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"Hot Dog" "Freestyle" The old school...

post #1 of 750
Thread Starter 
Man, Google is letting me down. I'm just not turning up that goldmine of historical stuff about the '70s Hot Dog revolution I was sure I'd find somewhere.

Anyone seen anything?
post #2 of 750
lol, uhm for finding info on anything check out http://www.wikipedia.org/
It is a pretty cool site. You can even contribute your own articles.
Good luck with the hot dog thing
post #3 of 750
post #4 of 750
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilskeer
lol, uhm for finding info on anything check out http://www.wikipedia.org/
It is a pretty cool site. You can even contribute your own articles.
Good luck with the hot dog thing

Wiki is real cool. I know one of the designers. The possiblities are endless.
post #5 of 750
Might be worth trying something under K2. As I recall they were big into it at that time with Wayne wong and others in the K2 Hot Dog team
post #6 of 750
jstraw---what are you looking for, something specific ?
post #7 of 750
Thread Starter 
Names, titles, standings, pictures, governing bodies, competitions...

One thing I'd like to find is the name of that Grizzly Adams-looking guy that kicked but in moguls back in the late '70s when I was in high school.

Surely there's some fanatic old school hot dog site around somewhere. I mean, isn't *everything* someone's hobby horse?
post #8 of 750
The K2 demo team were all competitive members---Ed Lincoln is the only that comes to mind.

Check out the credits for any James Bond Movie that had any ski scenes in it. Rick Sylvestor did a lot of the skiing and there were others from the Professional Freestyle circut on there too.

Orig guys from way back, before anyone knew what to call this type of skiing. Art Furrer and Stein of course went inverted though I wouldn't call him a Freestyler.

Mid 70s---Of course, Wayne Wong, Bruce Boleski, Mike Shea.

Racer cross over Suzi Chaffee (aka Suzi Chapstick), and Genya Fuller so you have a few chicks.

Late 70s----Scott Brooksbank, John Clendennon, (Eric ? Scott ?) Schmidt and Wild Bill Oleary (who wasn't so wild).

All I can think of right now. There was a professional freestyle circut and eventually several. I think the governing body was either the PFA (Professional Freestyle Assn) or the USPFA.
post #9 of 750
I think the Grizzly Adams looking guy that skied moguls was Jack Taylor from Maine. He would train in the summer by running on railroad track rails to develop better balance. Memory serves me he skied on The Ski and Scott boots , plate binding?

In the offseason he was a lobster fisherman. I hope I'm not submitting misinformation. But I think I have it right.
post #10 of 750
Thread Starter 
I did find this, thanks to this topic:

http://content.lib.utah.edu/cgi-bin/...&CISOMODE=grid
post #11 of 750
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
I did find this, thanks to this topic:
{See link in referenced post.}
When I made the post, I thought that you would appreciate that!
Test me, Test me...
post #12 of 750
If you want to find out more about "Hot Dog" "Freestyle"
than you ever wanted to know?
Contact: John Ostberg
"Air Bear"
1975 World Champion
Cervinia, Italy
Welch Village Ski and Snowboard Area
Director of SkiLink Learning Center
Ph: 651-258-4567
post #13 of 750

Dog Days

I remember those old hot doggin days, first as a kid reading about it in the magazines in the early 70's, than competing in it in the later part of the 70's. The circuit in the early part of the decade was called IFSA (international freestyle skiers association). Eddie Ferguson, Wayne Wong, Scott Brooksbank, Bob Theobald, Bob Salerno, Mike Shea and Eddie Lincoln were amongst some of the guys at the time. Genia Fuller, the Post sisters and Karen Huntoon were some of the women.

The mid 70's saw the emergence of a more lucrative tour called PFA (Professional Freestyle Associates) created by a guy called Curtis Oberhansly. This is where Midas became the big sponsor of the mens tour (remember the Midas Muffler scarves, and Colgate became the sponsor of the women's tour. The big events were given big air time on ABC's Wide World of Sports. Guys like Bob Salerno, Frank Bare, John Eaves, Bruce Bolesy, Alan Schoenberger and Mark Stigemeyer were doing lots of the winning then. That's also where Alan Schoenberger introduced The Puppet character on the stunt/ballet slopes. I saw one of these PFA events at Stowe, highlighted by Schoenberger's Puppet routine, John Eaves double front flip and Eddie Lincoln's HiHo (maybe the first twisting double flip).

Another tour started to emerge called the "Chevy Circuit". It was underwritten by Cheverolet and featured skiers the likes of Greg Athens, the Bowie brothers and Mike Brooks.

Both these circuits died out between 1996 and 1997.

The new circuit started the idea of a World Cup circuit. This came to life thanks to a huge push from Scott Brooksbank and his wife (at that time), Mary. That continued on through the later part of the 70's and into the early 80's. Skiers like Nano Portier, Jeff Chumas, Peter Judge, Frank Beddor, Stephanie Sloan and Renee Lee Smith were part of that era.

In the early 80's the sport started transitioning from a pro sport to an amatuer sport. This was done with the intention of making it to an Olympic status. Pretty soon, the Olympics allowed pros anyway and Freestyle skiing became a demonstration event in Calgary (I think).

Throughout most of it's existence, the sport had been 3 events; aerials, moguls and stunt/ballet. Aerials and moguls got admitted to the Olympics and stunt/ballet suffered a slow death from that point on.

Prior to the 3 event format, there were a number of cool, uniquely formatted events. One that comes to mind is the Aspen Friday contests. Although I never saw one first hand, I did have friends describe to me what it was like to compete in them. It was a on one run event, with a flat, smooth section on top, where the skiers did their tricks like tip rolls, pole flips, outriggers and ruels. They then moved into a steeper, moguled section which flattened out into a big jump at the bottom, where they did what ever they could in the air. One run, one winner. I think Eddie Lincoln might have one a rotted out old Jag at one of those events.

I wish someone would make a documentary on the hot dog and early freestyle years. There's tons of old movies that I'd like to see again, like Salomon's "Between Chaos and Beauty" and K2's "The Performers". If anyone knows where any of that old stuff might exist, I'd love to know.
post #14 of 750
Quote:
Originally Posted by tipvault
I wish someone would make a documentary on the hot dog and early freestyle years. There's tons of old movies that I'd like to see again, like Salomon's "Between Chaos and Beauty" and K2's "The Performers". If anyone knows where any of that old stuff might exist, I'd love to know.

Along the lines of "Dogtown and the Z-Boys", good idea. Warren, if you are out there, how about a documentary? I am sure you have alot of the footage stored somewhere.
post #15 of 750
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
Man, Google is letting me down. I'm just not turning up that goldmine of historical stuff about the '70s Hot Dog revolution I was sure I'd find somewhere.

Anyone seen anything?
I actually have a book named, yea..you guessed it, "Hot Dog Sking" it was written in the early 70's. I beleive I still have it, if you are looking to do research I could dig it up for you. Let me know.
post #16 of 750
The first ski movie i saw had Wayne Wong . I remebr wonderin at such a young age what it would be like to do what he does.
Well i'm still wondering, but at least i did learn to ski.haha
post #17 of 750
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tipvault
I remember those old hot doggin days, first as a kid reading about it in the magazines in the early 70's, than competing in it in the later part of the 70's. The circuit in the early part of the decade was called IFSA (international freestyle skiers association). Eddie Ferguson, Wayne Wong, Scott Brooksbank, Bob Theobald, Bob Salerno, Mike Shea and Eddie Lincoln were amongst some of the guys at the time. Genia Fuller, the Post sisters and Karen Huntoon were some of the women.

The mid 70's saw the emergence of a more lucrative tour called PFA (Professional Freestyle Associates) created by a guy called Curtis Oberhansly. This is where Midas became the big sponsor of the mens tour (remember the Midas Muffler scarves, and Colgate became the sponsor of the women's tour. The big events were given big air time on ABC's Wide World of Sports. Guys like Bob Salerno, Frank Bare, John Eaves, Bruce Bolesy, Alan Schoenberger and Mark Stigemeyer were doing lots of the winning then. That's also where Alan Schoenberger introduced The Puppet character on the stunt/ballet slopes. I saw one of these PFA events at Stowe, highlighted by Schoenberger's Puppet routine, John Eaves double front flip and Eddie Lincoln's HiHo (maybe the first twisting double flip).

Another tour started to emerge called the "Chevy Circuit". It was underwritten by Cheverolet and featured skiers the likes of Greg Athens, the Bowie brothers and Mike Brooks.

