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Do you tip your peers? - Page 3

post #61 of 79
My wife feels she needs to tip out of obligation no matter how good the service might be.

I tip only when the person providing the service (usually food related) does something worthy of a tip. If they do the bare minimum just to do their job, then little if no tip. If they go above the norm with their service then I show my appreciation with a healthy tip.
post #62 of 79
Forgive me for interrupting, but wasn't the original question -- Do you tip your PEERS?

I was thinking that this was a question for people who ARE ski coaches/instructors - asking if when their family or kids take a lesson - should they tip fellow instructors who may be their friends and associates.

I was thinking that this was asking if it would be insulting to a friend to offer a tip.

I'm not sure if I've seen an actual answer to the question here -- oh wait, there was the lunch and beer thing
post #63 of 79
DrFrau,

I sort of answered the question back at the beginning of the thread. My kid (3 1/2 yrs old) has never been in a paid lesson, so that is n/a. However, when I take a lesson or attend a PSIA training event, I tip.

Here's one no one has thought about..... As instructors, we know how little we (and our peers) are paid. Have you ever tipped a clinician at your ski area. As instructors, this is our training which we should expect to be provided, but to the clinician, it's teaching a lesson. I've been a trainer for about 10 years and never been tipped. I doubt any of the others out there have either.

It seems kind of odd, doesn't it? You're getting the "lesson" for free, and don't tip. But if you paid for it (such as when a D-teamer comes to our ski area and people pay to ski with him/her) they generally tip.

I guess the issue with this, is that even though these are clinics/lessons, they are among friends and coworkers, and it would be really weird to have a friend tip you. I don't know that I would be able to accept a tip from a friend.
post #64 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrFRAU
Forgive me for interrupting, but wasn't the original question -- Do you tip your PEERS?

I was thinking that this was a question for people who ARE ski coaches/instructors - asking if when their family or kids take a lesson - should they tip fellow instructors who may be their friends and associates.

I was thinking that this was asking if it would be insulting to a friend to offer a tip.

I'm not sure if I've seen an actual answer to the question here -- oh wait, there was the lunch and beer thing
See posts 2, 3, 4, 13, 21, 22.
post #65 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrHyak
My wife feels she needs to tip out of obligation no matter how good the service might be.

I tip only when the person providing the service (usually food related) does something worthy of a tip. If they do the bare minimum just to do their job, then little if no tip. If they go above the norm with their service then I show my appreciation with a healthy tip.
No Mr. Nice Guy, huh? Not nice.
post #66 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
As instructors, this is our training which we should expect to be provided, but to the clinician, it's teaching a lesson. I've been a trainer for about 10 years and never been tipped. I doubt any of the others out there have either.
It seems kind of odd, doesn't it? You're getting the "lesson" for free, and don't tip. But if you paid for it (such as when a D-teamer comes to our ski area and people pay to ski with him/her) they generally tip.
Well, I see the fine line here. However, just to draw an analogy, if you work in a restaurant and if you get free food as a benefit for that job, do you tip your boss or co-workers

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
I guess the issue with this, is that even though these are clinics/lessons, they are among friends and coworkers, and it would be really weird to have a friend tip you. I don't know that I would be able to accept a tip from a friend.
I probably would side with you on any service job in general. However, given the circumstances, I think most instructors (including myself) would swallow the pride/embarrassment and gratefully accept the tip. I have been regularly sending my daughters to lessons (due to the drastic discounts) ever since I started teaching last year. I have not had one peer turning down the tip yet. Some had said no but when I insisted they took it with great gratitude at the end.
post #67 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrFRAU
Forgive me for interrupting, but wasn't the original question -- Do you tip your PEERS?
Thanks for pointing that out. I was wondering the line of answers myself too. Nonetheless, the divergence has also resulted in a pretty interesting exchange.
post #68 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb
Expects and sometimes demands a tip for what? doing their job that they are paid by the hour to do. Just showing up.
For what? Exactly!!! Nonetheless, it's a cultural thing. Even USPS/UPS delivery expects a tip there. And, on top of that, they don't even have to be nice to get one. OTOH, I never even get to see my local UPS/FedEx guys (who are here weekly, even through the toughest weather), nevermind tipping them. The point is the whole tipping business is not always about gratitude for excellence.

Here is another thought... How do you feel about tipping the waiter/waitress the manditory hefty 18-20% at fancy buffer dinners (regardless of location), where more often than not the server does not do much more than collecting the dirty plates. Unreal!!!
post #69 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr
Here is another thought... How do you feel about tipping the waiter/waitress the manditory hefty 18-20% at fancy buffer dinners (regardless of location), where more often than not the server does not do much more than collecting the dirty plates. Unreal!!!
Actually, tips are usually (or supposed to be) shared with the cooks and bus boys. So your 15-20% is shared amongst the 3-4 people that make your dining experience pleasant, theoretically.
post #70 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr
Well, I see the fine line here. However, just to draw an analogy, if you work in a restaurant and if you get free food as a benefit for that job, do you tip your boss or co-workers
If it was served to me at a table by a waiter/waitress, then yes, I defintely would tip!


Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr
I probably would side with you on any service job in general. However, given the circumstances, I think most instructors (including myself) would swallow the pride/embarrassment and gratefully accept the tip. I have been regularly sending my daughters to lessons (due to the drastic discounts) ever since I started teaching last year. I have not had one peer turning down the tip yet. Some had said no but when I insisted they took it with great gratitude at the end.
Tipping your daughters instructors is one thing, but as an instructor, do/would you tip the clinic leaders that train YOU?
post #71 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lnester
Actually, tips are usually (or supposed to be) shared with the cooks and bus boys. So your 15-20% is shared amongst the 3-4 people that make your dining experience pleasant, theoretically.
I understand that. But, the patrons are still dishing out the same tip as they were to have a full serviced sit down dinner.
post #72 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
If it was served to me at a table by a waiter/waitress, then yes, I defintely would tip!
I wouldn't because I see it as a benefit (especially from the boss).

