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Wifey Wiped out!

post #1 of 48
Thread Starter 
My Wife has been couch potato since she got back from Whiteface this past week. Had exrays yesterday. Nothing broken in her right shoulder but for sure a torn rotator cuff. Numbness radiating from her fingers and thumb going up her wrist.

How did this happen? Wiped out by a snowboarder. She a good skier and also boards so she's a little defensive about snowboarders but was quite upset.

Seems like it's always snowboarders running into people.Why?
post #2 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
My Wife has been couch potato since she got back from Whiteface this past week. Had exrays yesterday. Nothing broken in her right shoulder but for sure a torn rotator cuff. Numbness radiating from her fingers and thumb going up her wrist.

How did this happen? Wiped out by a snowboarder. She a good skier and also boards so she's a little defensive about snowboarders but was quite upset.

Seems like it's always snowboarders running into people.Why?
As was my wife once, she was fortunate and only a broken pole. Scary stuff, being hit is one of the main reasons I am thinking about a helmet.
post #3 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
Seems like it's always snowboarders running into people.Why?
Now Lars, you know from reading the other threads that it's not all of the snowboarder's fault that some run into people.

Because most of them are sitting in the middle of the damn slope and several others are sitting in front of the lift entrance. It's just the 2 coming down the hill that are the problem.

On a more serious note, I sure hope your wife is okay.
post #4 of 48
Sorry to hear about the wreck , and your right about "always snowboarders " I got hit today and there was only five of us on the freakin run . I got a glimpse of something to my right and was able to deflect him off , he wasn't to happy with the results.
post #5 of 48
Bummer. Nothing that a specialist and a scalpel can't fix. Hope it goes well.

There's getting hit by an uncontrolled slider, but there's also lots of cases where the person gets hit because of the way they entered a run or started a downhill movement without being aware of who's coming from above.
post #6 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
.....being hit is one of the main reasons I am thinking about a helmet.
Ditto....

Steve
post #7 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Betaracer
Bummer. Nothing that a specialist and a scalpel can't fix. Hope it goes well.

There's getting hit by an uncontrolled slider, but there's also lots of cases where the person gets hit because of the way they entered a run or started a downhill movement without being aware of who's coming from above.

She been around enough to know that Beta. No, she was comming down the middle. Said it was the usual ice at Whiteface. Didn't see it comming and she said there was no where to go to avoid it anyhow.

MRI on Tuesday, Specialist on Friday. Long time to wait but no choice as Dr's busy these days. I've had major surgery on both shoulders. I know the pain she is going through. And, now she knows what I went through. Ironic isn't it.
post #8 of 48
Thread Starter 
Asfar as a helmet goes. She only wears on while riding the board. I was the first at my resort to start wearin a helmet. After ten years and no longer patrolling, i haven't worn it the past year and a half unless I'm skiing rocks and chutes, hike to stuff. There was a guy killed at Seamboat while I was out there. Didn't save him as the helmet cracked in half.

I was a long time advocate of helmets on this website. Not anymore.
post #9 of 48
Lars, Helmets have limits, but can definitely work in protecting the head against ground hits, glancing blows from branches, chair lifts or skier/boarder collisions. Just because they can't protect against all contingencies is not reason to reject them altogether.

I got hit by a boarder for the first time last Saturday. In my case, A lighter skier, or one taking the hit in the back, would have been seriously hurt regardless of helmet. Glad I had a helmet that deflected the blow. I saw him comming and actually caught him in a bear hug. Knocked me out of both skis, but we both stayed standing. BTW props to Marker for sending a replacement binding under warranty (snowboard sheared off the top and DIN window).
post #10 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
As was my wife once, she was fortunate and only a broken pole. Scary stuff, being hit is one of the main reasons I am thinking about a helmet.
Why do people wait for accidents to happen before the purchase a helmet?
GET A HELMET ASAP! It only takes one bad accident to ruin a good day and/or a life.
post #11 of 48
Lars I hope she has a speedy recovery.
post #12 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
\

Seems like it's always snowboarders running into people.Why?
I think it comes from the poor heelside vision and lack of a hockey stop. I saw one plow into a patroller last week and knock him out of both skis. We were both dressed in red with white crosses. The patroller, the toughest 70 year old I know, went up like a second baseman and was unhurt. The boarder had a bloody mouth.

Hope your wife recovers fast!
post #13 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
... Seems like it's always snowboarders running into people.Why?
I'm real sorry, Lars. Hope she recovers fast. As far as your question goes, I'm very interested in this myself.

I hope some Bears will reply on this question because I just can't understand it. I almost got locomotived by a huge snowboarder yesterday -- he came from my periphery.

Personally, I just think snowboards are less able to finesse tight spots. Skis are simply more agile alpine instruments.
post #14 of 48
Gosh, where were you guys when I needed you on the 'other' thread !
post #15 of 48
I hope your wife is OK. My wife got nailed by a boarder a few years ago at Kmart. She only got a black eye from it.

I really don't understand the logic behind not wearing a helmet because it doesn't "always" save you.

Some jerk of a patroller at Sunday River today pulled the bar down without warning and nailed the back of my head. My wife was like, "Good thing he has a helmet on."

The patroller's response was, "What are you guys helmet salesman? I hope you feel safe until you go above 18 mph." Then he says that he doesn't like helmets but wears one when he boards. That makes alot of sense.

He was a real prick as my wife politely asked him which direction he was unloading from the chair and he was like, "I think I have the skill to avoid people."

It's jerks like that who give Mass people a bad name.
post #16 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
I hope your wife is OK. My wife got nailed by a boarder a few years ago at Kmart. She only got a black eye from it.

I really don't understand the logic behind not wearing a helmet because it doesn't "always" save you.

Some jerk of a patroller at Sunday River today pulled the bar down without warning and nailed the back of my head. My wife was like, "Good thing he has a helmet on."

The patroller's response was, "What are you guys helmet salesman? I hope you feel safe until you go above 18 mph." Then he says that he doesn't like helmets but wears one when he boards. That makes alot of sense.

He was a real prick as my wife politely asked him which direction he was unloading from the chair and he was like, "I think I have the skill to avoid people."

It's jerks like that who give Mass people a bad name.
Man, what a jerk!
post #17 of 48
Thread Starter 
One of the reasons I don't ski Killington.
post #18 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
I hope your wife is OK. My wife got nailed by a boarder a few years ago at Kmart. She only got a black eye from it.

I really don't understand the logic behind not wearing a helmet because it doesn't "always" save you.

Some jerk of a patroller at Sunday River today pulled the bar down without warning and nailed the back of my head. My wife was like, "Good thing he has a helmet on."

The patroller's response was, "What are you guys helmet salesman? I hope you feel safe until you go above 18 mph." Then he says that he doesn't like helmets but wears one when he boards. That makes alot of sense.

He was a real prick as my wife politely asked him which direction he was unloading from the chair and he was like, "I think I have the skill to avoid people."

It's jerks like that who give Mass people a bad name.
I don't suppose you got his name and mentioned him in the patrol room or administrative offices? I would have. I'd use stronger words than "jerk", since he clearly doesn't care about the enjoyment of the resort's guests, and is likely only there for the "benefits", whatever they are. No wonder the industry has issues with increasing customer numbers!

I guess he doesn't board above 18mph, or his head isn't going that fast when he catches an edge and head meets the ground!
post #19 of 48
We had a talk from a Neurosurgeon at this week's patrol meeting. He acknowledged that for a helmet to work for head on collisions with trees at high speed it would have to be two feet thick. However, by far the most common injury at all speeds is the grade one or two concussion caused by smacking something indirectly. Helmets have been proven to reduce concussions at all speeds.

PS: Sorry about the jerk patroller.....sounds like they need a smile school out there.
post #20 of 48
Lars,
Best wishes for a speedy recovery for your wife. As far as snowboarders go, I think they have a blind side on the heel side. New school attitude may have something to do with less respect for others too, but this isn't restricted to snowboarders.

Folks just seem to be paying less attention to the rules of skier safety lately.

bong
post #21 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog
We had a talk from a Neurosurgeon at this week's patrol meeting. He acknowledged that for a helmet to work for head on collisions with trees at high speed it would have to be two feet thick. However, by far the most common injury at all speeds is the grade one or two concussion caused by smacking something indirectly. Helmets have been proven to reduce concussions at all speeds.
... and it deserves clarification again, you're talking here about head injuries, which, overall, are a small percentage of ski injuries.
post #22 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
.....It's jerks like that who give Mass people a bad name.
A couple things.
Do you know that this Patroller was from "Mass"? Sunday River is in Maine.

Ski Patroller:"To promote the safety of all skiers (and snowboarders now)", this is one of the guiding principles that the National Ski Patrol was founded on. If this patroller was talking like you say, he was not upholding one of the MAIN reasons the Ski Patrol is around. He should have been reported to his Patrol Director at the minimum.
post #23 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by teachskiljp
A couple things.
Do you know that this Patroller was from "Mass"? Sunday River is in Maine.
I know where he is from because it came up on the chair. He is from one city over from where I grew up and currently live.

