New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

To stretch or not to stretch?

Poll Results: Do you stretch?

 
  • 42% (24)
    I stretch before I hit the slopes
  • 15% (9)
    I stretch while on the slopes
  • 17% (10)
    I stretch after hitting the slopes
  • 24% (14)
    stretching, what's that?
57 Total Votes  
post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I was just curious to see how many of you stretch before, during, or after skiing and also if you don't stretch at all.
post #2 of 29
I have a yoga program/routine, which includes some very fine stretching moves and positions, I work whether I ski, chop wood, run, booze it up or read the paper.
post #3 of 29
I do some stretches before I work out, and occasionally before I hit the slopes. I don't do a stretching routine like yoga or anything though.

IMO, it's important to loosen up the muscles and ligaments a bit before working them and before doing something that could potentially injure them, *but* I've also seen evidence that extensive stretching and flexability makes the joints more susceptible to hypertextension and other over-stretch injuries in accidents while skiing or running or things of that nature.
post #4 of 29
I don't stretch but I most likely should.

In any case, I believe the common wisdom is to warm up a bit first before doing any stretching, since stretching cold (meaning before activity, not when it's cold outside) could increase the risk of injury.

With this in mind, I'd guess the best time to stretch would be after the first few runs of the day.

I'm definitely not an expert on the topic, though...
post #5 of 29
In my youth I didn't stretch.

Now I stretch before, during, and after skiing just so that I can keep skiing.
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
Yeah I stretch after a few runs or too. When I am working out I usually warm up by playing basketball and then stretch before I hit the weights. I was impressed to see how many are aware that it is always best to warm the muscles up before any stretching.

jonnythan- I too have heard that and that is why I don't go overboard with the stretching, just enough to get loose.
post #7 of 29
I do movement exercises and stretch before and after skiing, but it only allowed me to say one or the other, so I voted before. Later, RicB.
post #8 of 29
Don't see to many stretchers. I do before the first run. It gets me dialed.
post #9 of 29
DON'T STRETCH BEFORE SKIING!!!! Stretching a cold muscle increase the chance of injury to the muscle. It also relaxes the muscle DECREASING the preformance of the muscle. Studies have shown (sorry I don't have the refrences) that individuals that stretched before excercise showed a decrease in the height of their vertical leap compared to those that didn't stretch before.

What you should do before skiing is take a quick/easy warm up run or do excercises that warm your muscles like trunk twisters, arm twisters, leg swings etc.

L
post #10 of 29
Words of wisdom, Lonnie! Another study found that pre -sport stretching does nothing to prevent injuries. It may even make you more susceptible to them!
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
Words of wisdom, Lonnie! Another study found that pre -sport stretching does nothing to prevent injuries. It may even make you more susceptible to them!
Yes, I should have made that clear in my post. I only stretch after my movement exercises. If I run short on time, I only do a few movement exercise and skip the stretching. The movement exercises can build into a good funtional range of motion anyway. Why do you think this danger of cold stretching is so misunderstood or overlooked LM? Later, RicB.
post #12 of 29
post #13 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lshull
Good article there ishull
post #14 of 29
I find that the most critical stretching exercise for skiing is reaching for a cold beer at the end of the day.....
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by lshull
After reading this article (VERY interesting BTW), I'm not sure if stretching before skiing is good, bad, or doesn't really matter. It seems opinions are mixed. I find that, for me, stretching before skiing allows me to ski comfortably for a longer period of time. If I don't stretch, after an hour or so of skiing, I need to stop to stretch. So, my Q for the trainers on the forum, should I stretch before I ski so that I can ski for a longer period of time, should I ski for an hour then stretch, or doesn't it matter which way I do it? (It is more convenient to stretch in the lodge before skiing, rather than doing it on the mountain.)
post #16 of 29

whtmt

I always stretch before I ski and if I have the time I spin for 10-15 minutes at an easy pace to warm the leg muscles prior to stretching.

whtmt & Mackenzie 911
post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nhskier
After reading this article (VERY interesting BTW), I'm not sure if stretching before skiing is good, bad, or doesn't really matter. It seems opinions are mixed. I find that, for me, stretching before skiing allows me to ski comfortably for a longer period of time. If I don't stretch, after an hour or so of skiing, I need to stop to stretch. So, my Q for the trainers on the forum, should I stretch before I ski so that I can ski for a longer period of time, should I ski for an hour then stretch, or doesn't it matter which way I do it? (It is more convenient to stretch in the lodge before skiing, rather than doing it on the mountain.)
Well they disagreed on somethings but they definitely agreed that you MUST warm the muscles up before you do any stretching. Is there any way you can do a nice 10 min workout before you hit the slopes? It is very important that you stretch warm muscles and not cold ones.
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blizzboy283
Well they disagreed on somethings but they definitely agreed that you MUST warm the muscles up before you do any stretching. Is there any way you can do a nice 10 min workout before you hit the slopes? It is very important that you stretch warm muscles and not cold ones.
Generally, I won't be able to do much of a workout prior to hitting the slopes, so it seems maybe I should take a few warm-up runs...then stop to stretch.
post #19 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nhskier
Generally, I won't be able to do much of a workout prior to hitting the slopes, so it seems maybe I should take a few warm-up runs...then stop to stretch.
Either that or park pretty far away; whatever you do it is important to get the muscles warm before stretching. I usually just hit a run or two before I stretch pretty quickly.
post #20 of 29
I usually start a day of skiing with a few easy runs to warm up. When we return home (or wherever we are staying) I'll do some minor streching of the legs to help limit some of the soreness.
post #21 of 29
Start off with a nice easy groomer. (Elk Ridge, anyone? )
Come of the slopes and jump in the hot tub.
post #22 of 29
Hi,

There are some interesting subtexts to explore: Stretching, Flexibility and Range of Motion are related topics - each with their own unique relationship to sports (namely: skiing).

