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New boots, now part of my foot has lost its feeling!

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Bought new boots on friday, Nordica Beast. The bootfitter who is supposed to be a good one told me that he was not going to do anything to the outer shell before I skiied for a weekend.

The bone sticking out on the outside mid foot cause pain. He put some support arround it between the inner shoue and the outer shoue and off I went. The shoue feels otherwise good with a snug fit but now after fridays 3 hour skiing and saturdays 6 hour skiing the top of my foot has lost its feeling. Now its sunday moring my foot feels not better and I have lessons all day.

Is this dangerous? I think its better to use my old boots today.
post #2 of 19
tdk6: I would use you're old boots today. You're feeling should have recovered quickly. Nerves can be permenantly damaged in ski boots. Putting stuff around a protrusion is usually the wrong way to go. Taking stuff away is a better method.

Any good bootfitter knows this and that makes me question if you're bootfitter even knows how to get you into the correct boots to start with.

If there is room in the boots grinding off the opposite side of the footbed often relieves pressure. That is not always a practical fix as other considerations are involved. Removing part of the lining or blowing out the boot in that area are other fixes. Blowing out the boot is a last resort.
post #3 of 19
I disagree that blowing out the boot is a last resort. You heat the boot and punch.... you don't like the effect you re heat the boot and voila, (Sorry no accent on keyboard Pierre) the punch is gone. Cutting and butchering a liner isn't so easy to reverse.

I'm not sure your bony protrusion and loss of feeling are related. If there is too much pressure over the instep you may be able to drop the boot board or make the footbed thinner. If it is from a very specific spot often it can be fixed by thinning to soften the hard plastic on the top of the tongue to remove pressure. It sounds like yours may be over a wider area though.

I'm not sure I understand why anyone would buy a boot called beast or for that matter doberman. Will someone come out with a boot called 'crippler' soon?

[ February 01, 2004, 09:42 AM: Message edited by: L7 ]
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanx for the input boyz, the feelin to the top of my feet has not come back and its alredy late night. I did ski with my old boots today and they felt soooooo comfortable it was scary. Conclusion, new boots better old boots more comfortable.

Is it possible that the top of my feet are damaged permanently? That a nerve has been damaged and that I will never regain the feel? The right foot was hurting more than the left one and is also number. Both feet seems to be injured. I can remember the same thing happening to my heel with my old boots as they were new.
post #5 of 19
I would doubt that you have a permanent injury, but a significant nerve injury from compression can certainly occur in a couple of hours. Nerve regeneration is slow, and may take weeks or months to . Get yourself to a good pain specialist ASAP (you can usually find one at a large medical center in the department of anesthesiology) if pain, burning, etc (rather than just numbness) develops. Good luck and get well soon! As long as you are able to ski in you old boots without causing further injury, you should be able to continue to ski, but alterations and bootfitting in the new ones may be difficult at this point- if you are unable to notice compression due to the numbness, you will not be able to guide the bootfitter in what modifications to make.
post #6 of 19
I would agree with L7 that the boney protrusion and the loss of feeling may not be related. The most likely cause of loss of feeling to the top of the foot is as L7 says, excessive pressure over the instep. Can be caused by to large of boot, not enough volume or poor support under the arch.

Ok L7 I will agree that blowing out the shell for true boney protrusions is not a last resort but I see way to many boot blow out jobs that do not correct a problem or if they do, cause other problems. Most people assume that pain is caused by too small and that is not always the case. Most people are in boots that are too large.
post #7 of 19
Hi tdk6,
...another $.01...I agree with Pierre and L7.
Are you using a footbed?...it sounds like while at rest, they're comfortable, and when skiing...they're movin' around. Take a good hard look at boot shapes(different brands/models)....you won't be the first person to ever buy the wrong size or wrong boot!
You know....due to how boots are shaped, particularly in the area of the high instep bone(forgot precise name?)...there is less room in a boot that is a size too large.
If you're not using a footbed, get one! It'll at least hopefully stabilize your feet and localize the area of the boot you might operate on [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

[ February 01, 2004, 04:18 PM: Message edited by: HaveSkisWillClimb ]
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by Pierre:


Ok L7 I will agree that blowing out the shell for true boney protrusions is not a last resort but I see way to many boot blow out jobs that do not correct a problem or if they do, cause other problems. Most people assume that pain is caused by too small and that is not always the case. Most people are in boots that are too large.
I see what you mean. I don't make punching the shell my first option either and some places I'm really somewhat reluctant to punch. You want to see people in big boots you should try working in a resort loaded with British tourists who bought boots from the experts in that noted alpine power that is the UK. I'm sure WTFH will jump to his nation's defense and I have seen good work come from there. BUT I've seen a lot of boots that could have goldfish happily swimming in there while the foot was in it.
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks again for all your input here.

