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Current ski technology about to go by the wayside? - Page 2

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utah49
Wood core skis. As the cost of wood gets higher woodcore skis will be a thing of the past. More like 10 years then 5 years. Or at least, woodcore skis will be a very expensive toy for the well healed skier.
Sorry Utah, not gonna happen. Volkl has their own private source of timber, and as with everything else German, it is extremely well managed. Your 30 to 40 year renewable resource is being replaced at an appropriate pace to keep up with demand.

If all of these 'doom and gloomers' are right about the climate change there will likely be a drop in demand for skis, boards, sleds, and tobagans, giving a little relief to that allocation of the timber industry.

Also, just as Russia has become one of our main sources of titanium, it may very well become a cheep source of timber. Theres lots'o trees out there in Eastern Russia -more than you can shake a stick at.

Here's a bit of ski trivia for you folks who don't know already. Volkl's primary source of labor is prison inmates. It beets making license plates. Ha!
post #32 of 59
>>>If I make it to 73 with no regrets, I might just have to go out in search of some!<<<

Hey, what was that was, why regret? Grin and bear it! Why make life harder than it is already? And in five years we here will all talk about the good old days,no? So I don't regret what Sigi didn't give me, I appreciate what she was to me.

.....Ott
post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZacMan1987
Not to get too far off topic, but Tennessee has had the coldest temps on record for the past 4 days running. Our winters seem to be getting colder, our terrain is opening faster, and I'm going to be skiing powder tomorrow.
Back on topic:
I would say that the gangster aspect of new school will slowly fade. I don't know if this is really considered "technology," but I think that the puffy, punk, crap will dissappear.
That, and hopefully, conventional snowmaking will be replaced with the newer type guns which can blow at temps up to 60 degrees. That could easily lengthen my season by 4+ weeks.
The paradox of global warming is that some areas will get colder.
post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimeral
The paradox of global warming is that some areas will get colder.
Sure they will, and Santa Claus is coming to town!
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15
Sure they will, and Santa Claus is coming to town!

It is true. For instance, the British Isles will get very cold because the tropical north atlantic ocean flow will shut down. That is what gives northern europe and the british isles such a warm climate in a northerly latitude.

Other areas of the globe will get cooler while the overall climate will get warmer. Maybe those not so great ski areas in Scotland will become a big deal in the future.

Tennessee???? Probably not.
post #36 of 59

Props To Old Guys That Ski!

The future..... Wow. remember when everyone thought we'd be on a spaceship with HAL by now??

There is a lot of innovation with regard to ski materials development. Carbon now, maybe graphite (super-electrically charged) will someday comprise not only the core, but also the edges, topsheet, and bases of our skis, the molecular properties of the material alterable enough to fit the specs for any one or all of those component parts of a ski.
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sluff Vertigo
The future..... Wow. remember when everyone thought we'd be on a spaceship with HAL by now??

There is a lot of innovation with regard to ski materials development. Carbon now, maybe graphite (super-electrically charged) will someday comprise not only the core, but also the edges, topsheet, and bases of our skis, the molecular properties of the material alterable enough to fit the specs for any one or all of those component parts of a ski.
Are you old enough to have seen 2001 in the movies? None of us took it seriously....it was just science fiction.
post #38 of 59
I predict women's specific ski shops. This is the biggest growing segment of the ski industry -growing at close to 100% every year. Lock it -in the next 5 to 10 years.
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimeral
Are you old enough to have seen 2001 in the movies? None of us took it seriously....it was just science fiction.
Naah, I read about it in a film history class. That's really interesting though that no one could imagine such a scenario even though it came out about the time man had first stepped on the moon.
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimeral
Are you old enough to have seen 2001 in the movies? None of us took it seriously....it was just science fiction.
Hey what do you mean "none of us"? Real geeks like me who were nerdy enough they never got a date, couldn't possibly have imagined that NASA would so totally mismanage the space program and that the public would just lose interest as a result. (Space was our only hope, man, we knew we'd never get the hot chicks down here : )

I absolutely thought in '67 or whatever that we'd have a serious, rotating for artificial-G, working space station up there by 2001, and that we'd of course have a permanent moonbase.

Interestingly, what that film got right ("right" as a prediction; it got tons of stuff "right" as brilliant cinema) is the commercialization of space. The Hilton, the AT&T space phone, Pan Am shuttle (even if some of the companies have changed since then). Look at how the last days of Russia's MIR were in part sponsored by Pepsi, look at Vigin Intergalactic's planned commercial spaceship "Enterprise", the other sponsored trips with the Russian program (darn those ex-commies are great capitalists!)

Of course I didn't exactly take the intergalactic wormhole in the monolith orbiting Jupiter too seriously . But it did help make good use of some other "renewable resource" on repeated late-night viewings

OK, prediction: After some ground-breaking lawsuit that overturns the various state limited-liability laws like the CO Ski Safety Act, mandatory signed (not "shrink-wrap back of ticket") waivers and mandatory physical/medical screening before allowing people onto the slopes. Horrific idea to me (unless it included psychological screening of snowboarders ) but in this crazy litigious society I can just see it happening. Insurance companies will require it as a reaction to Joe and Dolly Doe wanting skiing to be as safe as a trip to Disney. Bleeech :
post #41 of 59
I think he's an alien life form trying discourage imagination and progress by purporting to speak for the rest of the world.

edit: Speaking of a lack of imagination - who wasn't imagining sex in space?
I bet that new floating Hilton will charge extra for zeroG rooms.
post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sluff Vertigo
but also the edges, topsheet, and bases of our skis, the molecular properties of the material alterable enough to fit the specs for any one or all of those component parts of a ski.
Why do you really need a topsheet?

Why do you really need (semi) rigid bases?

Imagine a snowshoe-style frame of edges with microelectromechanical wonderstuff (MEMWS) stretched between. Camber, flex, waist width, length, riser height, heel/toe pivot all controlled.
post #43 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Why do you really need a topsheet?

Why do you really need (semi) rigid bases?

Imagine a snowshoe-style frame of edges with microelectromechanical wonderstuff (MEMWS) stretched between. Camber, flex, waist width, length, riser height, heel/toe pivot all controlled.
Topsheets are ads. We'll just call them the 'ads'.

Bases will be project a 3D movie screen that shows how you want people to think you're skiing, rather than how you really look.

And call it the Spatula 24 volt Wrench. That has a ring to it.
post #44 of 59

Spatula 24V Wrench - tech glitch

Last night a buddy and I linked our face-shot holograms through the WAN, except when he was on lead I kept getting trees and cliff bands in mine. Any ideas?
post #45 of 59
You're trying to program it like a regular ski, dude.
It's a whole new thang.
And that clown-white just won't cut it.
post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkXS
Hey what do you mean "none of us"? Real geeks like me who were nerdy enough they never got a date, couldn't possibly have imagined that NASA would so totally mismanage the space program and that the public would just lose interest as a result. (Space was our only hope, man, we knew we'd never get the hot chicks down here : )

I absolutely thought in '67 or whatever that we'd have a serious, rotating for artificial-G, working space station up there by 2001, and that we'd of course have a permanent moonbase.

Interestingly, what that film got right ("right" as a prediction; it got tons of stuff "right" as brilliant cinema) is the commercialization of space. The Hilton, the AT&T space phone, Pan Am shuttle (even if some of the companies have changed since then). Look at how the last days of Russia's MIR were in part sponsored by Pepsi, look at Vigin Intergalactic's planned commercial spaceship "Enterprise", the other sponsored trips with the Russian program (darn those ex-commies are great capitalists!)

Of course I didn't exactly take the intergalactic wormhole in the monolith orbiting Jupiter too seriously . But it did help make good use of some other "renewable resource" on repeated late-night viewings

OK, prediction: After some ground-breaking lawsuit that overturns the various state limited-liability laws like the CO Ski Safety Act, mandatory signed (not "shrink-wrap back of ticket") waivers and mandatory physical/medical screening before allowing people onto the slopes. Horrific idea to me (unless it included psychological screening of snowboarders ) but in this crazy litigious society I can just see it happening. Insurance companies will require it as a reaction to Joe and Dolly Doe wanting skiing to be as safe as a trip to Disney. Bleeech :
I stand corrected...I did not take it seriously at the time. As a scifi afficiando I had read many books over the years and while they often predicted things they did not materialize in exactly the manner imagined. Jules Verne and the trip to the moon is a good example. But the movie did get some things right.

Also had a couple of friends working in NASA and the real stuff was pretty exciting but did not match up to the movies. 2001 was fun to watch at the time and we all spent a lot of time over beer and whatever other stimulants were popular at the time trying to figure it all out and what the obelisk meant.
post #47 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ott Gangl
Since I'm going to be 73 in a couple of month, my swan song, skiing and otherwise, might arrive in the next five to ten years. Or maybe not. So I don't worry about it because I am going to give out before the weather does.

But I have no regrets, it's been a great life so far.

....Ott
Ott,

Your'e a young pup-never give in.

Today, after lessons at Copper, we celebrated the 80th birthday of one our instructors, Franko. An incredible gentleman from Germany-first out the door every morning for milk runs, still participating in bump clinics, loved by his clients. A pros pro!!!!

Many Happy Returns Franko!!!!
post #48 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sluff Vertigo
Naah, I read about it in a film history class.
When I was in college, film history class was 'Gangsters and crime in film" and Edward G Robinson.

Man do I feel old now!

Thanks Sluff :
post #49 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j
When I was in college, film history class was 'Gangsters and crime in film" and Edward G Robinson.

Man do I feel old now!

Thanks Sluff :
Sorry, man, I was kidding on that. That was my tongue in cheek response to someone who didn't think I was old enough to have seen it in the theater.

