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Garmont Adrenaline Review

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
This is a brief review of my first few runs (downhill) in the Garmont Adrenaline. Boot is a 26.5, my usualy shoes size is about a 9.5. I'm using a custom footbed and had the G Fit liners done by a very good boot fitting shop. My former AT boots were Lowa EVO's, current alpine boots are Lange Comp 120.
Fit: Overall, the Adrealines fit great. I have a pretty average American foot....narrow heel, medium wide forefoot. Some big bumps on the 6th toe and navicular from decades of alpine boot abuse. Only issue I have is that the seam between the tongue and the liner ride over my ankle bone (inside and out), I'll have to figure out how to deal with that. Suggestions accepted.

Warmth: Clearly warmer than my Langes.

Comfort: Except for the ankle, it is a very comfortable boot.

Downhill performance: Compared to the Lowa's is not even close. The lateral support is outstanding. In the range of an advanced perfromance alpine boot. It doesn't measure up to the Lange. It's a bit lower, feelsless substantial and due to the softness of the liner, you don't get the foot to shell closeness that yields instant response. Consider also the rubber sole and the play and stance change in a Frtischi binding so you realy can't get the same postive linkage. That said, it is by far the best AT boot in downhill mode I've used. Great lateral response, smooth, progressive forward flex that's plenty stiff to drive a bigger ski. I skied them on a Volkl AX4 in a 177 (I'm 6' 0"and 173 lbs.) and on an Atomic R:9 in a 180. The Atomic skied particularly well with this boot. Only skied groomed smow.

Climbing performance: I'll give them a try next week. I don't forsee any problems in the climbing area unless the ankle/seam joint starts to rub. I'm used to climbing (climbs of under 2 hrs.) in my Langes, so these will a welcome relief on that score.

Bottom Line: If I wanted to, I could use these as my only boots. If I lived in the west, and wanted to be prepared at any moment to head off piste, I'd probably make them the daily go to boot. In the east, I'll stay with the Langes and use the Garmonts for climbing. In Europe, I'll go with the Garmonts most of the time for the climbing advantage, crampon compatability and for scrambling around in snow and rock and for walking out.
post #2 of 22
That matches up pretty well with my impressions in the shop. Overall, I think Garmont succeeded at what they set out to do, although I'm puzzled as to why the cuff height i 1cm *lower* than the G-Ride/Mega-Ride.
BTW, regarding your reference to the Diamir flat delta, Fritschi actually anticipated by a full decade (through sheer random chance of course) what many racers are now doing with their bindings. A few comments on this available here:
http://www.racestocksports.com/Feedback.htm
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
I've never really had the backseat issue with the Fritschi that others have bemoaned. It does put you in a different position (stance) than most alpine bindings. I find that I adjust to it after a few turns with no ill effects. My only performance knock on the Fritschi is that there's more play in the system than with an alpine binding. This is only an issue when skiing at moderate to high speeds on very hard snow and/or in bounds. Touring and off piste (unless it's super hard) it's a non-issue.
I can't figure out why the cuff would be designed shorter than the Megaride either. The lateral stiffness is quite firm so I guess that added height wouldn't gain you any performance and would add a bit more weight.
I would also strongly suggest that anyone who gets a new pair of Adrenalines should take some time to sand down the sharp edges on the tongue and upper cuff. These babies are like razors. A quick massage with some sandpaper makes them much more user friendly. Wider power strap would be nice too.
post #4 of 22
For some reason, maybe my skinney ankles, I am plagued by tongues in which the edge of the plastic cuts into my ankle. I just cut the seam, trim the plastic narrower than the padding and aqua seal and sometimes tape the thing back together. Glad to hear I'm not the only one with the problem.

I haven't tried the Adrenaline yet but a friend of mine found them surprisingly soft. I didn't ask compared to what. I've been patrolling in some Scarpa Denalis this year and have been real happy with them.

I put an eight mm riser under my free ride heels and they instantly felt normal to me. Things seemed out of wack with the flat ramp angle.
post #5 of 22

Adrenalines rock!!