I tried boots by Salomon, Head, Technica, Atomic and Nordica. And several different models of all brands as well. My problem is my size, 29.5-30. Very few shops carry good boots in size 29.5 and even less in 30. So I did shop around and try on at leat 50 boots over a timeperiod of a month.

I originally wanted a foam-boot because my previous ones were foam and good for 15y of semi pro skiing instruction. Foam boots are really hard to find and I finally gave in to this one boot fitter and bought these Nordica with heat form technologie.

My problem is the bone sticking out midfoot between were the toe starts and the heel on the outer side of the foot (mid foot). This bone has been the problem in most of the boots Ive fitted in the size 29.5. Same model 30 no problem. Especially when I lean forwards the pain increases, this because the pressure added to the forward footpad expands my foot sideways a bit. In the size 30 this problem did not exist but the boot felt a bit big and clumsy otherwise. The 29.5 size is deffinetly right for me I believe but not if the outer boot was not modified. I was right since I now have lost the feel on top of my foot with a epicenter of the bone outing on the side. Im positive that the numbness is caused by the bone outing pressure.
post #10 of 19
I also agree that there is probably no permanent damage. I crushed one of my fingers years ago in an accident (not ski related) and lost feeling in the tip for about 8 months before it came back. Unless your foot got run over by a steam roller while you were wearing these boots, you will get the feeling back shortly.
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by dp:
I would doubt that you have a permanent injury, but a significant nerve injury from compression can certainly occur in a couple of hours. Nerve regeneration is slow, and may take weeks or months to . Get yourself to a good pain specialist ASAP (you can usually find one at a large medical center in the department of anesthesiology) if pain, burning, etc (rather than just numbness) develops. Good luck and get well soon! As long as you are able to ski in you old boots without causing further injury, you should be able to continue to ski, but alterations and bootfitting in the new ones may be difficult at this point- if you are unable to notice compression due to the numbness, you will not be able to guide the bootfitter in what modifications to make.
I suggest strongly following dp's advice. He & I chatted a lot during the ESA this year (we were both in Weems's group). He is a friendly, thoughtful and amazingly intelligent guy with a great breadth and depth of medical knowledge -- and a hell of a skier too!
post #12 of 19
See a doctor and see if you can have your feet fixed (surgery) I have had friends who have had there boney feet fixed and it helped them to improve there skiing as well as basic walking. Then get new boots for your new feet.

For this season use the old boots. See a doctor soon incase you have to wait for surgery. Have it done after the season so you can heel over the summer and fall.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Whent to a different boot fitter yesterday that has a good reputation. This guy was very professional and he only shook his head when he looked at my injured feet. He said that offcource we modify the outer shell. No big deal. He drew my foot on a peace of cardboard and made some remarks. Sent me to another shop to get custom footbeds and now he is goning to modify my boots for me. He said that he would not let anybody make modifications to boots without first making cardboard tenplates and see how they fit in the outer shell. Lets see what happens.

BTW feet still numb :
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by L7:

I'm not sure I understand why anyone would buy a boot called beast or for that matter doberman. Will someone come out with a boot called 'crippler' soon?
Three weeks ago, I, a 43 year old woman, couldn't have agreed more. Yet today, I bought the Dobermans!

Why? Because I am a pathetic crackhead and I can't tolerate my painful, old, leaky, too big for me and wrong from the get-go boots one day longer!!!

After 3 weeks of shopping locally, online, and calling around the country, (practically a full time job), the dobe's (as I like to call them) seemed to be the best (actually, only) boots available to me in a timely manner. And I only sought them out because they came highly recommended by my "committee" of respected bootfitters.