Both these circuits died out between 1996 and 1997.

The new circuit started the idea of a World Cup circuit. This came to life thanks to a huge push from Scott Brooksbank and his wife (at that time), Mary. That continued on through the later part of the 70's and into the early 80's. Skiers like Nano Portier, Jeff Chumas, Peter Judge, Frank Beddor, Stephanie Sloan and Renee Lee Smith were part of that era.

In the early 80's the sport started transitioning from a pro sport to an amatuer sport. This was done with the intention of making it to an Olympic status. Pretty soon, the Olympics allowed pros anyway and Freestyle skiing became a demonstration event in Calgary (I think).

Throughout most of it's existence, the sport had been 3 events; aerials, moguls and stunt/ballet. Aerials and moguls got admitted to the Olympics and stunt/ballet suffered a slow death from that point on.

Prior to the 3 event format, there were a number of cool, uniquely formatted events. One that comes to mind is the Aspen Friday contests. Although I never saw one first hand, I did have friends describe to me what it was like to compete in them. It was a on one run event, with a flat, smooth section on top, where the skiers did their tricks like tip rolls, pole flips, outriggers and ruels. They then moved into a steeper, moguled section which flattened out into a big jump at the bottom, where they did what ever they could in the air. One run, one winner. I think Eddie Lincoln might have one a rotted out old Jag at one of those events.

I wish someone would make a documentary on the hot dog and early freestyle years. There's tons of old movies that I'd like to see again, like Salomon's "Between Chaos and Beauty" and K2's "The Performers". If anyone knows where any of that old stuff might exist, I'd love to know.

Now that's what I call an inaugural post!
post #18 of 750
Oh, but for the good old days!... I managed to get in on the tail end of the early freestyle era, just before insurance killed the various tours. That earlier post by TIPVAULT brought back memories of names I haven't heard in years! But just to correct what I'm sure was a typo by TIPVAULT, those tours folded in 1976-77, not 96-97. And those Friday events at Aspen Highlands were called the Dearborn Cup. They were held just above Merry Go Round. What a trip they were! In those days, a really big crash in the bumps could earn you as much cash as a perfect run! They were truly the days of "FREEstyle". Now that a clock has been placed on the action, it has changed the face of the sport considerably, and limited what a competitor could do. I'm happy to see the FIS opening up those rules again- maybe one day the sport will really be "FREE" again?
Keep on rippin', guys!


The last I heard of Jack Taylor was he had moved to Steamboat, and had gone nordic... That was in the very early 80's...
Chris Thorne ran a pro bump tour in the Tahoe area for a couple of years,in the late 70's early 80's. Joey and Barb Cordeau, Dean Murphy, Mike Chew, etc were competing about then.
Scotty Brooksbank is still around- living in Reno , and is currently listed as an accredited PMTS instr. (GASP!) haha
John Clendenin was running some ski deck programs in the Bay Area for a while, then shifted to Aspen , where he runs "Ski Doc's" and "Camp with the Champs". He is also listed by Harald as an accredited PMTS instr.
Marion and Ellen Post(Foster) - Marion became a school teacher, and Ellen still lives here in the Vail Valley. She and Allan Schoenberger developed the Turning Point Ski Foundation, and together have authored several books on skiing, most recently, "The Art of Carving". I highly recommend all of her books!
Mike Grazier ran a freestyle camp program at Crested Butte for a while.
Bill O'Leary ran a freestyle training center in Lake Tahoe for several years as well.

I have completely lost track of Eddie Lincoln, Joaney Teorey, Dave Lincoln, Bob Salerno, and many others from that crowd.
post #19 of 750
"The Mobius Flip"! Anyone seen this one? I saw it on RSN or some other local channel while at Mt Snow Vt (I think) about 7 or 8 years ago. It's a half hour, totally psychadelic ski flick from the 60s. Looked like the director had found a good stash of the whacky weed when he made this one.

http://skimuseum.net/giftshop.htm
post #20 of 750
Anyone remember Jet Stix?
post #21 of 750
I had a pair of Jet Stix. Unfortunately, I was looking to leverage my leverage, so I slid them between the shell and liner of my boot. A few attempted jet turns later, the back of my book shell ripped. I might have explained it a bit differently to the guy at the shop that I took the boots back to.

