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how often are you doing base repairs

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
After skiing on Jan 20 and having a nice 380 KM 7 hour dirve home (very bad weather) bud and I discussed base repairs and how often we are having it done.

we are both excellent skiers and prefer to spend our time "off Piste" in bounds. we aren't stupid we stay out of areas we know are gonna hack our skis but at the same time we will take a chance to get some good snow.

Granted at the begining of the season rock dings and hacks are a no brainer and part of the price your pay, but.. Our home mountain (marmot Basin) is reporting a base of 231 cm, the day we skied last (Jan 20) there was at least 30 cm fresh with a real good solid well skied on base.

It seems the last few years I basically have to do base repairs after every trip, sometime I choose not to because well.... they are gonna get dinged next time and it is only a small ding in them now.

this turned our conversation to ski purchase choices. He rides on $1200.00 (includes bindings) Soly Pilot 10's. I ride on $350 (no bindings) Rossignol Axium supers. He freaks out after every ding, I am not happy about it, with a ding, but after enough abuse oh well burm em who cares they were $350.

he is going to hang onto those $1200 for a longer time than me, he babies them and his overall ski experiance I beleive is lessened by all the worry. I ski em like I stole em and really don't think about my bases to much. He granted has better skis and can perform at a slightly higher level (really only can go faster) I just don't know if high dollar skis are worth it for all the worry that comes with them.

so.... does everyone else have to do base repairs after every trip or ski day?

does anyone else buy cheaper skis because of the ding factor?

Mark
post #2 of 21
You know, I really think that some skis are tougher than others. Sals are not likely to be on the top of that list either. My Mojos for example have what I think is essentially a 'rental fleet' base; e.g. well nigh indestructible. I have only had to ptex them once in the last two seasons and I have inadvertantly skied over plenty of little rock outcroppings.

On the more philophical side of the thread, yea, I agree the _last_ thing you want to do is buy super $$ skis only so you can spend all of your time on the mountain worrying about them. Unless you are a masters racer or something, ski 'em like you stole 'em. Reminds me of people who buy exotic cars but never enjoy them because they are afraid of ruining the paint jobs. I'm not saying, be reckless, sure you should pay attention to where you are skiing and take care of your equipment. But if I see an untracked powder field am I going to not ski it because I know there might be a few submerged rocks? Probably not.

Moral: never pay more than $400 for a pair of skis.
post #3 of 21
1200 beans for Soloman Pilot 10's...man remind me not to go where he buy his gear!

I generally don't worry about small wounds unless they are a core shot, then I will fix em right away. I might touch up the bases once a year on average 1yr=about 60 days.

Unless it is a year like we're having this year...I've stopped going now(in Fernie) until conditions improve.
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferniefreeheels
1200 beans for Soloman Pilot 10's...man remind me not to go where he buy his gear!
judging by his location I'm guessing thats CDN not USD.

Base dings, Depends on how bad. small dings I usually scrape off any raised parts and just leave the rest. Unless it's a core shot, or real deep cut, I usually leave them until the end of the season and do it about once a year. I touchup my edges and wax every day on the snow.
post #5 of 21
I wax every 2-3 days and if my bases need work, I do it.

Usually every 3-4 waxes I have some work to do. I spend most of the day off piste, and rarely stay out because I think I may damage my skis.
post #6 of 21
Funny, but I have to go in for a base repair everytime I ski Marmot too!

I usually need about three touch ups a season, once after the early season opening conditions, once after my mid-season Marmot trip, and once as we get into spring skiing.

p.s. I really like Marmot and the conditions are usually good, but I always seem to find a couple of rocks at the bottom of Highway 16 or Paradise.
post #7 of 21
I am glad someone asked this, because I was going to ask if it is normal to have your ski bases scratched up all the time. I just bought a new pair of Solomon Scramblers this year (paid $645 USD with bindings) and the bases are getting quite scratched. I try to avoid skiing over rocks, but I know it's happened and I once skiied down a trail at Sugarloaf with thin cover that had a ton of little gravelly rocks on it. Last week I got a deeper scratch that had tiny pieces of plastic sticking off it. I have no idea how it happened, can ice cause scratches?

