or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Why we teach our kids to ski
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Why we teach our kids to ski - Page 2

post #31 of 52
I might have to start trolling Paulas ski lovers for a date.
post #32 of 52
vanity piece with a few reflections on skiing and family togetherness:
http://www.dcski.com/articles/view_a...mode=headlines
post #33 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown
Does anyone have a tale of four generations at once? (Not trying to step on Bill's story; just curious.)
My dad skis too, but we have not been out with him as yet. My grandfather tried it at Alta in the 1950's before I was born (I still have the photos) but did not get on well with what appeared to be a little too much fresh.
post #34 of 52
When my wife and I started dating, she quickly realized if she wanted to see my in the winter, she would have to ski. With that, I took her to the professionals. I found her a woman instructor at Camelback and got her a book of lessons. Her parents got the bug and I did the same for them, but a week lesson package at Mt. Snow, (they paid for us to come along) now they moved to Vermont and have passes at Killington and Okemo.

When out son was born, he was on skis at 18 mo, not so much to ski but to get the feel for it. My wife asked, what if he doesn't like it? I said "He won't know he doesn't like it, its what we do in the winter, we ski. Its like a fish saying it doesn't like to swim". Kids really don't get the muscle control till 5 or 6. But for those first couple of years, the wife and I shared a ticket. She would ski in the morning and I would ski the afternoon when it got bumped up.

Now he is 15, and skiing (almost (99%) ) everything I ski. I am guessing he will surpass me either this year or next. It will be a proud time for me and a right of passage for him. As Warren Miller says, "Your kid skis as good as your for exactly one day..the next day he is better". I do know skiing is something that my son and I will have for the rest of our lives.
post #35 of 52
My husband and I love skiing so much we taught both kids at three. It was a ton of work but now we have our own ski buddies! We sat them down last summer and said "Christmas: presents and parties OR drive to Colorado?" We didn't have any new toys but a week in Steamboat they'll never forget. They are begging to make "no presents" a holiday tradition!
post #36 of 52
I agree with everyone's posts here. My daughter is 8 1/2 years old now. I started her skiing at 4 1/2. Being from Chicago we don't have a lot of really good hills close by. We have to drive between 2 and 4 hours to go skiing. I can't explain the bond her and I have while we are skiing. It's totally amazing that you can "grab" someone's attention for a full day. She is truly my "skiing buddy". When I get to go without her it doesn't seem normal.

I'm hoping this trend continues.
post #37 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Emmett
My own family's skiing legacy was amply demonstrated this weekend.

First, I got a call from my oldest daughter saying she'd have a week off from school and work in February. She knew exactly what she wanted to do: get together with Dad and any available sisters (four out of five) for some skiing. I agreed wholeheartedly.

Saturday I was able to ski with my youngest daughter Katie, age 8. The day was a brilliant blue and white. We giggled on the narrow rollers Katie loves ski in her special "trails" through the trees. We marveled at the "horsetail" cirrus clouds speeding over the ridgeline. After I sang my special version of "Blue Skies" in the liftline, Katie smiled, hit me with her ski pole, and informed me that I embarrass her "ten times a day." We ate corndogs for lunch and sang Beatles' songs on the way home.

On Monday, I got to ski with my 77 year old dad at Snowbird while we celebrated his second son's birthday. My birthday brother was there with part of his family. We all cruised Mineral Basin in the morning, forcing Dad to push his limits a bit since the corduroy had long been used up. His knees were done by lunchtime, but the legacy he gave to his six children and many grandchildren will live on for eternity.
Sounds like your dad did what I did for my family. My 4 "boys" are 38-42 and have 6 kids between them. We have 5 of them skiing and the last is an infant...maybe next year. The ones that live locally ski with me regularly and there are often 3 generations of us skiing together. Not many sports where you can do that.

My goal is to stay healthy long enough to ski with 4 generations.

This was my gift to all of them (did not realize how many when I started) and I hope that they all enjoy it and pass the love on to their children.

Someone said that skiing is a legal drug and once you are hooked.....
post #38 of 52
I am glad to hear all of the family tales.

My dad joined ski patrol when we were 10 and 11 so we could afford to ski as often as we wanted (free season passes for the family).

