or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bumps - Page 2

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
The retail price is $175. PM me if you want info on pro pricing or becoming a rep.
That's too cheap. We're talking about Vail skiers. You'll never sell any unless you charge at least $350. They come with a stand and acrylic case so you can prominently display them in your rarely used $4M slopeside chalet. They also come with a rack to mount them on the back of your Hummer (also fits on a Mibok).
post #32 of 42
John,

You're right. The Donald came back with the $350 price, but insisted on an introductory 2 for 1 deal. Sorry, but the stand, case and rack are extras.

Needless Markup just ordered 10 gold plated pair for the next xmas catalog at $25K each wholesale. Woohoo - I may quit my day job! Does anyone have any ideas for how to incorporate an anti-theft device?
post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
Does anyone have any ideas for how to incorporate an anti-theft device?
No, but integrating a GPS with altimeter into the grip should be a simple matter.
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
John,

You're right. The Donald came back with the $350 price, but insisted on an introductory 2 for 1 deal. Sorry, but the stand, case and rack are extras.

Needless Markup just ordered 10 gold plated pair for the next xmas catalog at $25K each wholesale. Woohoo - I may quit my day job! Does anyone have any ideas for how to incorporate an anti-theft device?
$350 for a pair of ski poles? That must be the low-end version. Try the $1000 NASA technology, limited-edition poles that can turn any skier into an expert skier overnight. Think of all the envy you will get from your friends and chicks that you will score the instant you start using the new pole. It is cheaper than a Bogner suit, so why wait? Order now and delivery is limited. There will be a wait list just like ordering a Ferrari. For a limited time, there will be a $2000 Paris Hilton edition that comes with an educational video on how to operate the poles properly.
post #35 of 42
Talk about your thread drifts. I assume these poles will be digital, have power straps and heated grips.
post #36 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Talk about your thread drifts. I assume these poles will be digital, have power straps and heated grips.
.....with a releaseable anchor for self arrest on steeps. Hopefully they've ironed out all of the dreaded pre-release issues.

Yeah, I think this thread's about run it's course.
post #37 of 42
And then, there are those skiers who rely too much on their poles, especially while skiing bumps. Miss a pole plant and have to bail out of the line. Stick a pole plant too hard and immediatly get jerked into the back seat. Proper pole use in moguls is critical as well as is while skiing really steep terrain, but proper body position and balance combined with foot work is the key. You don't have to ski bumps like a bump competition all the time. There are many different ways to successfully ski a bump run. The zipperline isn't the only way. Unless you ski the zipperline exclusively, poles aren't the most important part of the process.
post #38 of 42
Like Lars just said, you shouldn't be jamming your pole into the snow. Pole planting should merely guide you down the run, and it should aid in creating rhythm. It also should be used to make you reach ahead and keep your momentum flowing, as you should generally be looking 3-4 moguls ahead.

The hardest aspect about it for me is to keep my elbows in tight to my torso. That is pretty crucial as you don't want your arms flaring out to the sides.

As for my style, I prefer skiing the bumps where you're able to hit the outer 1/3 of the mogul and absorb it all with your lower body, and basically continue down on a relatively straight line. It's those VW moguls that I hate. Mostly cause it's just carved out and you have to go where everyone else has gone. And skiing those isn't really an art either since you just kinda slopped into the valley.
post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Good luck. Most mogul skiers tend to use a shorter pole.
Actually, they use longer poles Phil. It helps them stabilize better after the absorption part of the turn.
post #40 of 42
Phil, most of the bumpers that I know do ski longer poles. I use the ones I have.

Going back to this article being Part I - How can you overlook the pole plat in the bumps in 2005. It is a big part of skiing the bumps but the whole freakin article?

What do I know?
post #41 of 42
heh, I guess I will have to agree to disagree here. The bumpers I know are going shorter. It gives the ability to stay farther forward and less chance of getting in the back seat.
post #42 of 42
Phil - that was a trend back a bit. I prefer right sized poles for all of my skiing. For me long poles get in the way.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching