poorly choosing the time and place in which they ride or ski, and have failed to develop a strategy to avoid the risk.

You are much safer skiing expert terrain than you are skiing gaper Kmart blue and green terrain. If you can't avoid the gaper terrain, hit up somewhere like Bromley instead of Kmart. The difference in attitude is extreme.
post #44 of 48
Just spent 4 days skiing in Utah. Three of the days we were at areas that don't allow knuckledraggers. It was heaven and we really noticed the difference at the area that did allow them. I think I will be going to Utah more frequently and especially to those areas that are skier only.
post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingman
The last time I was actually involved in an incident there was about 5 years ago, as I avoid the place during peak times like the plague. That incident involved me very narrowly missing a middle aged ONY wearing the entire North Face catalog including 3000 cubic inch pack, on Outer Limits. I was zipperlining down the hill when he simply skied in front of me, zig zagging across the hill. There were words shouted, and to this day, I maintain that it isn't my responsibility to stop for idiots on expert terrain.
NO NO NO.

Let me be very clear. You are wrong. If you can't avoid someone downhill of you at the speed you are going, you are not an expert and do not deserve to be on that trail, no matter how stupid or aimless their actions.

I saw a situation very similar to yours on the Highline lift at Vail. This lift serves only black moguls. It was late in the afternoon, and the sun was shining down the plane of the hill. It was beautiful. Think Outer Limits, but two times as long and steeper, so long you can't see the top from the bottom and beautiful black bumps the whole way.

An expert was zipperlining the top section before the first headwall - BLAM BLAMBLAM BLAM. Snow flying, backlit by the sun, the whole bit. Even I'm not that good.

A novice skis aimlessly and in the backseat down beside the line the expert was taking, and (whump) falls literally ten feet in front of him. I thought for sure the expert was going to hit the novice.

Not a chance. A slight, quick edgeset and the expert simply doubled the moguls over and slightly to the left of the fallen novice, a slight change of line. He never stopped, never were there "words shouted". The expert never stopped, and continued on into the fog on the valley floor, keeping up his punishing rhythm.

Your words are those of a not-all-that-advanced skier, and let me tell you why.

If someone forces an expert to change their line and thereby prevents them from finishing a difficult trick or gnarly line, the expert has the presence of mind to change directions and line fluidly and without danger, no matter the speed, direction, or suddenness of the incoming skier. In your run on Outer Limits, you should have been able to avoid the guy without thinking. Instead, you allowed it to affect your thinking and your line adversely.

The not-all-that-advanced, on the other hand, fixes a set line in their head and can only follow it, not adapt on the fly because their skills just aren't there yet.

Work on your awareness of the things around you, because that's what makes a real expert skier.
post #46 of 48
I have been hit by three skiers this season alone. two while teaching...one was a friend I was sking with. The teaching incidents don't worry me too much, they were in a lesson and learning control (in this case the hard way).

My friend on the other hand is a different story. I was the downhill rider, making nice rythmic, arcing turns on my alpine snowboard. She was (we think)trying to keep up, and virtually staightlining. I was on toeside edge, coming across the mountainand had just turned my head to check my blindside before transitioning to heelside when she came right over my nose. She fell fell so hard she came out of her boot (another problem altogether). She had a concussion from the impact (no helmet). She blames me for the collision.

This incident works to two points on this thread. First the impact. I see many threads about people getting hit by snowboarders here on epic (and other forums) It seems we are all in agreement that there are bad skiers and snowboarders who are dangerous on the hill. these are the kids who are straightlining, and out of control. While a concern, many of us once were that kid. Then there are the beginning snowboarders. These kids sideslip down the hill, or dio the falling leaf, and ride very stiff. The primary problem with these guys is their perception that " Snowboarding is easier than skiing, I don't need a lesson" and a perception that snowboarding is still new, and everyone is self taught. Another problem is that snowboarding has traditionally been more affordable, and a way for a person who may not have the means to pay for lessons to get out there on the hill with their friends. Advanced snowboarders generally make differently shaped turns that skiers expect. I know that is the case especially for alpine boarders who will often use the whole hill, and frequently even bring a turn all the way around so as to be headed slightly uphill at the completion of the turn. Completing turns is a skill taught to both skiers and riders as a means of speed control without slipping the turn. Bear in Mind, I am not defending snowboarders for hitting a downhill skier, just as I would not defend a skier for hititng a downhill rider, However, I think that we all need to increase our awareness of what the other people are doing and are capable of in order to avoid collisions.

and now the helmet issue. It will not help you over 15 mph (or 18 as stated above). So what. If My friend had been wearing a helmet, I wouldn't have spent that evening in the ER with her, and she might remember that she went skiing that night. I have Broken two helmets in my day, and consider myself extremely lucky. (as I am not dead, it could be concluded that I was not going to fast...In both cases I fell due to terrain (and I was on skis)). To not wear a helmet is inane. they are light, vented, warm, stylish. I cannot count the number of times that I knocked my head on lift or snow, and thought..."thank god for my brain bucket". And furthermore. If you crack your skull, It gives patrol something to put the mess in...
post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlb
NO NO NO.
Feel quite strongly, eh?
Quote:
Let me be very clear. You are wrong. If you can't avoid someone downhill of you at the speed you are going, you are not an expert and do not deserve to be on that trail, no matter how stupid or aimless their actions.
Of course, I did avoid said idiot.

Quote:
blah blah blah you aren't an expert.
Why thanks. We agree on something.

I'll bet you are the cat's pajamas though. :

I stopped in that situation rather than changed line because I couldn't be 100 percent positive that no one was in a blind spot just uphill of me. It was a very crowded peak day. It isn't safe to change bumplines mid run on a hill where many people are zipperlining bumps at speed. Thats just poor etiquette as well as being unsafe.

And if jumping to conclusions were a sport, you'd be a winner. The "words shouted" didn't come out of my mouth. Mr. North Face was very angry with me for skiing so quickly straight down the fall line of such a difficult run, and let me know so in his New York vernacular.
post #48 of 48
Last weekend my 35 y.o. wife (who is a great skier) was looking up the hill at our friend while going about 30 through a beginner zone and demolished this not-so-poor shlup from Hollywood who looked like it was his 2nd or 3rd time on skis...her excuse..."Can't help it, I'm a Gemini!"

Could you imagine the carnage a Gemini Snowboarder must leave behind?!?
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