I have been skiing in a Tecnica TNT Explosion (8) for the past ~ 10 seasons. I recently was looking for an AT boot that I could us in the BC and in the area. I was hoping to buy one boot, not two. Today was my second day in these this season. I am 6'1" and 195#. I ski hard. The Adrenaline is everything that Garmont claims and more. I found the boot to be so stiff that I ended up backing off the two top buckles significantly. Larger ski, faster speeds, Freeride bindings, NO PROBLEM. I am skiing a pair of Stockli Stromrider SSs w/ Frischi Freeride bindings. I am totally new to the backcountry ski scene. I don't feel that I have compromised a thing in terms of performance. This boot will be my "go to" boot regardless of the conditions or location of where I will be skiing. Mammoth is my home area.
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by choucas
This is a brief review of my first few runs (downhill) in the Garmont Adrenaline. Boot is a 26.5, my usualy shoes size is about a 9.5. I'm using a custom footbed and had the G Fit liners done by a very good boot fitting shop. My former AT boots were Lowa EVO's, current alpine boots are Lange Comp 120.

Downhill performance: Compared to the Lowa's is not even close. The lateral support is outstanding. In the range of an advanced perfromance alpine boot. It doesn't measure up to the Lange. It's a bit lower, feelsless substantial and due to the softness of the liner, you don't get the foot to shell closeness that yields instant response. Consider also the rubber sole and the play and stance change in a Frtischi binding so you realy can't get the same postive linkage. That said, it is by far the best AT boot in downhill mode I've used. Great lateral response, smooth, progressive forward flex that's plenty stiff to drive a bigger ski. I skied them on a Volkl AX4 in a 177 (I'm 6' 0"and 173 lbs.) and on an Atomic R:9 in a 180. The Atomic skied particularly well with this boot. Only skied groomed smow.

Bottom Line: If I wanted to, I could use these as my only boots. If I lived in the west, and wanted to be prepared at any moment to head off piste, I'd probably make them the daily go to boot. In the east, I'll stay with the Langes and use the Garmonts for climbing. In Europe, I'll go with the Garmonts most of the time for the climbing advantage, crampon compatability and for scrambling around in snow and rock and for walking out.
Have you tried these with the downhill boot plate in downhill bindings yet?

If so, how did they work?
post #7 of 22
After my initial enthusiasm for the performance of the Adrenalin, I have retired them to strictly AT use. The difference in performance I get from a dedicated alpine boot (Nordica Hot Rod) is significant. Earlier this season, I was skiing the Adrenalin almost exclusively. The change to a performance boot allowed me to drive the skis, and solved some stance issues (backseat). Your mileage may vary, but IMO, while the Adrenalin is a stiff and good AT performer, it can't stand up to the performance of a very high end alpine boot.

PSA: Be sure to keep the hex nuts tightened, and get some blue lock-tite or you will surely lose those tounge retainers. Garmont USA generously sent me a replacement.
post #8 of 22

Good Review

Very good frank review of the Garmont Adrenaline. I have been slowly creeping into the back Country on my new AT setup.
PM Gear Bro Model's 188 Soft Fritche Free Rides and Garmont Adrenaline.

This is a very good setup, but as you stated the AT equipment is not the equal of high end Apline gear,

I started off skiing the Bro's with Freerides, I was happy with the setup but there was just a bit of control missing in more extreem situations
Don't get me wrong its a very capable down hill set up but I found myself going to my LP's with Look bindings whenever I was going to hit steeps and hard snow, they were just a bit better.
I have now skied on the same Soft Bro's @ 188 with Solomon Demo bindings. Its not the ski its the bindings. The free rides are too high off the snow. Again very capable but for high end big mountain sking, but about 85% of the control of a good alpine binding.

The past 3 days I have started skiing my AT setup mostly inbounds with the Garmonts. The garmonts are everything you say, I like them they are light and comfortable. the issues here is vibram soles, light
weight and ability to switch from alpine to walk are a nessesary evil for touring use (And that is great) But for the downhill part of the tour (Skiing) I am now another 1/2 inch off the snow and feel that I have lost an additional 10% in downhill performance.

I do not feel as stable and in control as I do with a pure downhill setup.
I will continue to ski these inbounds in the near future because I want to be comfortable on this setup when I ski back country.

So bottom line great set-up Very nice comfortable boots (Probabaly better than allot of peoples alpine boots) but NOT the equal of a high performace alpine boot.

So for very aggressive sking AT equipemnt is not the same as alpine.
For a less agressive skier 1 set-up for all AT and lift serviced? not sure
post #9 of 22
Im on G-rides and Mega Rides and they don't begin to compare to my old Atomic plug boots (w/ plugs removes) in terms of control. I don't think its the AT binding so much as the AT boot. But there's no way I'll tour in an alpine boot. Haven't tried the Adrenaline myself yet
post #10 of 22
Cirque- was the backseat from the low ramp angle of the adrenalins or something else.

I've been on the lookout for AT boots that I can afford, school + new bro's/ naxos wears on ya. I'd keep my diablos for inbounds (on another setup besides the bros) There's is definately a trade off in performance.

MTT- did your freerides loose the downhill performance in all conditions or just on hardpack. What I'm gathering... and hoping is that Pow performance is still solid, but the AT bindings haven't less torsional rigidity have a harder time holding an edge in harder snow.
post #11 of 22
RJP - are you xtrpickels? If so I won't shill those boots to you again
post #12 of 22
RJP, to revisit the history on this...Last year in March I bought V-Mantras and equipped them with Fritchi FR bindings. I didn't acquire the Adrenalin boots until June, so, I skiied the AT setup with alpine boots to start. My reviews at the time reflected a lot of enthusiasm for the ski, and noted only a bit of compromise resulting from the higher, zero ramp angle binding. I did not have a stance issue, and was able to ski any slope or condition.

This year, I began my ski season on the Garmont/Mantra/Freeride combo, and continued that through January. I was getting killed on difficult conditions like breakable crust, crud, Sierra Cement, and just wan't feeling confident on difficult and narrow chutes or off cornices where I wanted to "stick" edges off a short drop, or ahead of a choke. I added Booster Straps to try to improve downhill performance. I returned to using my old Technica TNT 8 alpine boots in February (quick binding adjustment), and noticed a significant improvement. If a little bit is good, more is better....A couple weeks ago, I upgraded to Nordica Hot Rods with a custom performance fit (thanks to SierraJim for the time and strategic punches, grinds and stretches). Wow, I have my skiing back, and its fun again. The Hot Rod has a greater forward lean, higher ramp and is much stiffer (130 flex). This allows me to overcome any weakness in the Freeride binding linkage, and when combined with downhill bindings makes skis feel very solid (think of running on rails).

The Garmont Adrenalin is a decent touring boot with good, but not excellent, downhill performance. While much lighter than downhill boots, it is slightly on the heavy and stiff side for long tours, but it has enough flexibility to allow long hikes on skins, and is comfortable enough, and has decent tread and shape for boot packing. Its performance downhill is exceptional FOR A TOURING BOOT. In the backcountry, I ski more conservatively anyway because I'm not fond of the idea of taking large risks in inaccessible areas. Besides, when you hike for turns, you want to make the most of them.

The Adrenalin is not a substitute for a high performance alpine skier inbounds. In the resort, we experience cut-up powder, crud, moguls and hard conditions that are unlike what I ski backcountry. These irregularities and just the greater downhill mileage and speed, require that you be able to drive a big ski more powerfully. In the earlier post, I described it more like riding the ski, rather than driving it. Its comfortable, it works well, but its not high performance. As much as I like the Adrenalin in backcountry, I don't believe it is ready for prime-time at the resort, or even in side country with minimal hiking. As soon as skinning or bootpacking are brought into the equation, the result changes, and the Adrenalin becomes the boot of choice.

Conclusion: The Garmont Adrenalin sacrafices some uphill performance in order to be a better downhill boot. It makes some sacrifices in downhill mode as well, but I don't know of a better performing AT boot. I agree with Jonathon, that Garmont probably accomplished what they set out to do. Compared to other AT boots, this may be the highest performing system available. I found the performance compromises in the downhill aspects of this boot to be too great to make it the only boot I would own or use. Compared to high performance alpine boots, the Adrenalin is clearly outclassed in the downhill mode. Touring in stiff alpine boots is just painful. The Adrenalin is a comfortable wear all day, and a good hiker. I don't expect to be the first to the top of the mountain, and this boot is not for death march tours. It suits my alpine touring needs uphill and downhill, with an acceptable level of performance compromise for backcountry. I do not recommend it as an everyday resort boot unless you expect to do a lot of walking/skinning/hiking, or are involved in rescue.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
RJP, to revisit the history on this...Last year in March I bought V-Mantras and equipped them with Fritchi FR bindings. I didn't acquire the Adrenalin boots until June, so, I skiied the AT setup with alpine boots to start. My reviews at the time reflected a lot of enthusiasm for the ski, and noted only a bit of compromise resulting from the higher, zero ramp angle binding. I did not have a stance issue, and was able to ski any slope or condition.

