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Hey Ladies

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi-I'm trying to help my wife buy some new skis-what's with alll these women specific models-any ladies out there have an opinion on this trend (or is it marketing madness).

My wife is a true intermediate-98% east coast skier-works hard at getting better (tackles bumps and steep ice with improving outcomes lately!)-any suggestions-I'm looking at some short cross skis-maby the atomic sx-10?

What sre the epicski women (if there are any!) skiing?

Thanks
Liam
post #2 of 19
I like my Atomic E7w 158's, though they are still fun I wouldn't buy new ones considering I now consider myself a true intermediate... I heard the atomic balanze B9's are amazing, and those are the next skis I plan on buying. I think depending on your wife's build, women specific skis may not be necessary though. I'm only 5'5", 128 lbs, so the women specific skis work nice for me because of the flex. I don't notice the forward mounting bindings make that much of a difference at least for me, its the flex I found more important.
post #3 of 19
See if she can demo the Volkl Superspeed gammas. I got them this year and I find they do what I want them to in a variety of (often horrible eastern) conditions. I am 5'2" and I got them in 147.
post #4 of 19
I ski on K2 T:Nine X's, which are 2 years old and love them.
I'm an intermediate getting comfortable on Black diamond runs and beginning to work on moguls and off-piste. I was told to get these
because they are more forgiving than others, with a softer flex.
K2 has renamed their women's skis this year. The equuivalent of the
Nine X is now the "One Luv," I believe. If you check out the chat/advice boards on http://www.k2women.com, you can read about each model and read what users say about them.
post #5 of 19
I believe in women's skis and think that they offer more than just marketing. I noticed a significant improvement when I changed from the unisex rentals to a women's specific rental.

http://www.skimag.com/skimag/gear/ar...335265,00.html

When researching my first purchase of skis, I compared the reviews at these sites linked below as well as the less comprehensive reviews in Ski and Skiing magazines; and ultimately narrowed down my preferences to something from K2, Dynastar or Rossignol based on a self-assessment of my abilities and terrain preferences, the reviews, and my experience on Dynastar's women's skis. If I had been able to, I'd have demoed, but that wasn't workable.

http://travel.canoe.ca/SkiCanadaProductTests/home.html

http://skipressworld.com/us/en/magaz...ll2004vol4no1/

(also read previous year's SkiPress)

http://www.techsupportforskiers.com/index.html

My daughter, on the other foot, has only tried one pair of women's skis (Blizzard something) and hated them. It may well have been just that particular model, but she's not convinced of that.
-----------------

PS. Hi Cryptica - I like 'em (X's), too.
post #6 of 19
Uh, I'm going to go against the grain here a bit, and suggest you have your wife fitted properly with boots, first. Bootfitter, footbeds, etc. Not quite as fun and exciting as getting new skis, but a well-fitted boot can make even bad skis work well. Once she's got the boots, go and rent some demo skis at a local hill or ski shop. The magazines have some good starting points for skis, but if I'd bought my skis on just a magazine review alone, I'd be hating life now. You just don't know what you're going to like until you get it out on the hill. And even at intermediate level, you can easily tell what works and what doesn't.

Women-specific skis tend to be a bit softer in flex, and readily available in shorter lengths. Definitely give them a try.
post #7 of 19
Liam --

I agree with Lori K. Make sure you get your wife good boots and footbeds first. And go to the best fitter you can find. That's what I did a few years ago and then I demo'd some skis before I bought any.

But even after I had the whole caboodle, I can't say I really understood my equipment and what it was helping me/preventing me from doing. But by splurging on some all-day private lessons in the past two weeks, my skiing has changed 100%. I'm not kidding. I took lessons with an amazing instructor who is a boot expert and she watched me ski for 20 minutes and marched me into her favorite boot fitter and had my boots tweaked and modified and my bad habits disappeared. Overnight. It was amazing.

Although I think my K2's are wonderful, I am now a total believer that properly fitting boots can change your life. So, my vote is with Lori K. Get your wife a great pair of boots and footbeds . . . and THEN spring for a great instructor to watch her ski in them!
post #8 of 19
P.S. Ella -- Glad to see another K2 T:Nine X fan here. They'll be antiques, soon, though. They don't make 'em anymore.
post #9 of 19
I purchased a new pair of Volkl Gamma Motion 320 156cm (paid $350 including bindings) for my wife last year. She is the beginner and loves them very much, she says it's very easy to turn on them.
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Cryptica,

Where (and with whom) did you take your private lessons?