Anyway, how much of a big deal is it to have scratched up bases? At what point does it start to affect the ski's performance?
post #8 of 21
Scratches in your bases are not a big thing. You don't need perfect bases to ski. But you do not flat bases. I just had my Volkl AX3's stoneground for there first time. I have over 40 day's on them. The bases had a lot of small scratches and only one small core shot. I fill the core shots when I get them. This past sunday at Okemo I picked up three core shots (stay out of the trees until a lot more snow has fallen)which I filled when I got home. The scratches, I don't worry about, they don't affect how the ski feels. Don't worry about the small stuff. If you could have seen the bases before the stone grind. You would understand. They had lots of small dings and scratches. The reason I took them in was because when I finally pulled the flat bar down the base, it only touched about 1 inch wide down the center of the ski. After the grind they felt as good if not better then new. I've had these ski since about this time last year. Ski 65+ days a season. 33 day's so far this season.
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferniefreeheels
1200 beans for Soloman Pilot 10's...man remind me not to go where he buy his gear!
that is Canadian $ and he bought then hot off the line when they were first released. He wanted em bad' and just had to have them price be damned.

Mark
post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 
[quote=gnjantzie]Funny, but I have to go in for a base repair everytime I ski Marmot too!

QUOTE]

It must be a Marmot thing, I don't usually have to do base repair after Sunshine or Louise but every time I ski Marmot I have nasty hacks that really have to get fixed. partly because we put so much time and effort to go for one day, 4 hour drive each way, very little sleep, BBQ at the truck etc... so I want to ensure that when I get there I have nothing to whine or curse about.

Perhaps it's that I know Marmot so well and know where to go to get good lines adn we stay off the main runs, but sunshine and Louise I don't ski that often so the main runs are good to keep me satisfied and I don't really know all the good stashes therefore at Sunshine and Louise I likely spend more time on normal well used off piste than the hidden off piste.

there should be a marmot hack stamp program like at subway.

Mark
post #11 of 21
My public eneimies bases are pretty indestructable, but while skiing the trees at granite peak a piece of granit took out a nice piece of P-tex right along the egde. i went out and found some P-tex and its good now. Since my bases are so hard all the things you hit just leave a small scuff looking thing that a nice base shop couldnt stone grind.
So when you think they need work if its cheap get it done.
post #12 of 21
I repair major base damage and core shots before skiing again (unless I am unable to do so). I repair moderate damage usually right away but I don’t sweat it. And I repair minor damage at my leisure. I like doing the work so I tend to do it often.

I wax daily unless I can’t (like while on a trip away from home).

I sharpen edges as soon as they are dull or when the snow is firm to hard and then I do a quick touch-up every other day. I knock down rock burrs every day or more often.

I check and adjust bindings 2x per year.

I repair top side damage, nicks, etc before skiing again. I use polyester resin to reseal any break exposing structural materials.

I base grind the skis once a year (or less), usually after the snow base is sufficient to limit the chance of major base damage or core shots.

I summerize the skis by repairing the bases, sharpening edges, relaxing and lubricating the bindings, waxing the bases and edges but not scraping them, doing any necessary top side repairs, and rubbing down the skis with a cloth sprayed with furniture polish.

Mark
post #13 of 21
Tuning for me depends on the ski.

All Mtn / Powder: Core shots weigh heavily on my psyche and I'll fix them ASAP. I do my own tuning so if I core it on a trip they'll have to wait until I get home. Deep scratches will get attention next time I tune, which is as often as I feel up to it or for a trip. Shallow gouges can wait until I grind them at the end of the season ... if necessary. I don't fret about what I might hit on these as I'm on them to have fun, and if that calls for going into sketchy coverage areas then so be it. What are you? A curator? Ski the bases off of 'em.

Race skis: Never go anywhere where there could be base damage - strictly gates and groomed slopes. Wax every day. Base repair immediately before skiing again, but not too much grinding. Sharpen regularly. Core shots ruin my day ...