Reading some of the quotes on people's postings made me remember a quote that I appropriated for my high school year book in 1976...."If man were not meant to fly, god would have given him roots"
- Airborne Eddie Ferguson

I've got so many stories coming back into my mind, jarred by this chain of notes. Maybe I'll sift through them and share the ones that might actually be interesting to someone else, and not too embrassing to the people in it.

One of the kindest people that I rubbed up against in my doggin days was Alan Schoenberger. In the mid 70's, he invited me to join him on an on-snow show that we toured around the east coast. I then invited this girl that I really like to join the show as well (I don't think she was too into me...yet). Eventually during the tour I wore her down to the point that she could see my one or two reasonable traits. We've now been married for 23 years and lead a great life in British Colombia. Spending that time with Alan was inspirational and rewarding. I've heard that he's doing well for himself and continues to be the showman that he was truly born to be.

That's so great.
post #22 of 750
Thread Starter 
The nostalgia got to me and I started thinking REALLY old school and I googled Ralph Jackson and couldn't find one stinking picture. Man our heritage is evaporating.
post #23 of 750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnarlito
Anyone remember Jet Stix?
Oh, yeah! I had a pair and I think I was still using them when I bought my Dynastar Freestyle skis (talk about noodles!!! Even at 120 lbs I could really decamber those babies!). Used those Jet Stix to do worm turns ala. Wayne Wong... Clendenin was one of my personal favorites.
post #24 of 750
tipvault, welcome to EpicSki! What a tremendous addition you are! Please don't be a stranger; it's clear you have a ton to add to our community!
post #25 of 750
Sunday River flew a number of these guys in to coincide with thier "Bust n' Burn" mogul event a few years back. To aid promotion of the event they dubbed it "The Legends if Freestyle", where roughly 16 of the old dogs including Wong, Stu Obrien (RIP), Brooksbank, and many of the bond movie stunt doubles competed alongside us amatures for prizes etc....well they got cash, quite a bit from what i remember. Well they did this for a few years until less and less ledgends could make it, but in the end, more people were there to see the legends try and rip it as opposed to many future USFST members competing in the amature events. It was pretty cool to see these guys still rip "Worm Turns" and other dated moves....and they were pretty competative. Everyone was like "who are these dudes??", with basically wong and brooksbank the only recognizable names..but they had serious Hot Dog credentials.


on a side note, Brooksbank agreed to come out and coach us freestylers for a season following a good experience the previous year for the legends event. He was a terrible caoch and basically an A-hole. The legends event had gone to his head!
post #26 of 750
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Oh, yeah! I had a pair and I think I was still using them when I bought my Dynastar Freestyle skis (talk about noodles!!! Even at 120 lbs I could really decamber those babies!). Used those Jet Stix to do worm turns ala. Wayne Wong... Clendenin was one of my personal favorites.
Cool! Slow Dog Noodles rule, man!
post #27 of 750
Everyone had a "Freestyle" model in their lineup. Spademans were the hot freestyle binding even into the (very early) 80's. Brooksbank an ass? My only meeting with him was at a ski show in Philly, he was rude there, 2 votes now.
post #28 of 750
This whole thread gives me an idea for one of those wild-and-crazy spring-fling ski-area theme days where all the locals show up dressed like pirates/hawaiian tourists/nudists/whatevers: A 70's Hot Dog Theme Day. Dust off the K2 Cheeseburgers, the floral patterned wind shirt, the stretch pants, the Jet Stix, the headband, the Spademan bindings, the Lange Comp boots with the yellow lining, the pre-mullet shag wig. Now, about that soundtrack....
post #29 of 750
Brooksbank was bitter because Wayne Wong had the shag hair cut and he was doing a Telly Savalas imatation. Two years ago we drove down to Aspen to ski for a day when in Vail and I saw John Clendenin walk by, and recognized him immediately , baret worn backwards.

My mom just moved down here to live nearby and when I helped her pack I found my Jet Sticks in the basement. Couldn't throw them out. Used them with my Raichle Red Hot fiberglass boots!
post #30 of 750
Tipvault , your recollection has me remembering a( PFA ? ) event at Silver Star in the mid 70's . The core of the group was there but a local wildman who's name I can't recall bested them in the bumps and was good enough in the airials to match them , any idea who he was or is , Tall balding blond guy that was still in the Vernon area as little as 5/6 yrs ago , lived in a bus I recall.
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