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Skiing with corrective eyewear?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I've just gotten glasses for the first time in my life. My prescription is fairly weak, -0.5, and I am nearsighted. I only need them for true distance and in fact I can read better without them than with them. I didn't think it was effecting my skiing at all, however, I now notice that I can see more details in snow with my glasses on. I now feel that my sight might be affecting my skiing. I do not want to wear glasses skiing, as I ski quite hard, tend to do a fair bit of hiking at the resort, and do a lot of bc touring; all of which I feel would make my glasses fog too much. My question is this; what do people in similair situations find the best. I can get prescription sunglasses and goggles to wear while skiing. Or I can get contacts. I see benefits and negatives to both. I can't wear contacts on a daily basis since I have trouble reading with them on, but I think they would be fine skiing, except for reading maps while touring. With the glasses/goggles I could remove them if I want to do any close in work, but they might be more of a pain in other situations. I'm sorry this is so long, but any suggestions from people with experience in this matter would be greatly appreciated. I'm really not sure which route to go.
post #2 of 20
I used to wear glasses then contacts, now Lasik. I hated wearing glasses due to the magnifying properties, contacts were OK but would dry out. Lasik is dah bomb though.
post #3 of 20
Get the Acuvue once a day or something. Just wear the contacts for one day and toss them away. So, you can wear them on days or just occasions that you need them and forget about the rest of the year.
post #4 of 20
I used to wear my glasses and wore goggles over them. Since my Lasik surgery, no need.
post #5 of 20
Welcome to mid-life prespyopia. Your eventual answer when vision stabilizes is Lasik. I used to need reading glasses to see anything when I work contacts. Now do everything without glasses except for fine detail close work. Soft contacts are the best option until you can get a permanent solution.
post #6 of 20
Although goggles are the best, Rx. Oakley Monster Dogs are very good in everything but snowy conditions. They have very good eye coverage. : I have two pair (persimmon and some dark polarized lens). In snowy conditions, I ski with Oakley A frame goggles. Glasses fit in them nicely. Of course, the glasses fog ocassionally, but only when I am stopped. They immediately clear with speed. The goggles never fog. I am not a rep. for Oakley. Simply stated, they make the best ski eye-wear.
post #7 of 20
I use a pair of goggals, just kitlle bigger than my rx glasses. I found wearing contacts, you might lose one inside the goggals.
post #8 of 20
I've used four solutions (NOT Lasik) - OTG goggles, Rx goggles, distance contacts (need reading glasses), bifocal AcuView contacts. That latter is the best. Any contacts are better than any OTG or Rx goggles. As you age, your prescription may change - both distance and reading. For some people, Lasik means they get great distance vision and need reading glasses for up close.
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by TOLOCOMan
...what do people in similair situations find the best. I can get prescription sunglasses and goggles to wear while skiing. Or I can get contacts. ....I'm sorry this is so long.... I'm really not sure which route to go.
get contact lenses. that way, if sunglasses or goggles get snow on them or fog, or it is dark, or you want to hang out at the lodge and check out babes, you can take them off, still see, and not look like a math teacher.

the only issue I had with contact lenses was the learning period of taking them in and out. it took a little while. be patient.

as for lasik, the failure rate (errr, incomplete success rate) of this in the 5 or so people in our office who have had it over the last couple years is about 80%. It worked perfectly for one person, 4 more got it and each had complications (tear duct nerve damage, undercorrection, overcorrection, one has permanent eye damage and can't read anything without a magnifying glass). scared the crap out of me.
post #10 of 20
I used to wear Acuvue soft (2-weeks types) contact lenses when skiing. One time one of them popped out of my eyes and I had to ski down with only one. : . Luckily I had some solution with me and able to put it back in.

Beside that, I never had issues with contact lenses. They can get dry with all the cold and wind but I always used drops while sitting on the lift.

I tried with goggle over glasses for about 1 run and hated it.

I had Lasik last week and now my eyes are 20/20, can't wait to hit the slopes.



....
post #11 of 20
Another vote for daily disposable contact lenses while skiing (or doing any other sport!). Disposable - if you lose one, who cares? I always carry spares in my ski jacket just in case. I never had a problem, my husband had one blow off in his goggles once, but he found it & popped it back in no problem. Personally, I think this happened because he forgot to blink!

For what it's worth, both my husband & I only wear contacts for sports, and go about our regular life in glasses (which we are both blind as bats without.)

Glasses always fog up, they're a pain to ski with. We tried, but much happier using the contacts.

Kristine
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
Welcome to mid-life prespyopia. Your eventual answer when vision stabilizes is Lasik. I used to need reading glasses to see anything when I work contacts. Now do everything without glasses except for fine detail close work. Soft contacts are the best option until you can get a permanent solution.
I second Lasik and until I turn 25 I am stuck with the contacts. They do beat glasses though so either get contacts or lasik and ditch the glasses.
post #13 of 20
If daily disposable contacts are not going to work for you, try "Clarity Fog Eliminator" made by Nanofilm. I've used if for a couple of days hiking for turns and it really is the best anti-fog treatment I've ever used.

Here's a link to the maker:
http://www.nanofilm.cc/lens_care/fog_index.htm

Here's where I bought a couple of packs (includes cleaning wipes also):
http://www.telescopes.com/products/N...ack_21803.html
post #14 of 20
I had laser in one eye and wear a contact in the other since the laser (not Lasik) was .... IMHO ... not a success. It's better now (over time).

The real downside of laser, and I'm not sure if it applies to Lasik, is that in any precip such as snow or sleet when I have to take my clear lens "sun" glasses off (I hate goggles for the peripheral issue), my laser corrected eye stings like the blazes at the slightest contact with snow or sleet.

Granted, this is an event (when the glasses ice) that only factors in a few times a year but side slipping down an entire hill with one eye (with the contact) open is a royal pain.

On the reading issue, I keep a pair of the cheepo reading glasses in my pocket, at $7.99 if they get broken who cares?
post #15 of 20
I've worn glasses for more than 50 years and skied longer. For years I suffered the fouled vision virtually all the lens anti-fog treatments cause. Then I got some Smiths turbo goggles with a fan that pulls air past my glasses lenses from all the vents. There's a two-speed switch for quick defogging if I've stopped too long and continuous operation for otherwise. Use two AAA batteries that last for weeks of daily operation. Trouble is they're a bit pricey. But far less than prescription goggles or contacts.
post #16 of 20
I'll make another vote for the contacts.

I have tried skiing with goggles over glasses. I never liked it. (Yes the goggles were some of the ones for this. I still carry the goggles and glasses with me just in case I have a need.) With contacts, I have never had a problem. The mountain air can be drying, but this never seems to affect me until after I am through. On warmer days when I go without goggles I go with prescription sunglasses.
post #17 of 20
I wear contacts for skiing, even though I never wear them for anything else.

Like you, I used to ski with no correction even after I first started to need glasses. When I started wearing contacts skiing, it made a pretty obvious difference. Seeing the small scale details of the snow is more important than you might realize.

I also have trouble reading with contacts in. Fortunately, you don't need to do a ton of reading while skiing. I might start tucking a pair of reading glasses in my pocket. Sort of a weird skiing accessory.
post #18 of 20
I have worn bifocal contacts now for over four years. They have worked great for me and gives me freedom at work to not mess with reading glasses. (Getting old). During skiing it is important to learn to hydrate properly and to relax and blink. It took a little work, but now is all second nature.
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the input everyone. I don't think I'm anywhere near thinking about surgery. I'm still trying to get used to the idea of even needing glasses. Besides, right now my vision isn't really all that bad. I'm only half-way to even needing to drive with glasses under Alberta Law. I'm only 29 and I think I should wait and see what happens for a while before I consider surgery. Sounds like contacts are probably my best bet. Then I can just wear them skiing and keep all the googles and sunglasses I already own. Once again, thanks for all the input.
post #20 of 20
I'm waiting for my year-end bonus and my tax return, then I'm getting lasik. I've had enoug of the glasses, and just can't get myself to stick things (contacts) in my eyes.


I have Bolle Vigilante glasses, and paid $15 for an Rx insert, which I took to Walmart and had lenses put in for $40. I also have 2 pair of Bolle Krait goggles, which I also bought an Rx insert for, and had Walmart put the lenses in. I can swap the goggle insert between the goggles with clear lenses and the ones with dark lenses.

The Bolle Parole and Vigilante sunglasses come with 4 sets of interchangable lenses, and the Rx insert snaps in behind the lenses. They work really well. Great for biking and other sports too.

I'm not quite as happy with the Krait goggles because the Rx insert fits inside a bit too tight, and the goggle lenses tend to start to disconnect from the frame. They have also had a tendency to fog up when I stop for a while, but as soon as I start moving they clear right up. I keep my regular glasses in my coat pocket for when I go in a lodge.
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