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suggestions for coming off injury?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Hi all,

I'm going to try skiing Friday.

For those of you that have had major injurys I'm looking for what to expect when I get back out there. I know, take it easy, listen to my body, etc.

Reminder, it was a femur break (7 1/2 months now). TI rod still in the bone. Most of the daily pains are gone. PT says most of my strength is back however walking down stairs and running are not comfortable. Not stabing pain, manageable dull pain now. climbing stairs is almost normal. Most of the discomfort is almost like swollen joints. (knee/hip) but not really painful.

will have the ice pack waiting for me at the end of the day.
post #2 of 22

Woo hoo!

Best of luck, dchan!

It was nothing like having a rod in one's femur; but I broke some ribs and collapsed a lung in a skydiving accident. The docs told me it would be six-months before I could jump again (and said I shouldn't, etc., etc.).

Six months to the day I was out the door into the fresh altitude air! While a bit nervous, it was great! When everything held together I gained confidence and eased back into the routine. I'm sure you'll do fine; here's to hoping so!!!
post #3 of 22
Take 2 ibuprophen or 1 aleve before you go out. Take it slow on the first day, ski stuff that is normally below your skill level and practice rudimentary skills. Stay away from the bumps for a few days, at least till you get your ski legs back...which could take longer due to the injury. Know your limit...if you are tired stop, you wouldn't want to make a silly mistake because you were tired. Have fun!
post #4 of 22
[quote=dchan] I know, take it easy, listen to my body, etc.
QUOTE]

I think you've got a good start with these 2, and it's pretty obvious what "listen to your body means". If you encounter pain, then stop. As to "taking it easy", I'd suggest you apply this to terrain, conditions, and duration. I'd stay on groomed runs, on good snow, and pace myself.

Don't stop when you're tired, stop BEFORE you're tired. We all know we're more apt to encounter injury when fatigued. Coming off an injury you're more susceptible to this fact than you normally would be.

I'd allow myself to progress slowly and go for longer durations only after I had satisfied myself that my body had recovered from my previous time on the snow, with no ill effects. Be patient with yourself and don't fall trap to the "well...I've been out a few times without incident, so I must be back to normal". You're just getting to the point where you have the opportunity to get back to normal. I have to admit that for me, it's easier to give this advise than follow it. I've tried to come back from injuries too quickly, way too often in the past.

Good luck with your venture back into the sport. Take it easy and listen to your body and you'll be fine. Oh, and I may drop my din a couple of notches for a while.
post #5 of 22
Don't take pain killers before you ski. If it hurts stop! Better to get a little in and see how you are the next day and then do it again than to put your recovery back by a month because you over-did it.

Have some Lagavulin (straight up) to go with that Ice pack.
post #6 of 22
The purpose of the Ibuprophen or aleve is to relax the muscle so it does not tighten up, not to kill or mask the pain, compared to the amount needed to "kill" the pain of this type of injury, this is a very LOW dose. It was recommended to me by a specialist that I take it when I returned to skiing after doing in my knee several years ago.
post #7 of 22
Ibuprofen or aleve is NOT a muscle relaxant....

Also NSAIDS have a slight effect on mental coordination (which wears off when taken regularly)....

Taking paracetamol 2 four times a day would be a better option .... then take the NSAIDS after skiing when the coordination is less of a problem...
post #8 of 22
Hey, Don't shoot me! I was just passing on what I was told.:
post #9 of 22
Work on stance and balance on mild terrain. You may develop problems if you unconciously try to protect the injured limb. You need to really develop the ski-specific muscles again and feel comfortable with your surroundings. Do not push it.
post #10 of 22
Muscle relaxant eh? O.K. sounds good to me. Take a little before you go out, but I still think I would go for the Lagavulin muscle relaxant instead.
post #11 of 22
If you´re a good skier don´t take it as a big issue and ski reasonably but with enough confidence.
A bone break should be okay after 7.5 months and skiing groomers is less stress than running or climbing stairs.
Individual experience shared by laymen is seldom transferable but:
I started skiing after (succesively) 3 hip operations including two replacements. Got back to racing.
What worked for me:
when the doc allows me to ski - the docs tend to be over-carefull - then it´s 150%:
"don´t think twice - it´s all right"
It has been.
Well, maybe do think twice but not so much as to become frightened. Fear is no good companion when skiing.
I intentionally put some other perspective to encourage you.
A flood of best-intended and valuable advice might contribute to your feeling as a handicapped person with a big problem.
Which, I believe and I wish you, is NOT the case.
You just broke your leg.
Like Bode Miller did at the 2001 World Championships.
I keep my fingers crossed.
post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 

Whew!!!