I married a ski patrol 22 years ago and our 6 and 8 year olds have been skiing since they were 18 months and 2.

My 75 year old father still skis with us, and we still get free season passes. The kids ski with us about 15 days a year and it is thier favorite thing to do. I am sure it will end some day, but it feels like a good parenting decision.
post #39 of 52

It works both Ways!

I envy those parents like Nolo and others who had that wonderful experience of teaching small children to ski. For me it was somewhat the reverse. My three younger kids all learned through school trips and for years tried to get me to start, but to no avail.

Many years later, my new partner, and now wife and best ski buddy. (I agree Nolo, once youv'e found them you need to hold on to them!) encouraged me to learn and so I started at age 58. Ten years later, I'm still going strong and plan on many more years yet. The kids ski with me regularly and I in fact my oldest son and I are spending 2-3 weeks in Colorado next month.

Have just had the pleasure of seeing several grand children (3 and 5) start last year and hope to see others taking it up in the next few years. I prefer them to have lessons from the pros rather than have Grandpa or the parents attempt to teach them but maybe that's just the bias of a professional lesson groupie!
post #40 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by IL_Skier
I agree with everyone's posts here. My daughter is 8 1/2 years old now. ... I can't explain the bond her and I have while we are skiing ... She is truly my "skiing buddy". When I get to go without her it doesn't seem normal.

I'm hoping this trend continues.
My daughter is now 9 - we're a little snow deprived in Boise, but we finally went up a couple of weeks ago. She woke up sick (but didn't show it), and we had to stop about 1/2 way up the windy road, and she was crying because her stomach hurt so much. I told her we'd go back down and rest/relax all day, but she said "no, I want to go skiing!" We ended up making one run and heading down, but it was worth it. Hardcore.
My dad passed away when I was 18, and my mom didn't ski, but she did get to see her granddaughter ski at the age of 3. I wish she could see her now. Ok, now I'm gonna cry.
post #41 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by gerathlete 1
I envy those parents like Nolo and others who had that wonderful experience of teaching small children to ski. For me it was somewhat the reverse. My three younger kids all learned through school trips and for years tried to get me to start, but to no avail.

Many years later, my new partner, and now wife and best ski buddy. (I agree Nolo, once youv'e found them you need to hold on to them!) encouraged me to learn and so I started at age 58. Ten years later, I'm still going strong and plan on many more years yet. The kids ski with me regularly and I in fact my oldest son and I are spending 2-3 weeks in Colorado next month.

Have just had the pleasure of seeing several grand children (3 and 5) start last year and hope to see others taking it up in the next few years. I prefer them to have lessons from the pros rather than have Grandpa or the parents attempt to teach them but maybe that's just the bias of a professional lesson groupie!
Better late than never. Shows how fantastic skiing is. Most of us learn a sport in our youth and give it up somewhere in our adulthood. Skiing can be learned early or late and enjoyed by all. Maybe someone who is middle aged will not become an extreme skier but some of the most enthusiastic skiers are those who learn late and are thrilled learning something later in life that can be shared with skiers of any age.

I met a man from Ohio many years ago in Crested Butte. He was 83 and had logged 6 weeks of skiing that season. He did not learn to ski until he was 61 and fell in love with the sport. He skied at an intermediate level but would ski most of the day and enjoyed a good dinner and beer after skiing. His wife had passed away but he could share skiing with his kids, grandkids and younger friends (all his comtemporaries were "too old" to ski).

That was 30 years ago and I am often think about the pure joy this man had about skiing. Skiing can be enjoyed by anyone at almost any age.
post #42 of 52
Another multigenerational footnote.

I am taking my grandson to a racing clinic tonight.

I started the racing programs 35 years ago to help a small area survive and to provide a better experience for my own 4 boys.

Won't run gates myself but great fun participating and knowing that something I started many years ago is still going strong and my own family is benefitting from it.
post #43 of 52

The best part of my life

Spent 2 weeks skiing with the kids (girl 18, boy 19) in SLC and Steamboat. Skied 13 out of 14 days, including a 7 hour backcountry tour. Lots of powder, steeps, trees, climbing, crud, bumps (Steamboat), etc. Groomers are a rare entity for us. It's the best part of my life.