BTW - I find Volkl's have some of the toughest and fastest bases out there. Not an easy combination.
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yukon
So when you think they need work if its cheap get it done.
It costs me usually $28 - $40 (minor tune and wax) every time I take them in depending on the severity of the hack. Mostly I take them in because of the base damage and not that it needs wax, wax smax I don't notice the differance on powder anyway. I love living in Western Canada, Hard pack huh? whats that, lol

is it cheap sure, i guess but spending $28 - $40 after each ski day gets old real fast. Do I care? No not really because my skis are $350 middle of the road boards and at the end of their life the total cost of them to me is acceptable. Had I purchased $1200 Soly 10's the end cost of those skis at toss em time would be far greater.

The greater question is really what do you want to spend on skis or what is the minimum level of performance you will accept from your ski's? the fixing is the same regardless of what ski your choose (some better some worse for base strength)

But I was curious if it's just my home mountain that is harder on skis or if other mostly off piste skiers are doing or having to do base repair after each day or trip?

Mark
post #15 of 21
fill em when they need em using the p-tex candle. Doing pretty well this year, but my tree sticks probably need some love. Too bad I don't care about those skis. I ski where I want to, if my skis get damaged, oh well, they're skis.
post #16 of 21
Quote:
But I was curious if it's just my home mountain that is harder on skis or if other mostly off piste skiers are doing or having to do base repair after each day or trip?
Nah, it's not you. I've seen my style a couple times up above.
Core shots - right away (likely 2 per season on each of 3 pair)
Deep scratches - couple of times a month I take the time to fill them in, generally get a couple everytime I'm at the Lake, SSV or KH.
Stone grind when they start to get really bad (30-40 days, so once or twice a year)
Scrape 'em somewhat flat and wax pretty much everytime I'm ski.
With our snowfall, you've gotta inflict some damage to get the goods. Most of the work isn't hard to do yourself, I'm sure I saw a tuning guide posted here and the gear you need pays for itself quick @ $40/tune.
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb
is it cheap sure, i guess but spending $28 - $40 after each ski day gets old real fast.
Mark
If you get a scratch then fill it with P-Tex, and then after mabey a month, take it in and get it ground. if you dont have many holes then waity until you think its worth it. Me personally i wont get my bases done until the end of the season, but thats cause im cheap, and i ride park skis.
post #18 of 21
Fill as needed...no more. Only do a base and stone grind 1X a year unless absolutely necessary. Do mininal hand tuning otherwise.

Unless you are a WC racer some of the scratches mean little and can be covered up with hot wax. Shallow scratches cannot be effectively filled anyway.
post #19 of 21
Funny you mention WC. My Shop Manger buddy used it tune Atomics on the WC. He said, don't worry about the small stuff. Even when the WC skis got nicks in the p-tex they wouldn't worry about them. Even the bigger ones as long as they didn't run across the base. The idea is to keep wax in the bases. Stonegrinding removes all the wax from fast skis.
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity
Funny you mention WC. My Shop Manger buddy used it tune Atomics on the WC. He said, don't worry about the small stuff. Even when the WC skis got nicks in the p-tex they wouldn't worry about them. Even the bigger ones as long as they didn't run across the base. The idea is to keep wax in the bases. Stonegrinding removes all the wax from fast skis.
You are correct.

Remove what you have to remove to keep bases flat/beveled but do not file, belt sand or stone grind often. All remove material. Usually, all a ski needs is a touch up on the edges. Burrs, nicks can often be easily removed with a stone or diamond stone. Or sometimes side filing will be required. In other words, don't do major surgery when minor surgery is all that is required. And keep them waxed.
post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thank you for all the replys, it is sounding like alot of the small stuff don't worry too much about them, but to address the deeper ones as soon as possible.

unfortunatly most of the time the gouges are fairly deep and another rock encounter in that spot would expose or damage the core.

The real answer I'm hearing is don't be so damn lazy and do them your self.

I think I will practice on my rock skis first.

Mark
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