Even sillier, I had to phone charge them from a shop in Michigan, without trying them on first. This very cool shop will let me ship them back if I change my mind, (which I am always on the verge of doing with any major purchase anyway) even before your sassy little comment! (Fabulous shop in Michigan, especially Mark, you are hereby officially exempted from the nasty comments below in this email.)

Maybe Pierre will have something further to report on this bizarre phenomenon after this weekend, since I will be rendezvousing with my new "doggies" (thanks UPS) at a hotel near Pierre's home area, for a night of bootfitting debauchery, (with the boots, not Pierre.) He'll probably hear my S/M style shrieks of pain all the way from his house... :

Hope this helps to answer your question. Sorry to take your very reasonable question and use it as a launching point for this rather emotional rant. I have had to go to such ridiculous efforts to even talk to someone on the phone who has a boot appropriate for my size and skier type that all my usual "standards" have gone out the window, along with half of my sanity.

I hope some boot manufacturing "big dogs" (pun intended) are listening, but I know if they are...they will just emit a loud and evil laugh (and or bark). They know that people like me, who will go to these absured lengths for their skiing fix, are putty in their hands...

If anyone with a heart in the boot business can hear me, I implore you to improve this wretched distribution system. And don't you dare tell me I need to do my shopping in the fall, when inventories are high. My frazzled mind can't think of any other product that makes such a demand on it's customers.

In my ideal world, the forces of cosmic justice would make sure this email gets to my superheroes of choice - the women of K2!!! You did it with women's skis, wonderfully, now, can you help us with the boots? (BTW, I own K2 skis and rollerblades and love them.)

Your friend,
DM
post #15 of 19
This has nothing to do with boots, but I too had a temporary nerve-related disability due to compression. I wore a 70lb backpack for three days while trekking 70 miles of mountaineous terrain in three nights. (It was part of a military training program.) I think I had the straps too tight, as after that I couldn't lift my left arm sideways for a few months. I was starting to get scared, but it eventually came back.

So, I'd say see a doctor, but I bet you'll be just fine.

[ February 04, 2004, 05:31 PM: Message edited by: paulwlee ]
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by Downwardly Mobile:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by L7:

I'm not sure I understand why anyone would buy a boot called beast or for that matter doberman. Will someone come out with a boot called 'crippler' soon?
even before your sassy little comment! (Fabulous shop in Michigan, especially Mark, you are hereby officially exempted from the nasty comments below in this email.)

</font>[/quote]Well I hope your boots are just sassy little dogs as well and not the viscious creatures that some real dobermans can be.

You do know what the comment 'my dogs are barking' refers to don't you?
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by L7:
Well I hope your boots are just sassy little dogs as well and not the viscious creatures that some real dobermans can be.

You do know what the comment 'my dogs are barking' refers to don't you?
Oh yeah - my "barking dogs" are the real reason behind my little rant!

Actually, all the puns, sayings and images connected with the words "Doberman" and "dog" have been fun "food for thought" for me. My favorite is:

Homer Simpson as ski boot buyer -"I'd like the (Doh!)bermans, please". :
Well, I thought that was funny at 3:00 am anyway.

Can you imagine how crazy it must get in the marketing departments of ski/boot companies! Maybe the person who is responsible for this particluar boot's name would like to comment. I think I'll see if I can copy this to Nordica! I already sent it to K2....hope you don't mind, L7.

Thanks for wishing me well, dude. Now, how am I going to break this news to my cat?

Stay sassy,
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by Downwardly Mobile:

Homer Simpson as ski boot buyer -"I'd like the (Doh!)bermans, please". :
Well, I thought that was funny at 3:00 am anyway.



Stay sassy,[/QB]
That didn't need to see the light of day or the internet for that matter. Best left as a 3:00am rambling.

Cats and dogs are generally best left to make their own peace. Problem is your new dogs are used to gravity lending a hand so I might suggest dropping one on the cat from something reasonable like say 12'.

[ February 05, 2004, 07:37 PM: Message edited by: L7 ]
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
My left foot is more or less ok now but my right one is still numb over a small area. I seem to recover, but slowly.

BTW, I also tried the Dobermans but I cannot see why anyone would buy a boot like that for anything else than pure racing! It was uncomfortable, narrow, stiff and expencive.
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