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Tipping your daughters instructors is one thing, but as an instructor, do/would you tip the clinic leaders that train YOU?
No, I don't and probably would not if the training is all supposed to be a part of the job.
post #73 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr
No, I don't and probably would not if the training is all supposed to be a part of the job.
That's exactly the point. Getting training is supposed to be part of the job, but yet, the person doing the training is working for ~$10-$15/hr. Think about it this way. If you were a trainer, and that's all you did, you'd be one of the highest ranking instrucotrs at your area and never receive a tip.

Yet, if you paid for your own training (say went to a PSIA training event), and paid for your travel and clinic fees, you'd be more likely to tip (some do, some don't)

I'm just blowing smoke, pointing out the obvious.

Here's another scenario, if you had a coupon for a free meal at a fancy restaraunt, would you tip? nothing? same as if you paid full price? More than if you paid full price? (assuming the service was good). When I have been in this situation, I generally tip more than I would if I had paid, because I got the meal for nothing. I know other people who don't leave a tip at all, because 15% of $0 is $0.
post #74 of 79
I just pretty much gave a half day private lesson....Hey Finndog????? :razz:
post #75 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by jake777
I would never use a plumber let alone an overpriced union plumber. Any idiot can learn basic plumbing to cover anything that would come up in their house. Hell, my teenage kid plumbed the entire addition to the house, including the heating system. It came out perfect.
awesome news man. great to hear. It's attitudes like that that keep me in buisness. tell all your friends the same thing, heck even go help them do it.

Let me ask you did you or your son check the inlet and manifold gas pressures, did you check the heat pick up across the heat exchanger, did you check the flue exhaust temperature, how about the amperage of the blower motor, how about the plumbing vents on the addition did you leak test them?

Did you know that sewer gas contains H2s. that stuff will kill over night if he did a poor drainage connection. How about a CO test to ensure the appliance is burning properly. CO can cause brain damag with long term exposure and will kill within hours. Was he aware of the new national code to install only temperature regulating water dispensing devices to prevent scalding.

there is a good reason that certified plumbers are required, when someone you know dies because of faulty installed heating equipment, plumbing or your house freezes up just remember any idiot can do it.

better check your home owners insurance. I hope nothing goes wrong with his work as the insurance company is going to ask for invoices and permits for his work. when he comes up empty handed all that money you saved isn't going to help.

Insurance companies love to just deny coverage because of something not done properly, even it isn't in the addition he did. They just refuse to cover and let you battle them to prove otherwise.

but what do I know I am just another idiot plumber.

Mark
post #76 of 79

This thread has evolved into several different questions...

To begin with, for those of you that are new to EpicSki, there is a search feature which will allow you to access previous discussions held on just about any topic.

Many are the conversations regarding tipping.. Check them out- you may find some interesting thoughts...

Pay issues for instrs? Many threads on this one too!

Privateering/ Underground teaching? This one has been done more than a few times...

But the original question is interesting-.
Yes, I do tip my fellow pros for any services rendered to either myself or on behalf of my family or friends. It may not always be cash, but I certainly make sure that I take care of those that take care of me/mine!

An interesting turn of this discussion was whether pro's should tip their clinician while attending PSIA national or divisional events.

I have been an examiner/clinician since 1979, and the first time I ever got tipped was just about 2 years ago. I was completely suprised by it! Knowing what the financial situation of the average instr is, I certainly did NOT ever believe that this practice was very common. And generally, it is not. Previously, the only times I had ever tipped a clinician was at the PSIA National Academy. Knowing that the D-Teamers were making less per day then I was, it was the accepted thing to do!
When working with the pro's in my own school, I have never accepted a tip, outside of maybe a beer or two (or more) after skiing. I do not feel that "charging" my co-workers for my assistance is good karma!
post #77 of 79
ssh: In order to avoid labor law violations instructors are hired as "contractors", not hired as employees. Some instructors are usually hired full time just so the school has coverage at all times and they were "salary against draw" employees. I have seen a lot of dirty cost cutting measures and it's not getting better. Bringing in a bunch of marginal kids from Argintena (they were PSIA level 4's), housing them and giving them a meal pass; they used them while we stood around. Now, if you are just showing up for the "15 minute line up" and then go off and free ski for an hour and a half that's a perk, but they only cut you loose something like 15% of all line up's so the best you do is that hour of free ski before the first one.

I have NEVER even got a free lift ticket let alone a pass for my wife or son. The "contract" was so full of catch 22's, all "front end loaded" for the hill it's absurd ..... not even a discount ticket. I have never had a day free skiing even during the week when I came on my "day off" unless I bought a ticket.

Back to the original question, I have tipped coaches but those I am close to, I usually just buy dinner for us when we go out as a group after races. Coach + the coaches three kids a few times a year. This year I'll tip because we don't socialize with his new coach.
post #78 of 79
Thanks to this thread, my instructor today got his lunch bought and a $20 tip on a $115 lesson.
post #79 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Yet, if you paid for your own training (say went to a PSIA training event), and paid for your travel and clinic fees, you'd be more likely to tip (some do, some don't)

I'm just blowing smoke, pointing out the obvious.
I see your point! It is somewhat analogous to being promoted from non-exempt to exempt in an engineering industry where the lower level gets the overtime pay and "professionals" don't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Here's another scenario, if you had a coupon for a free meal at a fancy restaraunt, would you tip? nothing? same as if you paid full price?
It may be that I'm just more conciencious in these situations. I do normally tip according to if the meal was full price.
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