Got out on the snow Friday. Firm pack groomed snow everywhere.
Decided I would take it easy and made a run down the beginner lift and see how it felt. Wheeee. I sure missed this. Felt good as long as I was being progressive with very little skidding. everytime I let the skis drift and skid, OW!. the Vibration a little uncomfortable but managable. Talk about immediate feedback.

I guess I better avoid the gliding wedges for a little longer. But longing for more I headed up to some easy blues. I stayed out for about 1.5 hours and just cruised around the blues enjoying being out there.

I wasn't getting tired and there was not really any pain but I decided I better call it a day and see how it felt in the morning. I don't need to over do it and make it worse.

This morning I got up and it felt pretty good. I worked the at the learning center meeting and greeting customers, directing traffic etc and then ventured out onto the snow after morning rush was over. Still feeling pretty good but I could feel the affects from Friday now. I had not over done it but I guess I needed more time for the joints to recover from the skiing of Friday.

I'll remember to stop as soon as I start to feel fatigue in the joints and then maybe rest a day. and try to progress from there.

Boy if felt good to be gliding.

DC
post #13 of 22
It hurts just reading about this dchan.

But I am glad to hear that you are back. Take it easy, take no chances. Best of luck!
post #14 of 22
I don't like the sound of your feeling pain in a skid, dchan. Your description was that the vibration hurt. I presume you mean the pain was associated with the rod in your leg. I'd give the surgeon a call and ask him whether that should occur or whether maybe you need just a bit more healing. There's no way you can ski and not skid some. Pain in the soft tissues is expected, but not pain in the bone.
post #15 of 22
If properly healed, the bone at the site of fracture will actually be thicker, denser, and stronger due to callus formation around the break. A callus is excessive bone formation about the point of healing.

The short and not technical (layman's) version: Ti rod(s) are placed to aid in longitudinal strength during healing as well as to function as a lattice-work to give new bone something to grow along. When the two ends of the bone do not line up well or fractured area is comprised of many small peices between the ends of the bone, the Ti rods are used. Ti is used because it is bio-compatible, light, and rigid.

It is a mental thing, but I would be less concerned about the actual break/injury and more concerned about getting the leg musculature and joints working again and functioning as before. I think you are experiencing a muscular/joint learning curve, if you will.

Best of luck!

-Scott
post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
I don't like the sound of your feeling pain in a skid, dchan. Your description was that the vibration hurt. I presume you mean the pain was associated with the rod in your leg. I'd give the surgeon a call and ask him whether that should occur or whether maybe you need just a bit more healing. There's no way you can ski and not skid some. Pain in the soft tissues is expected, but not pain in the bone.
The pain was in the knee and hip. Knee mostly, not the bone. It's where I expected it as that's where all the swelling is and where all the pain I've been having while rehabing has been. Ortho told me to expect that kind of discomfort.

But thanks for your concern.

DC
post #17 of 22
Hi David- Glad to hear that you are back on the snow at last (and the season is still young!) Good advice and information from Scott K. Some misinformation from others- the use of a non-steroidal (or even aspirin) prior to activity as an anti-inflammatory will not prevent you from noticing pain that may indicate injury. Any possible effect of non-steroidals on "mental coordination" (actually, it is dizziness or drowsiness that has been reported) is very unlikely at low doses- I would have no concerns about skiing "under the influence". The use of paracetamol (acetominophen- Tylenol- to us on this side of the pond) will have analgesic but not the desired anti-inflammatory benefits. Stay away from any kind of "muscle relaxant" while skiing- these all have significant effects on alertness, coordination and reaction time.

Good luck in your continued recovery!
post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 

Drugs

I know which drugs I need and which drugs to avoid. Thanks everyone for trying to help in this area.

Anti-inflamatories like Aleve are what I usually use. I usually don't use them on one day workouts unless the swelling isn't almost completly controled with ice.
On multi day trips I will often take one per day after the first day. I've been doing this already for osteo-arthritis so I'm up to speed on what works for my body.

I've tried a few others and except for relefan, most of them just don't work for me.

DC
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by dp
Any possible effect of non-steroidals on "mental coordination" (actually, it is dizziness or drowsiness that has been reported) is very unlikely at low doses-!

dizziness falls in the 3-9% category ... over here that is listed as "common" in our product info....
Somnolence is about 1%.... still does not make the "infrequent" category

From memory (as the above are) there are about 3-4 central nervous system side effects listed that fall in the 3-9% range(not just dizziness or drowsiness).... & about half a dozen or so over 1%.... (for naproxen).... (that is from the product info clinical trials reporting)

The effects tend to decrease with regular use & become somewhat less of a problem....


We are OBLIGED legally to attach warning statements to these drugs for this reason....

but what would I know..... (or the people that reviewed the clinical trials data.... or the investigators... or the guys that review the data to generate the lists we are required to follow re warning labels....)

Want me to look up & list diclofenac, naproxen, ibuprofen?
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
I've been doing this already for osteo-arthritis so I'm up to speed on what works for my body.
DC
I was about to say it sounded a lot like arthritis; I had some injury induced arthritis. I had a little repair job done on my wrist (long story). I fell on it one day and thought it was broken again; I couldn't lift a cake of soap. The doc at emerge said I had arthritis in it (so did x-rays). Well since I didn't notice it before the fall I figured there was some sort of strain. He would have had me on a steady diet of coated ASA and on a fast-track to getting my wrist fixed. My mom said to take these "herbs" called JOI from sunrider (http://stores.freshairfoundation.com/cataloglist.html ). Holy Crow they are a lot more expensive than they used to be! I'm not a share holder, nor a member of their pyramid marketing scheme; they just worked for me.

Every now and then the arthritis acts up. A couple of years ago when shovelling snow and banging the shovel unexpectedly into the concrete my wrist noticed pain, similar to what you would get jarring your skis along. When ever my arthritis acts up, a few days of these and I am back to normal.
post #21 of 22
More misinformation - from the Naprogesic product info

"Incidence greater than 1%:

Gastrointestinal: The most frequent complaints reported related to the gastrointestinal tract. They were: constipation* , heartburn* , abdominal pain* , nausea* , dyspepsia, diarrhoea, stomatitis.

Central Nervous System: Headache* , dizziness* , drowsiness* , lightheadedness, vertigo.

Dermatologic: Itching (pruritus)* , skin eruptions* , ecchymoses* , sweating, purpura.

Special Senses: Tinnitus* , hearing disturbances, visual disturbances.

Cardiovascular: Oedema* , dyspnoea* , palpitations.

General: Thirst.

* Incidence of reported reactions between 3% and 9%. Those reactions occurring in less than 3% of the patients are unmarked.

Incidence less than 1%:

PROBABLE CAUSAL RELATIONSHIP:

The following adverse reactions were reported less frequently than 1% during controlled clinical trials and through voluntary reports since marketing. The probability of a causal relationship exists between the drug and these adverse reactions.

Gastrointestinal: Abnormal liver function tests, gastrointestinal bleeding, haematemesis, jaundice, melaena, peptic ulceration with bleeding and/or perforation, non-peptic gastrointestinal ulceration, vomiting, ulcerative stomatitis, colitis, fatal hepatitis.

Renal: Glomerular nephritis, haematuria, interstitial nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, renal disease, renal papillary necrosis, renal failure.

Haematologic: Eosinophilia, granulocytopenia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia.

Central Nervous System: Depression, dream abnormalities, inability to concentrate, insomnia, malaise, myalgia, muscle weakness, aseptic meningitis.

Dermatologic: Porphyria cutanea tarda, alopecia, skin rashes, epidermal necrolysis, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, photosensitivity reactions including rare cases in which skin is resembling porphyria cutanea tarda or epidermolysis bullosa.

Special Senses: Hearing impairment.

Cardiovascular: Vasculitis, congestive heart failure.

General: Anaphylactoid reactions, menstrual disorders, pyrexia (chills and fever), eosinophilic pneumonitis."

Drowsiness an effect on coordination? Never....
post #22 of 22
& the Naprosyn product info
he following adverse events have been observed in clinical trials with standard Naprosyn tablets administered to patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

Incidence between 3% and 9%:
Gastrointestinal: The most frequent complaints reported related to the gastrointestinal tract. These were: constipation, heartburn, abdominal pain, nausea.
Central Nervous System: Headache, dizziness, drowsiness.
Dermatologic: Itching (pruritis), skin eruption, ecchymoses.
Special Senses: Tinnitus.
Cardiovascular: Oedema, dyspnoea.

Incidence between 1% and less than 3%:
Gastrointestinal: Dyspepsia, diarrhoea, stomatitis.
Central Nervous System: Lightheadedness, vertigo.
Dermatologic: Sweating, purpura.
Special Senses: Hearing disturbances, visual disturbances.
Cardiovascular: Palpitations.
General: Thirst.
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