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A New Look at the PSIA vs. PMTS "Debate" ? - Page 5

post #121 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdowling
We use a drill called "The Crab," which is done in a wedge but it doesn't include a hop. You ski a wide wedge straight down the fall line, then alternately pressure one ski then the other to engage the edge. It shows the coach that you can engage edges cleanly,with no rotation.
I've been leary about jumping in on any thread that has PMTS in the title, but here goes...

So John, what do you call the movements that TURN your legs inwards towards each other? I'd call them "Rotary movements". They just static, and not active. So therefore, you ARE using some rotary movements to turn the skis. They're just passive movements...

The same thing could be said about the engagement of the edges in that drill. When you rotate the legs outward into a wedge, the edges automatically engage. You aren't REALLY actively enganging them.

These two reasons are why I really don't like "the Crab" as a drill where the setup is to "push" or pressure the outside ski. I think it encourages the wrong movement patterns. Now the same drill the the focus of flattening the inside ski, might be useful....

Lonnie
post #122 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by lshull
These two reasons are why I really don't like "the Crab" as a drill where the setup is to "push" or pressure the outside ski. I think it encourages the wrong movement patterns. Now the same drill the the focus of flattening the inside ski, might be useful....
Lonnie
Lonnie I used to feel the same way. I will do it in clinics for precisely the reason you describe.....to identify instructor who PUSH the ski tails while "crabbing" as opposed to accurately utilizing edging skills.

All joking aside. If the progression is done to the nth degree with hopping to match it is a great workout!
post #123 of 125
Rusty,

If used in that manner, it's very useful. As we all know, most skiers fail to flatten the inside ski at initation. The crab CAN dial in this movement for that inside ski ("keep the pressure as equal as you can and alternate flattening the inside ski on the left and then the right..." or something like that) I guess I just don't like the word "push" when talking about my skis....

L
post #124 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by lshull
I've been leary about jumping in on any thread that has PMTS in the title, but here goes...

So John, what do you call the movements that TURN your legs inwards towards each other? I'd call them "Rotary movements". They just static, and not active. So therefore, you ARE using some rotary movements to turn the skis. They're just passive movements...

The same thing could be said about the engagement of the edges in that drill. When you rotate the legs outward into a wedge, the edges automatically engage. You aren't REALLY actively enganging them.

These two reasons are why I really don't like "the Crab" as a drill where the setup is to "push" or pressure the outside ski. I think it encourages the wrong movement patterns. Now the same drill the the focus of flattening the inside ski, might be useful....

Lonnie

I use a drill I call "Jet Wedges" but there is no need to pressure the ski. Gliding wedge in the fall line, tip one ski on edge and go for a ride, then do the other one and your making linked carved turns. When that edged ski engages everything gets moving and the inside ski flattens out.
post #125 of 125
John (Jdowling), I think that the phantom move is in volume 1 of PMTS, Volume 2 has way more difficult drills. I agree that skiing is a sport that requires dynamic balance, but also I think that PMTS has made a serious attempt to define this balance in movement, more so than PSIA. For sure we do not find that level of details in PSIA teaching materials. I think, quite honestly, that PSIA should be ashamed of itself for not putting together better materials which could easily come with a video incorporated like PMTS does as of recently. They are a big organization and most instructors actually lose money to be part of PSIA (certification, clinic, annual fees, etc.) and it would not damage anybody if their literature were presented a little better.
It should be clear by now, I do not hate PSIA, but I hate their materials. So bad, really. I also bought the video from the RM division. Some improvements, but still does not match PMTS' videos. They can do better and if they did it quickly it would be appreciated.
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