Let's just say I'm old enough to have hung out with the Three Stooges when they were alive and was skiing when the Head 360 and the Hart Javelin were the schnizzle.
post #50 of 59
Who back in the 70s, 80s, and early 90s would have thought in this litigious society that by 2004 every two bit ski area from North Carolina to British Columbia would be scurrying to build elaborate terrain parks and half pipes ENCOURAGING/DARING kids to go for big air, flips, 360s, etc., even going so far as to install rails and other metal obstructions in the middle of ski trails to promote yet more tricks?
My prediction about future: like every other passage they've made, big numbers of aging boomers will drive a surge of activity and focus in the next few years on ski services and offerings aimed at seniors; maybe even seniors-only terrain parks.
post #51 of 59
Seiniors only terrain parks? Are you kidding me. I'm 54 and in good shape, can and do ski everything from bumps to hiking to ski chutes. And, I do catch the nominal amount of air from time to time, but, sliding rails and doing 10-80's or misty's in the half pipe are not in my future. Sure, if I were a few years younger, like maybe 20 years, i would love to do that stuff or at least attempt it. My time spent in terrain parks is spent as a gaper taking pictures and filming the real park rats, my kids and their buddies doing their thing, not mine.
post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj
Who back in the 70s, 80s, and early 90s would have thought in this litigious society that by 2004 every two bit ski area from North Carolina to British Columbia would be scurrying to build elaborate terrain parks and half pipes ENCOURAGING/DARING kids to go for big air, flips, 360s, etc., even going so far as to install rails and other metal obstructions in the middle of ski trails to promote yet more tricks?
My prediction about future: like every other passage they've made, big numbers of aging boomers will drive a surge of activity and focus in the next few years on ski services and offerings aimed at seniors; maybe even seniors-only terrain parks.
Terrain parks for seniors? I don't think so.

I am 63 and in good shape but my body and focus are not the same as they were at 50, let alone at 25 or 30. In addition, an older body does not heal as quickly and a simple injury for a young person can be career ending for a senior.

Personally, I have chosen to continue to ski as long as I can and leave the jumping, most bumps, and extreme steeps to the younger generations. Still ski well and fast but not with the abandon of my youth. Been there, done that.

When I attend an occasional class reunion and see my contemporaries I am happy that I am still very active and planning my next adventure while they are out of shape and complaining. It's just that my definition of "adventure" has mellowed over the years.
post #53 of 59
The main thing my (semi) old body wants is softer landings in these terrain parks...Most of these (east coast) parks..the landing is rock hard...oooof. Also, in the "senior park", how about some medium sized jumps...gimme some old school kickers and some spines.
post #54 of 59
Oh, yeah. I think you meant to say Nerf Parks.

I'm really looking forward to missing a mailbox or rail in my fifties so I can enjoy the down time of a broken rib-lacerated liver or punctured lung. Having done my knees in moguls decades ago, broken my back on avy debris, and split my skull on the ladder of a lift tower....I really feel the park is best left to those still churning out new cells.
post #55 of 59
PTEX will not be neccessary. They will start using a new frictionless rock resistant base for skis. It will also be applied to the topsheet and no more scratches on skis. This will lead to people skiing over your skis for sport and lots more collisions on mountain.
And it sounds like Scotland will be the new mecca of Euro skiing while Switzerland becomes a place to sunbathe and mountain climb.
post #56 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj
My prediction about future: like every other passage they've made, big numbers of aging boomers will drive a surge of activity and focus in the next few years on ski services and offerings aimed at seniors; maybe even seniors-only terrain parks.
IMO, the problem will be not whether senior parks yes or no but
to bring the boomers to the slopes and mountains.
post #57 of 59

Dampening, anti vibration and ski stiffing devices.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiski
As a spin-off of the ‘ski technology gone by the wayside’ thread, what current technology or features do you think won’t be around in 5 years time?

Head’s Intelligence chip springs to mind.
I never could understand how anyone could believe a little chip could have an effect on 300 + lbs of inertia as seen by skis from sudden impact forces from skiing at 20+ MPH in rough bumpy snow conditions. Check out www.floskis.com for a dampening system that does.
post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by adrianflo
I never could understand how anyone could believe a little chip could have an effect on 300 + lbs of inertia as seen by skis from sudden impact forces from skiing at 20+ MPH in rough bumpy snow conditions. Check out www.floskis.com for a dampening system that does.
Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam...LOVELY SPAM, WONDERFUL SPAM!
post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utah49
Ssh Yes wood is a renewable resouce. It just takes 20 to 40 years to renew it's self. At the very high rate of use and the very slow rate of growth in the forest. Wood as a resorce is being consumed faster then we can replace it.
Blame the Japanese for their hunger for wood - zaibatsus and keiretsus have clearcut Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Borneo, The Phillipines, and mainland China, British Columbia, the Pacific Northwest, Brasil, etc. Look at Greenland and Iceland - the Viking settlers cut down all the trees for heat and tools. Just like the early clearcut of cypress trees in the Louisiana bayou country - all the big trees are gone (circa 1880-1920), and most of the tall trees in the swamp are second- or third-growth. Those rainforest hardwoods sit on a poor soil base - Pretty soon the interior of Brasil is going to look like the Sahara Desert.

I like a wood core - and so do many diehard skiers. Sure, it's heavy, but a solid or laminated wood core will last forever, unlike foam - except for Atomic. But the knock on Atomic mid-fat to fat skis is that the bases are not flat. I wish Solomon would make a laminated wood core Pocket Rocket in a longer length.
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