The only down side is trying to ski so hard (my daughter and I are close but my son is constantly at mach speed and waiting at the lift) for so many days together. Getting going each morning is a very difficult task!

With them in college (both at Colorado) I'm not sure we will continue to ski together over most every holiday (as we have for pretty much the last 10 years) but whatever I get will be fine.
post #44 of 52
Did they want to go to college in Colorado or did you make them so you have an excuse to visit?
post #45 of 52

....

Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
......that we can enjoy each other's company if the context is right.
That's the ticket nolo Too often people possessing the knowledge/expertise in an activity loose sight of the enjoyment derived from life's bigger picture....simply being with others that you love.
post #46 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by drb
Did they want to go to college in Colorado or did you make them so you have an excuse to visit?
Actually, Colorado was a compromise. None of us prefer Colorado skiing and any chance they get they come to meet me in SLC or JH where we all much prefer the skiing. We only skied in Steamboat because of a generous invitation from a good friend.

For my son, Colorado was the best academic school that offered GREAT access to skiing, moutain biking, hiking, etc. He has taken tremendous advantage of that environment, skiing or biking 2-4 days a week (or more sometimes!). He has also found a good academic home with a geography (hydrology) major which he hopes will lead to graduate studies in snow science. For my daughter, she wanted the mountains as well but had more emphasis on academics and had some doubts about Colorado. However, she has gotten very involved in academics and student government (within a very short period) and is extrememly happy with her choice. I would say she is getting out skiing once or twice a week on average (during school).

Perhaps more than you were interested in but I thought others with kids might be interested in what's possible at CU besides the well known party culture that is emphasized in the press.
post #47 of 52
Its actually very interesting to me; thanks for the comments. My daughters will be college shopping soon, and I suspect non-academic factors will play a significant role. Its pretty sappy, and I'll date myself, but as the song goes: "Teach your children well....."
post #48 of 52
drb,

No issue here with CSN&Y. One other factor was Boulder. U. of Washington is a very good with good access to mountains and water. However, my son found the Boulder environemnt to be much more attractive (both the town and climate) and my daughter followed.
post #49 of 52
Why we teach our kids to ski?

Ski lessons for my kids were, by far, the best investment I've ever made. No doubt about it!

The worst - Playstation2!
post #50 of 52
My 7 year old daughter cried Tuesday night because she couldn't go night skiing with me. We don't let her stay up that late on school nights. Some elementry school kids teams were racing that evening. She would have gone crazy if she had seen them ski. I haven't told her I'm going back tomorrow. Maybe I'll get to take her after her basketball game Saturday morning if it isn't raining like the weather man says. She is becoming my little ski buddy.
post #51 of 52
My daughters are by far the best part of skiing for me , at 12 and 13 they are already skiing anything I ski . The neat thing is watching them learn and gain confidence . I know their hooked now because I can't even wax and tune skis without one or the other bugging me to let them do it.
post #52 of 52
My Mom started taking me skiing when I was about 8, and we skied together 3 times a week until we moved to an area with no skiing, when I was 16. Our last Hurrah was a trip to Colorado when I was in high school. I started calling her by her first name on the slopes, because if I shouted "Mom!", 14 women would wipe out, and my mom wouldn't even turn her head! We have always had a fantastic relationship, and I am convinced skiing was a big part of it.

I taught my husband to ski, and we took 2 wonderful trips to Montana before we had children.

We started our twin boys on skis at age 4, but it was slow going. We don't get out much, and they didn't really catch on until they were about 8. We always tried to make sure they had a good time on the slopes, and didn't get overly frustrated. Now they've reached the point where we mostly enjoy the same runs, and I can actually ski for myself, rather than watch them like a hawk all the way down. What a treat!

This week we took a couple of days off from school to ski - with my Mom. She used to have to wait up for the boys (who are 10) - now they wait for her, so they can ride the chair with her. At one point one of my sons gave me this adoring grin and said "Mom, this is an AWESOME vacation!!"

Like others have said - any activity that can include 3 generations having fun together can't be a bad thing! Hubby and I are delighted that our children enjoy skiing as much as we do, and we are starting to plan a mountain trip, now that the boys are proficient enough so that we can all actually enjoy the trip.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Why we teach our kids to ski