This year, I began my ski season on the Garmont/Mantra/Freeride combo, and continued that through January. I was getting killed on difficult conditions like breakable crust, crud, Sierra Cement, and just wan't feeling confident on difficult and narrow chutes or off cornices where I wanted to "stick" edges off a short drop, or ahead of a choke. I added Booster Straps to try to improve downhill performance. I returned to using my old Technica TNT 8 alpine boots in February (quick binding adjustment), and noticed a significant improvement. If a little bit is good, more is better....A couple weeks ago, I upgraded to Nordica Hot Rods with a custom performance fit (thanks to SierraJim for the time and strategic punches, grinds and stretches). Wow, I have my skiing back, and its fun again. The Hot Rod has a greater forward lean, higher ramp and is much stiffer (130 flex). This allows me to overcome any weakness in the Freeride binding linkage, and when combined with downhill bindings makes skis feel very solid (think of running on rails).

The Garmont Adrenalin is a decent touring boot with good, but not excellent, downhill performance. While much lighter than downhill boots, it is slightly on the heavy and stiff side for long tours, but it has enough flexibility to allow long hikes on skins, and is comfortable enough, and has decent tread and shape for boot packing. Its performance downhill is exceptional FOR A TOURING BOOT. In the backcountry, I ski more conservatively anyway because I'm not fond of the idea of taking large risks in inaccessible areas. Besides, when you hike for turns, you want to make the most of them.

The Adrenalin is not a substitute for a high performance alpine skier inbounds. In the resort, we experience cut-up powder, crud, moguls and hard conditions that are unlike what I ski backcountry. These irregularities and just the greater downhill mileage and speed, require that you be able to drive a big ski more powerfully. In the earlier post, I described it more like riding the ski, rather than driving it. Its comfortable, it works well, but its not high performance. As much as I like the Adrenalin in backcountry, I don't believe it is ready for prime-time at the resort, or even in side country with minimal hiking. As soon as skinning or bootpacking are brought into the equation, the result changes, and the Adrenalin becomes the boot of choice.

Conclusion: The Garmont Adrenalin sacrafices some uphill performance in order to be a better downhill boot. It makes some sacrifices in downhill mode as well, but I don't know of a better performing AT boot. I agree with Jonathon, that Garmont probably accomplished what they set out to do. Compared to other AT boots, this may be the highest performing system available. I found the performance compromises in the downhill aspects of this boot to be too great to make it the only boot I would own or use. Compared to high performance alpine boots, the Adrenalin is clearly outclassed in the downhill mode. Touring in stiff alpine boots is just painful. The Adrenalin is a comfortable wear all day, and a good hiker. I don't expect to be the first to the top of the mountain, and this boot is not for death march tours. It suits my alpine touring needs uphill and downhill, with an acceptable level of performance compromise for backcountry. I do not recommend it as an everyday resort boot unless you expect to do a lot of walking/skinning/hiking, or are involved in rescue.
Perfect!
There it is ladies and gentlemen

^^^^ THE TRUTH^^^^^
post #14 of 22
Thanks guys!! I think I found my AT boot...well, at least the one I'll lean towards and try on first!!

....and MTT I've had the exact same experience as you with freerides...I've skied two stiffish skis with freerides and both have felt VERY loose underfoot and I was forced to bank the ski way over before the edges would engage...the effect was so pronounced that I just don't think I can ski the way I want to with these bindings and will likely hike with regular alpine skis whenever possible...thinking of trying a 1/2 deg base bevel (maybe even 0 deg) on my AT skis to see if that helps tighten things up...we'll see :
post #15 of 22
I had the Mantras tuned with a fresh base grind, 0.75 base 2.0 side and zero detuning at the tips and tails. They hook up just fine now, but are not grabby. Put the best tune you can on your skis and do not de-tune until you try them when using free-rides. I don't find Fritschi binding slop to be as bad as others are reporting, but certainly noticeable.
post #16 of 22
I took the bases on my Bro's to .5 base, I have been sking them the past two days with my Solomon alpine boots, I feel real good right now edge tune dosent mean a thing when the snow is soft, so I still don't know.

