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Ski technology gone by the wayside - Page 2

post #31 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by josseph
A few years ago, I remember seeing some folks wearing this metal rod attached from a brace on their thighs/hips(?) to the back of their ski bindings. I remember vaguely that the gadget purported to place the skier always in a dynamically correct fore/aft position.

That fad didn't get very far.
Actually, Jimmy Heuga used them for a while when he was still skiing in a standing position (mid-to-late 1980s). They helped him maintain fore-aft balance that was hindered by his MS.

These days, Jimmy is skiing in a sit-ski, having lost most motor control of his legs. To find out what he's doing, visit The Heuga Center website.
post #32 of 209
CrudMeister,
I think the first hinged clam shell boot was the Raichle Red Hot, fiberglass shell, leather cuff. the hinge was full length down the middle of the sole. You could use the inner boot as an apres ski boot if you wanted to.

Bong
post #33 of 209
Nobody has stated the obvious:
leather boots with laces
wooden skis
bamboo poles with BIG baskets
wool outerwear
cable bindings
beartrap bindings
post #34 of 209
Thread Starter 
Geze SE-3, upward release toe.
Burt "retractables"
Fischer skis that had a bulge under the boot area for better grip.
Salomon Monocoque, where the shell was the bearing support of the ski, not the core.
Fischer Revolution skis, where the tail was wider than the tip.
Flo pacs in boots
post #35 of 209
So this is the last season for the Rossi Softs? Cool! I'm buying three pairs on eBay after the prices drop!
post #36 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Fischer skis that had a bulge under the boot area for better grip.
The current Fischer skis
Explorer 60-50-59-50-55
Orbiter 48-40-48-39-43
Jupiter 56-48-57-48-53
(among others) all have the bulge, as shown by the sidecuts above. Granted, they're labeled nordic skis, but it's not gone yet. What about Plasma Edge, though?

PS. I was tempted to dispute 'air channel' too, on this basis.
post #37 of 209
Yes. The Claw can still be had at http://www.clawskis.com/

Speaking of 'clamshell' boots, does anyone remember a boot/binding system that had no toepiece, the boot only being held at the heel? Somehow Caber comes to mind, but that was many moons ago . . .
post #38 of 209
No one mentioned the "carving hybrid" Elan Stealth
87-45-87
which survived only 2 seasons in the late 90´s
Might remain the narrowest alpine ski ever

As to 4 edges in one ski, check www.kneissl.com - the Power Glide 16 32
post #39 of 209
Spademan Bindings
The GLM method (ski instruction)
The skimobile at Cranmore, NH, a quite unique lift it was!
The single chair (only a handful, if that, left)
run-away straps (still used on blades and snowboards, but gone from skis)
ski "ballet"
MANY smaller local areas.
post #40 of 209
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkracer
No one mentioned the "carving hybrid" Elan Stealth
87-45-87
which survived only 2 seasons in the late 90´s
Might remain the narrowest alpine ski ever

As to 4 edges in one ski, check www.kneissl.com - the Power Glide 16 32

Got a pair, still ski them from time to time
post #41 of 209
Bong: you are correct. it was Raichle. Henke had the first buckle boots. Their slogan was "Are you still lacing while others are racing?"
post #42 of 209
Elan Stealth 87-45-87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Got a pair, still ski them from time to time
Does anybody think there is no telepathy?
Today, a friend of mine called to tell me he found a pair with an Atomic rental binding, everything for about 35 bucks.
I will get them!
post #43 of 209
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkracer
Elan Stealth 87-45-87
Does anybody think there is no telepathy?
Today, a friend of mine called to tell me he found a pair with an Atomic rental binding, everything for about 35 bucks.
I will get them!

IIRC, thats what I paid for mine about 3 years ago, sans bindings but still in the wrapper. A bit of advise: unless the snow is hardpack, leave them in the rack. Please post your "review" over in the review section, I am sure everyone is waiting with baited breath.
post #44 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
IIRC, thats what I paid for mine about 3 years ago, sans bindings but still in the wrapper. A bit of advise: unless the snow is hardpack, leave them in the rack. Please post your "review" over in the review section, I am sure everyone is waiting with baited breath.
Sure I will, someday in January
Unfortunately, I know the ski already, as I post in the other thread (the worst ski ever), I could test it when it was new back in 1999 or so.
It was on hardpack and it was not so bad (and not good, either)
I really won´t be that stupid as to take it to some fresh powder - or, just for the fun, I will - if there is any in this part of the world
I may even try them in gates
This monumentally called "carving hybrid of the second generation" does deserve it!
post #45 of 209
Magnetic dampening......yet another Dynastar gimmick. If you put your skis too close to your cassette tapes it would ruin them.
post #46 of 209
Ahh! remember "Nishizawas" that had the triangular shape...really narrow tip to a progressively wider tail.
post #47 of 209
Ski boards / snowblades

Also things like 50mm lifters.
post #48 of 209
Thread Starter 
how could we forget...

Salomon:
Pro-pulse bindings
Suspension bindings
Pro-pulse boots

Marker:
Select Control

Ess:
For and aft bindings, that can be moved from ski to ski
post #49 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
Magnetic dampening......yet another Dynastar gimmick. If you put your skis too close to your cassette tapes it would ruin them.
Heyyyyyyyy! My skis resemble that remark!

Actually, the "magnet" is a BABE magnet

AM.
post #50 of 209
Those awful skis with the changeable weights for tips and tails to simulate different lengths...

Who made those?
post #51 of 209
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
Those awful skis with the changeable weights for tips and tails to simulate different lengths...

Who made those?

they were Fritzmeyer Duo's, mentioned probably in my first post.
post #52 of 209

Hexcel

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Honeycomb cores from Hart and Hexel
I owned a pair of Hexcel skis from the late 70's (maybe early 80's). I really liked them. My parents still have both of their Hexcel skis.

As I recall, the Hexcel honeycomb core was extremely advanced for its time. The skis they made were light and responsive.

Of course the downside was mounting the bindings. NO ski shop wanted to touch my skis for fear of screwing up the binding mounts and having me sue them.

I understand Hexcel is still in business making honeycomb cores for airplane wings and other high strengh, lightweight applications.

When did they finally quit making skis?

Thx...Doug
post #53 of 209
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dgangi
I owned a pair of Hexcel skis from the late 70's (maybe early 80's). I really liked them. My parents still have both of their Hexcel skis.

As I recall, the Hexcel honeycomb core was extremely advanced for its time. The skis they made were light and responsive.

Of course the downside was mounting the bindings. NO ski shop wanted to touch my skis for fear of screwing up the binding mounts and having me sue them.

I understand Hexcel is still in business making honeycomb cores for airplane wings and other high strengh, lightweight applications.

When did they finally quit making skis?

Thx...Doug
Not sure when they stopped, but the skis were marketed under the Hanson name into the early to mid 80's.
post #54 of 209
Hexcel is still making honeycombs, including Kevlar ones. Can't you just see skis made from that!?!

On their website, they note that they are still building components for snowsports equipment.
post #55 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Not to steal all the thunder, what else?

A great (and nostalgic) list.

But let's not forget some of the bindings.
Classics that used plates on the boots - Cubco and Miller
Others that used a full length plate with the binding itself - Gerstch and Besser
The one that could allow the ski to release but then would snap it back into place - Burt.
And then the one without a toepiece - Spademan.

Anyone remember the Hanson "Moose River Hummer" boot?

And in the "what were they (not) thinking" category, how is it that ski equipment "innovators" have come up with all this crap but overlooked the simple concept of actually giving skis enough shape to work well?

KLF
post #56 of 209
How about the leather boot. Also- an old safety binding called SkiFree - Marker I think? And the Besser binding. This was a plastic plate fitted to the bottom of your boot which would always match the rental binding. Injuries in the first year of use dropped 95%

One single long pole for balance instead of two poles. Bamboo poles with metal baskets attached with leather to the pole.

The smartly dressed woman (full length dress)... in a ski school.

bear claw bindings of course

long straps around boot to binding... for safety.

San Marcos boots- came almost up to the knee.

safety straps so ski won't run away in a fall but lets the skis beat the snot out of you on your way down!!!!!

That gawd-awful silver wax for warm snow I think. Remember that stuff?

metal shoe tree to keep your leather boots straight.

Swiss yodeling music to ski by.

OK- so some of this stuff ain't techy- just nostalgic... sue me! hehehehe
post #57 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by jyarddog
That gawd-awful silver wax for warm snow I think. Remember that stuff?
That looked just like re-badged antiseize compound? How could we forget?
I bet half never sold and every last squeez tube is now on FleaBay.

Eeeew.

...running to the shower now to wash my hands off after typing that. . .
post #58 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
how could we forget...

Salomon:
Pro-pulse bindings
Suspension bindings
Pro-pulse boots

Marker:
Select Control

Ess:
For and aft bindings, that can be moved from ski to ski
Man! I LOVED my Salomon Pro-Pulse bindings...had them mounted on a pair of Volkl P-50 Race Carvers. At the time, this was considered one hot set up. The skis themselves were great, but that Pro-Pulse binding was one heck of unit: it was big, tall and heavy, but it definately increased the power underfoot. Talk about a powerful finish.

Funny...I also had Select Controls (left 'em in Position II 85% of the time) and Geze bindings. The Geze were on Elan Comprex S skis...now that was a great ride for its time!
post #59 of 209
Se with the Electra bases.
post #60 of 209
Hey- I forgot the Marker select control thing. I still have my M51 turbo SC's. I too forgot have the time they are there but in the unpacked, Cacade Cement on Hood #1 does make a difference. Nice little gadget. It does work. Not necessary but then... I like gadgets. hehehe

that silver wax came in bars with two other bars. The silver rubbed on fast and a lot. And yes, you could get it on your nose just like I do with anti-seize compound, which is dynamite stuff on threaded fittings. Anyone who wrenches on cars knows what I am talking about. Slatz is one! Damn good wrencher as well as skier!

Geze bindings. I had the Geze Star-Step. There was a lever on each heel. You would slide the lever out and away from the ski horizontally and the heel piece would move to the rear! Now, with the long leather strap you already had wrapped around your boot, you could kind of Tellmark or cross country until you got to the next hill. Then you would lower your heel and rotate the lever back and the heel piece would slide back to your heel, and away you go down the next hill.

Geze now makes sliding doors in Europe I think.
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