or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Modern Technique

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
This is the first time in this section of the BB Forum and I hope this question is not something covered many times. If it is point me in the right direction.

I had skied many years before shaped skies, and have recently gotten back into the sport. I have seen the term (modern technique) in many threads and assume it refers to skiing on shaped skies. Can anyone recommend a good instruction book(s), or, better yet, DVD on modern skiing technique?

Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 17
Use the search button on the menu bar above and you will find many posts about what you are asking.
post #3 of 17
Check out the "carve turns made easy" series of books, videos, dvds by Al Hobart. It is billed as a racer guide, yet 99.99% of the program flows with all-mtn skiing
post #4 of 17
Pickup "The All-Mountain Skier" Second Edition, by R. Mark Elling. For me, much better than PSIA and PMTS instructional materials. It has great info on equipment, building basic skills, and handling advanced terrain. It's pretty much everything I learned in 30 years of skiing conveniently stuck in small book.
post #5 of 17

shaped ski videos

Just two that I have. Skiing With Shaped Skis, by Martin Heckelman Ski tips 5 and Skiing and the Art of Carving ,the film and book by Ellen Post Foster.Both available on Amazon .com
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Before I saw some of the recommendations here (I got anxious), I ordered the DVD versions of Breakthrough on the New Skis (#1 and 3) by Lito Tejada-Flores. Just wondering if I made a good decision, or, if some of the other recommendation would have been better. I know it's like "closing the barn door.............", but if I'm disappointed, I may try others.
post #7 of 17
I was looking at The All Mountain Skiing Book at the book store a couple of weeks ago. I agree it had a lot of good "stuff" in it. I think I'm going to go get it.
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Ebay has The All mountain Book on auction for about $15.00 (total, includes shipping). I haven't actually seen the book, but it seems to get good reviews from skiers on the forum.
post #9 of 17
I think I own pretty much any book on skiing technique pubblished during the last 6-7 years. I have no doubt that Harb's Anybody can be an expert skier, vol I e II is by far the best in terms of contents. But, it does not suit PSIA teaching and certification purposes (although some Ski Schools will not call the firing squad if they catch you teaching using PMTS concepts). And, I believe that Harb is working on a newer edition of his books (title is going to change, 3 volumes instead of 2, dvd's).
My second favorite is probably the Skiing and the Art of Carving (I suggest you buy also Technical Skills for Alpine Skiing by the same authors).

I also like "All-Mountain Skier : The Way to Expert Skiing" by M. Elling. But, it does not address the basic techniques except for a quick review in the first part.

Lito's book and videos are excellent although I do not like the editorial aspect of his book.

Ski the Whole Mountain: How to Ski Any Condition at Any Time
by Eric Deslauriers, Rob Deslauriers, Hank Devre is also a good one, to ski double blacks (maybe extreme ones and all sort of stuff. Maybe it is better if you take their clinics....

The Skier's Edge by Ron Lemaster is not bad. I must say that however I never really thought too much of this book as a teaching tool. Perhaps at very advanced levels. The physics is nice, biomechanics in my opinion is not really there, instead.

The New Guide to Skiing: A Step-by-Step Guide in Color, Revised Edition
by Martin Heckelman is not bad. Lots of ideas for drills, etc..

I have more books, of course, some from Europe, about Powder, Technique, etc.. but you cannot read them all or you will never ski!

I like books written the way Harald Harb does (I am PSIA, don't read more than there is here, but as a holder of a Ph.D. degree in science, I recognize when a book has a scientific approach and when it does not). Also, the more volumes, the better: it shows that skiing is not a little thing, it gives respectability to the discipline.
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
JohnSki,
I notice that you didn't say anything about Breakthrough on the New Skis by Lito Tejada-Flores. Is it because you are not familiar with it, or because you have a low opinion of it. I'm interested because, as I said in an earlier post, I have ordered the DVD version of it. I hope that I haven't wasted my money---retiree on a fixed income.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by werekong
JohnSki,
I notice that you didn't say anything about Breakthrough on the New Skis by Lito Tejada-Flores.
I bought these videos about the time I started skiing. I would not say you wasted your money, but I'd take much of it with a grain of salt. In the end, I had to unlearn some bad habits that I picked up partly as a result of using these videos. I won't get into the politics of these things (and there's plenty), but I'd say that without someone coaching you, it is all too easy to be a bit off in applying what the videos preach - and get in the habit of doing the wrong things.