I am having fun though

Bro's with Free Rides are pretty good.
post #17 of 22
I'd have to concur with the review given by sir cirquemeister.

But, luckily, in this amazing la nina here in the PNW I've skied them in pow or slightly cut up crud 98 percent of the time.

And they've performed amazingly. At least for me. I am glad the mantras, which are a great AT setup, are 177. I bet the Adrenalin would have had a harder time driving the 184, (for me at 5' 4")

But maybe not so with Alpine boots.

But yes, in the two percent of difficult snow, read hard skier packed resort snow, I've skied, they've not driven my skis as well as my tecnica tnt's do with my regular old Axis X pros. I think I am gonna get some intuition liners, and a pair of gotamas for my tecnica boots.

That way I can dedicate my AT setup to what I had intended them for: BackCountry Ascents and Descents. ( To start with, I've got a few Pacific Northwest Volcanoes on my list to hit this spring/summer.)

:-)
post #18 of 22

Adrenalins for SALE, 26.5 great condition

So, thought I'd piggyback on this thread since it's on topic,

yep, great AT boot. good lightness, stiffness compromise. i have only been doing very short, but quite steep and funky snow descents, so I've been choosing my alpine boot more often, so I decided to go ahead and liquidate these (especially since my season is over w/ ankle surgery next week)

so, make an offer. they have about 10 day's, an added rear spoiler for more forward lean. I only used my old intuitions and want to keep those, so I'm selling shell only.

shell, $250 or offer. (I paid $650 w/ liner, figure intuitions are @$100, so thought this sounded like a good deal for someone...

cheers,
wade
post #19 of 22

GARMONT ADRENALIN Flex Index?

If you had to compare to these DH Boots, what would the flex index be? 100? 80? ????

Is anyone using them with DH bindings?
I am assuming that would be a different ride than using an AT binding. ???
post #20 of 22

Impact 8

Hey guys, here's a question.

I currently ride a Salomon Impact 8 on Xwing Tornado skis. Being that I live in Ontario I do mostly eastern canadian skiing. Which is almost always on-piste and also fairly light.

I am flying to BC to kickinghorse to enjoy some real mountains and snow and have been wondering what do you guys recommend for boots. Are the Impact 8's good enough? I find that last year they were a great boot but lately my feet feel like a truck ran them over. And I can't get the setting right, it's either too lose or too tight. I was looking into the Garmont Adrenaline as an option but then I don't really want to sacrifice the on-piste fun and performance. I like to ride pretty hard. The Lange Banshee sound like a great boot too.

I guess the question is, do I pick up a boot for BC/backcountry exclusively and keep my impact 8's for piste in eastern canada. Or do I get a new better all around boot. Or do I pick up a more performance "resort" boot and sacrifice a little in the back country.

Anyways some more info, I'm 6'2, 200 pounds. I think my level of skiing is high, at least on piste. This year I won't be doing any cat/heli skiing but hoping to get out in the glades and bowls. Next year maybe hopefully some cat skiing.

cheers mates
post #21 of 22
FWIW, the Impact 8s are hardly a race fit boot. I doubt you would notice a huge performance hit by going to a well-fit adrenaline or Endorphine / Axon. The AT boots have the walk mode, and are comfortable and warm. Avoid to temptation to go too large, especially if you will be resort riding on these. The Adrenaline can be a reasonable replacement of your current boots. the Adrenaline does AT really good, but I'll stick with my conclusion two years ago in this thread that AT boots are not an alpine boot replacement for skiers that demand high performance.

If you really want to dial it up, get a very high quality alpine boot like the Doberman or Aggressor (abducted stance), and downsize. Have a bootfitter punch and grind to fit, and add a footbed. You'll wonder how you ever skied in anything else.
post #22 of 22
Are you going to be hiking? If not, stay with an alpine boot. While I like and use AT boots frequently, if I'm not hiking I'm using my Langes. The Adrenaline is a very good AT boot and it works very well but it's not the same as an alpine boot. I know guys who ski in their AT boots all the time but most people will be happier in the alpine boots.

Oh yeah, have fun at Kickinghorse
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