Thanks all for the boot advice-though, we were already on it.
post #11 of 19
There is another thread on this. The title is something like "Lisamarie and other Bearettes." I ski on Dynastar Exclusive Legends, and the Volant Vertex. I demoed Burnin' Luvs and fell madly in love with them. However, while they are great for speed, they are a bit stiff. Not the best skis for learning bumps.
post #12 of 19
Liam, FWIW my wife is a level 6 skier and we also ski predominately in the northeast (NH/ME). She demo'ed women's specific ski's from Volkl, K2 and I want to say a Rossi (the K2 was definitely the T:Nine X; sorry I cannot remember the specic models of the Volkl, Rossi). She ended up with a non-women-specific ski in the Volkl 4* after demo'ing them two different occasions. We paid ~$300 w/bindings for the 4*'s over the 2004 summer.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Damato,

Yeah-I've heard from a few people that those "3rd step down" (my expression) cross skis in shorter lengths are the way to go for most women.

The Volkl 4 Star, Atomic SX 9, fischer RX 6, Dynastar Skicross 9 are all on my 'short' list for demos. Though, it seems on this thread, quite a few womn are fans of the women specific skis-aso I will put the exclusive legends, one of the k2 (though I despise a chinese made ski), and probably one of Volkl's gamma carver type skis as well.

Thank you all, you've been very helpful (I'm relatively new to epic ski and so far have found it a great forum on a number of levels!)
post #14 of 19

Liam

Not a woman but the Atomic Balanze skis like the B9 were very well reviewed. I helped with a demo day on Sunday. Several women skied the B9 in a 148 and really loved it.
post #15 of 19
I love my volant vertex epics. I've heard all the new volants were well reviewed by the female testers again this year.
post #16 of 19

I agree with the boot fit 100%

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryptica
Liam --

I agree with Lori K. Make sure you get your wife good boots and footbeds first. And go to the best fitter you can find. That's what I did a few years ago and then I demo'd some skis before I bought any.

But even after I had the whole caboodle, I can't say I really understood my equipment and what it was helping me/preventing me from doing. But by splurging on some all-day private lessons in the past two weeks, my skiing has changed 100%. I'm not kidding. I took lessons with an amazing instructor who is a boot expert and she watched me ski for 20 minutes and marched me into her favorite boot fitter and had my boots tweaked and modified and my bad habits disappeared. Overnight. It was amazing.

Although I think my K2's are wonderful, I am now a total believer that properly fitting boots can change your life. So, my vote is with Lori K. Get your wife a great pair of boots and footbeds . . . and THEN spring for a great instructor to watch her ski in them!

Once my wife was properly outfitted with boots and footbeds, it completely changed the way she skied. That and a lesson at W/B helped out too. My wife demo'd the K2 One Luv (167CM) and really liked them. Previously she was skiing on the old Rossi 10.4 CUT in a 178CM skis but the K2's according to her, " I just think turn and they turn." Take a look at what Ski review wrote up on them, it was almost my wife's quote. Best to demo first though.
post #17 of 19
Most "Women's skis" are simply softer (for supposedly less agressive skiing), and have the mounting point slightly (about 1 cm) forward to accomodate the different body weight distrubution that women have. If a women is a strong skier she can use any ski and just mount the bindings a little forward. My wife has been doing this for 15 years.

According to one market study I saw about 10 years ago, 70% of women buy skis by color. Women's skis are just a marketing gimick to make them feel special. All K2 had to do is call one of their tele skis the "She's Piste" and put flowers on it, and they can't keep them on the dealer's shelves. Put any women on a ski that is the right length and flex, and mount the binding a little forward, and she has a "women's ski."

A lot of companies make tele skis that match their alpine line by just leaving a layer of metal out, which makes them softer. If you want to buy a "ladies" version of an alpine ski, try the telemark version. I know a few women that are skiing fat tele's with alpine bindings in the powder and loving them.
post #18 of 19
Liam --
You asked where and with whom I took my lessons in the past few weeks. The instructor who saw what I needed with my boots is Joanne Younker at Whistler. She's a Level IV Canadian instructor, who also does coaching with the Canadian Free Style Team. And it wasn't only the boots, I really learned a lot from her.

And then I was also at the Sundance Film Festival last week and managed to get some lessons in at Park City Mountain Resort. Had amazing instruction from someone that Barking Bear's own Utah 49 recommended, Gene Gautieri. After watching me ski for awhile, he decided my poles were too short and took me in to buy new ones and again, I improved immediately once we went back on the slopes.

I may be going broke with all the private lessons, but it sure feels worth it.
P.S. Like you, I'm pretty new to Barking Bear and I'm so grateful to have discovered it.
post #19 of 19
[quote=Toadman]My wife demo'd the K2 One Luv (167CM) and really liked them. . . the K2's according to her, " I just think turn and they turn."

Toadman --
That's how I feel about my K2's, too! I'm told the T:Nine X's are now the One Luv's -- it's good to know your wife likes them so much. I'll be sure to check them out when it's time to buy new skis.
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