There are three main ways to stretch: static, ballistic, or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation. Each is suited to specific situations and all have their own controversies.

Stretching is the means - to what end? Post-exercise stretching will provide some analgesic effects. A supple muscle performs better and resists injury more effectively. To promote flexibility and increase range of motion, an individual needs to adhere to a regular exercise regimen. Stretching sporadically delivers no substantial or long-term benefits. (E.G. The individual who only stretches when they go ski.)

Here is a link to an article that addresses the points I have raised here. At the end of the article is a comprehensive bibliography - which is an excellent resource for those of you who wish to dive deeper into any particular area.

http://www.physsportsmed.com/issues/..._00/shrier.htm

thank you,
hulagirl
post #23 of 29
hulagirl:

Nice references. Now does that mean steady drinkers are more supple?

Mainiac
post #24 of 29
Mainiac...

In this case, I think you mean *loose*.

hulagirl
post #25 of 29
As I've said in many previous threads, hyperflexibility, which can lead to hypermobility, can be a serious issue for woman, who are often too flexible in the first place. When you increase muscle length significantly prior to athletic activity, you run the risk of weakening that muscle, thereby making it infinitely more susceptible to injury. Keep in mind that an over flexible muscle is a weak one.

Let's take ACL injuries. One of the many causes is a muscular imbalance between hamstrings and quads. Why then, do people think that static hamstring stretching prior to skiing is a good idea?

If you search this forum for myofascial self release, there is some interesting info on this. Foam roiller warm ups can untie a muscle knot without increasing muscle length.
At the first Academy, I conducted on snow dynamic flexiblity sessions prior to skiing which were pretty darn effective.
Keep in mind, whether you are talking about flexibility, balance or strength, the key word is dynamic.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mainiac
Now does that mean steady drinkers are more supple?
LM, care to comment on this from the point of ESA1?
post #27 of 29
On ski days, just slow flexibility stuff for my feet, achilles tendons, & spinal column. With that I'm ready to go off the first early chair...which is an enjoyable time of my day.:
post #28 of 29
Hulagirl- big fan of your post, thats just plain correct information. I wish i could focus on one thing and write it well... as you can see i tend to be a bit verbose...
my background
As part of my research for my degree in exercise science I've bene involved with a few studies looking at ACL injuries. the first dealt with fatigue related changes in kinetics leading to ACL. The second was a plyometric training protocal reducing ACL injuries in adolescent females. A third was static stretching affect on muscle length and power production. This last one is very pertainate, but I've learned alot from all 3 studies.
Stretching
Here we go. stretching in general seems to only have an affect when it is part of a long term (chronic) plan. There is little change in static resting length of a muscle during acute (just did it right now) stretching. There is also a little change in force production from the statically stretched muscle. (if you want me to go into detail on golgi tendon organs and the like, then post asking me...for now i'll keep it simple)

The changes in power output and resting length often revert back to a pre-stretch state within a short amount of time. seconds to a minute. So frankly, it doesn't seem to matter much.

Want Results?
Just warm up. increasing muscle temperature decreases its viscosity and makes it easier to move around joints, stretch, react etc. This can be done with a nice easy run followed by a few lunges, some twists,etc.(dynamic stretching) ...but its also only good for as long as your muscles stay warm.

To stretch or not to stretch?
Honestly, most here aren't high level athletes where performance actually matters. (this is big for the elite sprinter on the line at the olympics.) The biggest benefit that static stretching itself will provide is Mental... if it makes you feel better then you'll ski better and be safer. If this were gymnastics, or a very flexibility-related sport then yes, stretch stretch strech, before you begin your routine.
final opinion/summary
in my eyes, Stretching ought to be done to make you feel better and/ or at night (each and every if you're going to do it at all) By stretching every night you can get to/ maintain a good range of motion (ROM) that will allow you to ski well. To be safer from injury its the ROM that your body has everyday that is important, unfortunately you can't do much about that by stretching before you ski.

PS. Limiting Soreness.
Soreness will be a result of lactic acid build up or micro tears in the muscle. Stretching will not have a profound affect on either. Infact, vigorous stretching can increase pain (IMO). To limit pain (not eliminate it) I'd say to wind down your ski-day with a few easy runs, just like you began it. This reduces the amount of lactic acid (HLA)in your legs as you head to the lodge. When you get some shoes on then go for a little walk to circulate more blood to remove more of that HLA instead of letting it pool. I'm a big fan of "active recovery".
post #29 of 29
Before and after.

Can't vote for both in the poll.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: