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Tipping the examiner

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I did a Level 2 Teaching Seminar earlier this week at Sunday River. The examiner was Peter Howard. He's good. I think of all the examiners I've skiied with, he's the best I've seen. Still, on the 2nd day, the rest of the guys were passing the hat for a tip for him, and I felt a little funny contributing. To me, it almost felyt like a bribe or something. Who knows. he could be at my exam next week. It just doesn't feel right to me. Besides, at his level, I know he's not doing it for the money.
post #2 of 17
They don't get paid much. I pitched in when a group I was in raised a gratuity for the examiner. I think if the whole group acts together it's not too much like a bribe. I remember one lady gave some money directly to the guy in addition to the group collection. I found that a bit much! It should be strictly voluntary and anonymous.
post #3 of 17
Peter is great. He's the Chair of the Cert Committe for PSIA-E, and has been in that role for a long time.

If you think it's okay for students to tip you, then you should be tipping your clinician (instructor). It would be different if it were the exam, but is was a learning event. Go to any clinic and you should tip. The price you paid is a hell of a bargain, so why not?
post #4 of 17
Is this an Eastern thing? Do any of the PSIA members in the west tip their clinicians or examiners? I've never heard of it happening, but it could just be me.
post #5 of 17
nolo,

This caught me by surprise during my first Alpine event in PSIA-E. Every Alpine event since people have tipped the clinician. At PSIA-E Adaptive events no one has ever even brought up the subject of tipping.

I think its a nice gesture. These guys put their hearts into helping the rest of us improve, its nice to give them something so they can have a nice dinner or a short snort on us.
post #6 of 17
I've been to 25-30 PSIA events since joining the organization in 1969. Only once did someone else in the group pass the hat for the examiner/clinician/D-teamer. I've always felt that whenever I helped someone else out, I learned something for myself too, and I've heard that thought repeated by at least a dozen group leaders over the years.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
I've been to 25-30 PSIA events since joining the organization in 1969. Only once did someone else in the group pass the hat for the examiner/clinician/D-teamer. I've always felt that whenever I helped someone else out, I learned something for myself too, and I've heard that thought repeated by at least a dozen group leaders over the years.
...and often more valuable than money shows, eh?

I think, given the limited funds available to me, that my tip might actually cheapen the experience...
post #8 of 17
Hmmm..... Maybe you are using the 2 words interchangably. But when an examiner is leading a clinic, s/he is NOT an examiner. S/he is a clinician. Only in an exam situation is an examiner an examiner.

Tipping a clinician? - Go ahead... If you feel it was worth something more than you paid, then please do as you feel fit. This topic was addressed recently in a thread "Tipping your peers" or something to that extent.

Tipping an Examiner? - Not on your life! It would be a gross violation of ethics for an examiner to accept a tip before/during/after an evaluation. And the donor should certainly be met with a very strong reprimand by any examiner for even offering such a tip.

Speaking as an examiner, I would ask that you not insult me by even offering such a tip. I do not see how it could be construed as anything but a bribe, by myself, my peers, and my division.
If such poor judgement was exhibited by a candidate, I would have no recourse but to bring it to the attention of my divisional Alpine Committee, to let them determine how best to deal with it.
post #9 of 17
Based on all the discussion on this board over the last few seasons regarding tipping, I'd have to assume that these guys/gals don't expect a tip, but certainly appreciate it when it happens. They're providing a service, so if you feel you received good service, I say tip and tip well.

As to tipping an examiner while performing evaluations, I have a hard time believing that anyone would be that stupid. I'm sure it's happened though.
post #10 of 17
I've always "tipped a few" with the group after skiing and never let the clinician pick up anything other than their glass.
post #11 of 17
I have been a member of PSIA E for at least 15 years and have never seen an Examiner tipped in an exam. However, it is standard procedure in all events where the "Examiner" is acting as a clinician.

Just a way to say thanks for a job well done.
post #12 of 17
I've tipped the clinician for the last 3 or 4 events I've been to. Usually someone mentions a tip and most people throw in a 5 or 10 to the hat. If I have had fun and have learned something I feel it was well worth it. Just recently had 2 great days at Stowe in a trees and steeps event and the cost of the event was less than if I had bought a 2 day lift. So to ski with great skiers and a top notch examiner ,in 12-18" of powder also, was well worth giving a small tip I feel.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
Do any of the PSIA members in the west tip their clinicians or examiners? I've never heard of it happening, but it could just be me.
I've never heard of it happening either, but if it's anything like cows, I'd love to see it.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick
I've never heard of it happening either, but if it's anything like cows, I'd love to see it.
If it's a bull, don't forget to RUN!
post #15 of 17
That's very funny. It must be a Level 3 required maneuver. I did it when demonstrating diverging parallel; chopped that big ol' examiner down like a tree.
post #16 of 17
That was good! And it made me think of a great way to make a really obvious hint to students....

At the next lineup, when an instructor is standing there with his/her class, before they leave to start the lesson, have the line-up supervisor walk up and push him/her over. When someone asks why they did that, just say "I was tipping my instructor".:
post #17 of 17
We have an instrutor who lives in Maine. So he gets a name tag that says " John Doe, Tip Me". Management did let that go on for very long.
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