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Boot Dryers

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Boot Dryers, Are they worth the Money??


I have seen many different type of boot dryers on ebay and I would like to know if any of you have used them? Right now I am looking at a Peet brand one for my husband, but I see a lot of different types.

Can you name the brand, type, cost, and if they actually worked?

Becca
post #2 of 19
Definately worth the money. I wish I'd bought one that can do gloves at the same time instead of having to do boot/glove timeshares with the one I have.
post #3 of 19
Yes they help alot but you can often build something cheaper or use a substitute for alot less . I have a buddy that uses an aquarium pump and swears by it . I built my own boot dryer that does 4 pair at once with just a computer fan pushing room temp air , cost me less than 30 bucks.
post #4 of 19
If you travel to ski then this may be an option for you. I have a pair branded "hot dogs" but it looks exactly like the drystix available from reliable racing. If you're skiing out your front door, I would suggest making your own with forced room temp air.
post #5 of 19
Some creative use of PVC pipe and an AC powered version of computer fan works quite well.
post #6 of 19
I use a Therm-ic boot dryer. Best ski related X-mas gift. Quiet and compact making it perfect for hotel rooms.
post #7 of 19
I have a pair of turbo air+/air dry+. They're essentially the size of hockey pucks and go in the cuff of each boot with tubes running down to the toes and tubes out the top to put gloves on at the same time. They are super compact and just travel jammed down in the boot. They have a 2 speed fan and slight heating. I've probably dried boots 5 or 600 times with them and they keep going strong. That's pennies for every time I DIDN'T have to pull liners.

I also have the thermic driers mentioned above but they're in storage for the day the others blow up. The thermics aren't quite as compact as the turbos but close and I think the thermic are a bit quieter which is nice.

I've given the thermics as Xmas gifts before (not to betaracer) and they've proven very popular.
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bklyntrayc
If you travel to ski then this may be an option for you. I have a pair branded "hot dogs" but it looks exactly like the drystix available from reliable racing. If you're skiing out your front door, I would suggest making your own with forced room temp air.

Hi there....i have a version like drystix but called Happy Feet. Now i know mine can get too hot to touch and was wondering (now that i have new boots) if these types of boot dryers can damage Tecnica Diablo Ultrafit liners? Could they also reshape the liners since the Ultrafits can be heat moldable to a degree?

Ps. Packing these types of dryers can be a problem at the airport because they can appear somewhat dangerous to a inexperienced TSA inspector. They look like dynamite with fuses. It could be coincidence but i have a hunch this is why i`ve had problems getting my luggage on my flight.

Thanks
post #9 of 19
I have the Peet Shoe Dryer. I received it as a Christmas present this year so I haven't used it a lot, but here's my experience with it.

It is rather large for travelling, but can be done since the base is actually two pieces and the drying pipes can be pulled apart (leaving 4 pieces in total). Apparently you can buy a travel bag to pack it in, but I haven't found it available in Canada.

The unit is all plastic except for the heating elements. It appears to be durable enough for drying ski boots, since the unit sits on the ground and you have to mount the boots or the boot liners on top. The heating elements produce very gentle heat, which rises into the pipes naturally (no fan that I can hear or see) and into the boots. The heat is not that hot like a hairdryer but it does build up in the liner and eventually dries the boot. It has a 25 year warranty

My first use with the dryer I put both ski boots on the dryer and left them over night for about 8 hours. I didn't realize that it used heat to dry, so I left my custom insoles in the boots. In the morning I checked the boots and they were dry. I took the insoles out and noticed that the heat of the dryer and the weight of the ski boots put a little notch into each insole (from where the dryer touched the insole). It didn't ruin the insoles, but the notches are still there after 3 weeks.

After the insole experience I dry by taking the liners out of the boot and the insoles out of the liners, and just dry the liners. Since then I have nothing but dry liners and dry shoes. I have no complaints. But I do have a concern. Since it uses heat to dry and I have Lange FR Comp 120's with heat moldable liners I'm not so sure how good the dryer is on the liners. So far the liners still feel comfortable and molded to my feet, but I'm not sure whether they'll break down quicker over time.

I bought my sister the Thermic boot dryer for Christmas which doesn't use any heat to dry but uses room air. It is much more compact than the Peet Shoe Dryer. I'll let you know how she likes it after she uses it.
post #10 of 19

Snap dry

I have used the Snap dry boot dryer for years. They are made by the same company that makes Hotronic boot warmers. They pump slightly warm air into the boot and work great. They are very quiet compared to most to most similar dryers. I had the heating unit quit in one of mine and the company immediatly sent me a whole new system.

Snap Dry Link
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by L7
I have a pair of turbo air+/air dry+. They're essentially the size of hockey pucks and go in the cuff of each boot with tubes running down to the toes and tubes out the top to put gloves on at the same time. They are super compact and just travel jammed down in the boot. They have a 2 speed fan and slight heating. I've probably dried boots 5 or 600 times with them and they keep going strong. That's pennies for every time I DIDN'T have to pull liners.

I also have the thermic driers mentioned above but they're in storage for the day the others blow up. The thermics aren't quite as compact as the turbos but close and I think the thermic are a bit quieter which is nice.

I've given the thermics as Xmas gifts before (not to betaracer) and they've proven very popular.
I had the turbo air dryers you mentioned above. They melted my Superfeet Corks while on the low setting! I now use the Thermic it doesn't run nearly as hot.
post #12 of 19
I second the snap dry recommendation. Very nice. Just enough heat, just enough air, relatively quiet.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic
I had the turbo air dryers you mentioned above. They melted my Superfeet Corks while on the low setting! I now use the Thermic it doesn't run nearly as hot.
I can't imagine mine being hot enough to do that especially on low. I use Amfit (like surefoot) and they don't even soften the adhesive holding the cambrelle on. Sorry to hear about that. It would be annoying for sure.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Betaracer
I use a Therm-ic boot dryer. Best ski related X-mas gift. Quiet and compact making it perfect for hotel rooms.
I 2nd the Therm-ic. My wife and I both have one. Dries and wamrs boots and is very compact for travel. The auto shut off is a nice feature for if/when the blower get's too restricted...it shuts down rather than burning up. Worth the ~$50 IMO.
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
first off I like to thank you all for responding to my question. Many have answerd me above and beyond what I expected.

The Peet boot dryer sounds like it will be perfect for my husband's work boots but am glad to know that one should take the Liners out of their ski boots first before you put them on it.

I saw on ebay, a forced air unit which would rock if my heating vents were not in the celling. (cement slap house)

Now.. the idea of using computer fans to dry you boots is an cool idea for a group drying rack!!!

Thanks everyone, I hope I am not the only one who has learn something.

btw...
The portable ones I was asking about so he could use them when he is driving. Like take off his boots and but the dryer in them so they could dry out while he drived to his next customer.
post #16 of 19
I have a 175w power inverter in my truck. It plugs into my cigarette lighter (i don't smoke anyhow) or auxillary power port and converts the 12v automotive electricity to 120v house hold power. Since my Therm-ic dryer only uses 55w, I plug the dryer into the inverter and can dry my boots in my vehicle.
post #17 of 19
hot gear makes a boot bag that heats up your whole boot and does a great job of drying overnight. I've confered with many a boot fitter and they all tell me the temps generated by this bag will not damage liners or foot beds. Takes quite a bit more temp to affect the liners. an it's dead quiet. If you need a new boot bag, this might be another option.
post #18 of 19
I have a model that looks like the 1 pair here from Chinook

I got them to ship an extra set of the boot tubes, so it handles 2 pair of boots at a time. I was warned away from heated dryers with custom footbeds. This model uses room temp air and works great.
post #19 of 19
I use these and I have never had any liner or footbed issues.

http://dryguy.net/PRD_DG4.htm

My Salomon's always have a ton of moisture in them so an ambient air dryer would take forever. I usually run them for about 2-3 hours and if they still are not dry I will let the boots cool down and evaporate alittle and then I will run them again.
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