I am well aware of where Sunday River is located.

BTW they started using EZ Pass on the Maine turnpike.

Now NH needs to get onboard.

This guy was a volunteer partoller.
post #24 of 48
Lars, sorry to hear about your wife's accident. I hope she heels quickly and without too much pain.

As for "why always snowboarders?", here's my theory. It has nothing to do with blind heel sides. It has to do with the fact that it's so easy to learn to stand up and go fast and straight on a board, and to just throw it sideways to kill speed. You get a lot of young, aggessive people who learn only that much and start bombing hills with little ability to move themselves across the fall line once they get a head of steam going. They bomb the hill and point the board in the general direction they want to go, and if someone gets in their path, they don't have the skill to avoid the collision.

Please understand this is a generalization of a fair portion of the snowboarders I see on my hill. Obviously, nothing applies to "all". As a matter of fact, on Friday I got out on one of my snowboards for the first time in 4 years. Some of the other snowbarders on the hill scared the bejeezus out of me for the very reason mentioned above.
post #25 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
...As for "why always snowboarders?", here's my theory. It has nothing to do with blind heel sides. It has to do with the fact that it's so easy to learn to stand up and go fast and straight on a board, and to just throw it sideways to kill speed. You get a lot of young, aggessive people who learn only that much and start bombing hills with little ability to move themselves across the fall line once they get a head of steam going. They bomb the hill and point the board in the general direction they want to go, and if someone gets in their path, they don't have the skill to avoid the collision...
IMHO, JohnH's theory is 100% on the mark.

One example doesn't prove a point, but the incident related below one speaks directly to John's theory.

Last weekend I had 3 preteen girls in a level 4 lesson. We are all standing way to the edge of our main upper level green slope waiting for traffic to clear. I'm uphill of all the students. I notice a boarder (early 20's) heading right for us, moving fast. I keep thinking he'll just make a turn and arc away from us.

Of course, he doesn't, and when he gets 20 or 30 or so feet away, he sits down on his butt, and still keeps coming in an absolutely straight line. I could probably have gotten out of his way, but there's no way my students could have, so, for some bizarre reason I reflexively plant the tips of both of my poles hard into the snow, uphill from me in exactly his direction, forming a steep ramp with them. He hits the ramp with his board, his board rides up the ramp stopping just below my hands (whoops ... I hadn't thought of that minor problem), and a split second later, he is stopped in this rather humorous position with his board up in the air, laying on his back, holding a calm conversation with me.

After I check that he is OK, I ask him if he knows how to turn, and he says "No". He does this with absolutely no malice, sarcasm or embarrassment. I then ask him (while he still is in this position), if he thinks that turning might be something useful to know, and he says something like, "Maybe, but wouldn't it slow me down?". Amazing ... absolutely f-ing amazing.

That's what these kids really seem to think skiing and riding is all about, so what can you do other than be vigilant.

Tom / PM

PS - I eventually let him regain his dignity and let his board slide back down my poles.
post #26 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
I really don't understand the logic behind not wearing a helmet because it doesn't "always" save you.
You should have used the quotes for the "logic" you speak of. Some people just aren't very good at risk management.

I wear a helmet, but then again I also wear a seatbelt.
post #27 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
I know where he is from because it came up on the chair. He is from one city over from where I grew up and currently live.

I am well aware of where Sunday River is located.

BTW they started using EZ Pass on the Maine turnpike.

Now NH needs to get onboard.

This guy was a volunteer partoller.
Scalce, I know that you are aware that "Some Day Bigger", I mean Sunday River, is in Maine, but there are some out there in cyberspace that may not know this.

Good news about the EZ Pass, thanks.

Volunteer or Professional Patroller, it doesn't matter, they still are there for public safety and should not put down a person's effort to protect themselves, particularly when the are doing so with something that is so widely accepted.
Quote:
Ski Patroller:"To promote the safety of all skiers (and snowboarders now)", this is one of the guiding principles that the National Ski Patrol was founded on.
post #28 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
I really don't understand the logic behind not wearing a helmet because it doesn't "always" save you.
I figure that would be like if cops stopped wearing ballistic armor because it won't protect them from large rifle rounds.
post #29 of 48
Yesterday, my mother in law got hit by a snowboarder at Okemo. This is happening all too often.
post #30 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Yesterday, my mother in law got hit by a snowboarder at Okemo. This is happening all too often.
Your mother-in-law must be getting fed up of it.
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