FWIW, grab all the videos and books & scope out what you can - but the best bang for your buck (and it could well be a bunch of bucks) would be to hire a really excellent instructor for a few hours. You can't go too wrong with the EpicSki list or the Ski Mag top 100. You are a few hours too late for this year's academy

Personally, I'd really like to find a *true* modern technique video and set of books. Things have moved so fast that a book or film 2,3, or 4 years old is unlikely to be "modern" in terms of today's teaching technique. In addition, a video released 3-4 years ago will not incorporate/address the behavior of the newest generation of skis (side cuts, fat waists, etc).
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnSki
I think I own pretty much any book on skiing technique pubblished during the last 6-7 years. I have no doubt that Harb's Anybody can be an expert skier, vol I e II is by far the best in terms of contents. But, it does not suit PSIA teaching and certification purposes (although some Ski Schools will not call the firing squad if they catch you teaching using PMTS concepts). And, I believe that Harb is working on a newer edition of his books (title is going to change, 3 volumes instead of 2, dvd's).
My second favorite is probably the Skiing and the Art of Carving (I suggest you buy also Technical Skills for Alpine Skiing by the same authors).

I also like "All-Mountain Skier : The Way to Expert Skiing" by M. Elling. But, it does not address the basic techniques except for a quick review in the first part.

Lito's book and videos are excellent although I do not like the editorial aspect of his book.

.
I have been using all of the above books and I think they all have something to offer. I find it interesting that you don't like Lito's editorial style. I enjoy his intelligent, philosophical and easy going writing style (it reminds me slightly of Bill Bryson's style).

My fear is that he over simplifies many of the issues, but because he writes so well its easy to be seduced by his arguments.
post #13 of 17
The THINKING skier realizes:

1. There's no ONE way to go about any aspect of this sport.

2. The more positive you become that you've encountered the BEST way to do something on/with skis, the farther away you become from being a versatile expert.

3. Even with a library like JohnSki's, you cannot be certain your body is making appropriate interpretations of what your mind envisions. You need the eye of a good movement analyst. Why do you think World Cup racers have coaches?
post #14 of 17
Kneale

I had a conversation last night with an instructor who was in the Harb clinic with me. He was pretty surprised to hear that most of the things we talked about in the clinic were around 20 years ago only with different names. He was pretty surprised to hear that Jobert advocated a "direct parallel" progression for anyone athletic enough to do a hockey stop from a straight run in his two last books. (Teach Yourself to Ski and Skiing an Art a Technique).
I don't think a PSIA examiner would say anything about PMTS moves as long as you didn't identify them as that or use verbatim language.(a lot of them around here quote Harald and use his drills) It's just part of a bigger "bag of tricks".
Skiing is a sport that utilizes technology but doing it is an art, as is teaching it.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLATZ
Kneale

I had a conversation last night with an instructor who was in the Harb clinic with me. He was pretty surprised to hear that most of the things we talked about in the clinic were around 20 years ago only with different names. He was pretty surprised to hear that Jobert advocated a "direct parallel" progression for anyone athletic enough to do a hockey stop from a straight run in his two last books. (Teach Yourself to Ski and Skiing an Art a Technique).
I don't think a PSIA examiner would say anything about PMTS moves as long as you didn't identify them as that or use verbatim language.(a lot of them around here quote Harald and use his drills) It's just part of a bigger "bag of tricks".
Skiing is a sport that utilizes technology but doing it is an art, as is teaching it.
For several years I trained with a PSIA Demo team selector. He used the "phantom foot" thing at least once, and he referred to HH by name. He liked the drill, but he was very critical of the PMTS approach, which is based on movements rather than skills.

John
post #16 of 17
Also, check out Warren Witherell's "The Athletic Skier". And what Kneale said. On the money.
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
JohnSki, when you said:
"Lito's book and videos are excellent although I do not like the editorial aspect of his book." I didn't recognize that you were commenting on the videos I ordered.
It proves how unfamiliar I am concerning skiing instruction authors.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching