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Favorate Micro Brew at a Ski Area - Page 2

post #31 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
My new favorate beer is Shipyard Prelude Special Ale.

It is a darker heavier beer and has 6.8 % alcohol.

They started in Kennybunkport Maine and now reside in Portland.

You can get it at Sugarloaf at the Sugarloaf Inn and on the second floor of the Barker Lodge at Sunday River.
If you like strong ale, grab some Long Trail Double Bag. 7.2%. It's a double alt; a strong brew brewed cold like a lager but with a top fermenting yeast like an ale.

-Ken
post #32 of 54
Latchigo read the top of the thread It says micro brew. Not "tinned"' beer you buy at a gas station Brew. And Utah does have some fine microw brewed beers.
post #33 of 54
Sqautters,good for what Ails you
Hey Utah does Wastch Brewery still make the 2002 unofficil beer of the games?
That was a decnt brew
post #34 of 54
I still see it But I now drink Polygamy Porter. Like they say take a six pack home to the wives.
post #35 of 54
heheheehe
post #36 of 54
Sea Dog Blue Paw. Shipyard's owners own part of Sea Dog so you can get this on tap at some of the Shipyard Brewaries - like at Sugarloaf - under the Shipyard name. It's blueberry beer, but it's the best blueberry beer I have ever had - taste like beer when you're drinking it but the after taste is blueberries - yum! Even Scalce likes it
post #37 of 54
Pilsner Urquell. It's not a microbrew, but it has a unique hoppiness and clean finish that make it ideal for quenching my almost unquenchable thirst after a day on the slopes. Here's one captured in its element after the first quaff:
post #38 of 54
Scapegoat pale ale, montana brewing co (when at big sky)
ubu ale, lake placid brewing company NY (when in the adirondacks)
post #39 of 54
I like the Long Trail Hibernator, and then the regular long trail (draught of course). Second to that would be Magic Hat. Microbrews are the best. Other than that, I drink guinness, bass, harp, and maybe sam.
post #40 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Horse
Here's one captured in its element after the first quaff:
First quaff!?! And that's all that's left! Did you learn to drink at University? In Engineering? Good Job!
post #41 of 54
You must be psychic, Snowsnake. Correct on both questions. Can you predict my immediate future? Here's a glimpse:
post #42 of 54
Since moving to Idaho, my favorite after-ski beers have been
- Powder Hound Ale (from Big Sky Brewing)
- Full Sail
- Fat Tire
- Moose Drool

When I was an easterner, by far my favorites were:
- Blackbeary Wheat (from Long Trail)
- Copper Ale (from Otter Creek)

However I agree with wormly81, the Tuckerman's Ale I had after 2 days on Mt. Washington may have been the best-tasting beer I've ever had
post #43 of 54
Pilsner Urquell is one of my favorites.. i was at one of their restaurants in Hungary, it was awesome. Great, great beer.
post #44 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Horse
You must be psychic, Snowsnake. Correct on both questions. Can you predict my immediate future?
Challenging Super Plumber to a chugging contest?
Engineering your way to a world class hangover?
post #45 of 54
Thread Starter 
I was drinking Long Trail Jay Peak Ale last night.

It was pretty good.
post #46 of 54
I have to say anything by Tommyknocker Brewery, and Fat Tire (New Belgium Brewery).

Come to the Great American Beer Festival in Denver in the Fall and experience all the Great Microbrews of the USA. It's the Superbowl of Microbrew Competitions. Just have a ride lined up home before you go. It's a unique experience. They just give you a glass and turn you loose for all the samples you can drink till the door closes or you drop your glass.
post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by daysailer1
I have to say anything by Tommyknocker Brewery, and Fat Tire (New Belgium Brewery).

Come to the Great American Beer Festival in Denver in the Fall and experience all the Great Microbrews of the USA. It's the Superbowl of Microbrew Competitions. Just have a ride lined up home before you go. It's a unique experience. They just give you a glass and turn you loose for all the samples you can drink till the door closes or you drop your glass.
The British Equivalent is the Great British Beer Festival held in August in Olympia in London

This year's festival was one of the most successful ever with over 46,000 visitors who between them drank 210,000 pints of beer. Over 400 ales on one site is something to behold.

Beer drinkers in England are championed by the Campaign for Real Ale - CAMRA for short. Basically they look for natural ingredients and an non pasteurised product. Beer that is alive. The cellar man’s role is not limited to keeping the lines clean. He should know when a beer is in top condition. You may be able get a bad pint - the end of a barrel, for example. However, you should have no problem sending it back and getting a replacement.

Real ale is also served by hand pumps or gravity dispense straight from the cask. Carbon dioxide cannot be used to pump it through the tap.

As regards the head, well in the South of England a flat pint is preferred. Up North they like a bit of foam but that is achieved by using swan neck taps rather than gas to fizz the beer up. British beer is not warm - it is just cellared rather than chilled by refrigeration.

There is nothing wrong with weaker beers either - provided they are tasty. If I want a session beer 3.7% makes more sense than 5%. If I drink a stronger beer, say Belgian Chimay at 7 to 9%, then I have one bottle and that is me done for the night.

Much of this will not appeal to the big corporations who like to keep things simple and cheap to maximise profits. However, you can vote with your wallet by spurning their products and sticking to the good brews such as those mentioned in this thread.

Think about it. Beer is a volume product that is probably best consumed fairly close to where it was brewed.

post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Pilsner Urquell is one of my favorites.. i was at one of their restaurants in Hungary, it was awesome. Great, great beer.
Pilsner Urquell is a Czech beer. Are they in the restaurant business as well ?

If you like Urquell you should try Budweiser Budvar, which I think is much better. You can get it under that name in Europe, but I think they had a run in with Anheuser Busch and had to change the name for the American market.

Also watch Pilsner Urquell carefully. The attached article suggests that the beer may be under attack from new owners :-

http://www.camra.org.uk/SHWebClass.ASP?WCI=ShowDoc&DocID=2574
post #49 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Latchigo
Pilsner Urquell is a Czech beer. Are they in the restaurant business as well ?
Yep, its a Czech beer, but yep ther are/were in the restaurant business. I has a chicken soup there that (litterall) had half a chicken in it..and it wasn't even cut. Awesome place
post #50 of 54
Normally not a fan of that hippy micro beer crap, but National IPA at The Shed in Stowe if I have to stoop to those levels.
post #51 of 54
Red Tail Ale.

Nothing better.

Alpine.
post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearberry
Polygamy Porter
Seconded! Gotta love this one for the fun logos & slogans "take some home for the wives", "why have just one".
post #53 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vt Skier
Normally not a fan of that hippy micro beer crap, but National IPA at The Shed in Stowe if I have to stoop to those levels.
forget them unwashed patchouli stinkers, real men drink their own urine.
post #54 of 54
How about Wasatch Polygamy Porter? Or Boulder Beer Pale Ale?
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