EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Quiver expansion: SX:11 + what?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Quiver expansion: SX:11 + what?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I'm looking for some demo recommendations for this season. I'll probably expand my quiver during next season's post-model year price drop.

I have a new pair of 170 cm SX:11s. I demo'd them and the SX:9s last year and the 9 was a good all day ski for me and the 11s were challenging fun and they seemed to lift my game.

Here's the thing. I like to run Nastar and the 11s are hard to muscle through those gates. I'm also feeling a growing attraction for moguls and plan to spend some lesson time in the bumps. I know the 11s are the wrong ski for both of these things.

I'm a 5'9", 225# level 8 skier. What should I demo for a ski that will be friendlier in the bumps and gates? And though I am useless in ungroomed snow *now*, are there skis that fit the above criteria and that I could also use in the pow or is that another ski I'd need entirely?
post #2 of 24
my wisdom points to a big whole in your quiver that could be filled very well by a Völkl Explosiv. It has race construction, is awesome at speed, and turns on a dime..what a sec, that's not right.

Aw shucks, nevermind.

buy them anyway.

i'm no racer so i can't point to gate skis, but you might really enjoy the Völkl Supersport SixStar or FiveStar, though they are probably illegal for official gate bashing, and won't really expand your quiver, other than give you a ski that is better allround than the SX11.

gate bashing, bumps and crud alltogether is pretty hard to pinpoint.

my real recommendo then is one of the Völkl Supersports.
post #3 of 24
Actually, the SX:11 is an ideal NASTAR ski, as it is essentially the GS:11 with an "illegal" sidecut. Granted, it takes really sound technical skill to run through the gates, and you might be better served by a ski with a shorter turning radius.

A great pick would be the Atomic SL:11 in a 170 (+/-). The estra length will give you some stability, but the turning radius will be good for what you want to achieve, and the grip on hard snow will still be really, really good. The only caveat is that the ski may be too demanding, in which case the SL:9 might prove a better option.

Another good option is the Fischer RX 8 - again, a detuned racing ski with slalom heritage that won't kick you around too much.

The Völkl Supersport 6-Star is a great option, too, though it skis a bit "heavy" for me in the tighter turns.

Full disclosure: I ski the SX:11 in GS courses, tight and open. However, I'm a former FIS racer, so they feel almost like "cheater" boards, as their sidecut is 18 meters, vs. the 21+ meter sidecuts of FIS-legal skis.
post #4 of 24
You might also try the Atomic Metron:b5. While not a "gate basher", I think it's turn radius (11m in the 162) would let you carve most of the course. Its fat profile floats well. However, it's not going to be the best zipper-line bump ski. Should be nice for more relaxed bump technique (I haven't been able to try it there, yet).
post #5 of 24
I would recommend breaking into a more all mountain ski. If you are interested I would move to a twin tip type ski that has decent size under foot. Something like the Salomon 1080 I think would suit your purposes very well.

The 1080 is 80mm under foot i belive +/- 1mm. This will give you good performance in the crud and powder also the twin tip will serve you well in the bumps. And if you are feeling jiggy you get hit the park for some misty flips or maybe a Dinner Roll w/ Butter. This skis will still handel the grooms very well and will carve.

I think the SX-11 is an ideal ski for race type skiing. I wold stick with thouse and move over into the realm of all montain. I think you will like would you find.

Cheers!
post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 
I like the all-mountain advice. I wasn't sure why you were recommending twin-tips till you explained about moguls...makes sense.

Full disclosure: I never ran a get in my entire life till last season. I ran Nastar at three areas and Bronzed, Bronzed and Bornzed. Twice on SX:9s and once on SX:11s. My sense was that on a longer, fairly open course that wasn't too hard or rutted I was fine on the 11s. On a very short, tight course I'd be better on the 9s and probably get late and miss a gate on the 11s.

More full disclosure. I'm a cheap mother. I bought the SX:11s and 412 bindings new for under $500. I'm only interested in similar bargains for next off-season.
post #7 of 24
Demo the Dynastar Omecarve 9 @ 165. Gates and bumps, but not powder.

Since your one cheap mother you'll love them -- they are a real bargain.
post #8 of 24
If you are having a hard time turning a SX:11 in a NASTAR course, then those skis are just too much for you. Those skis should be perfect for the Gates.

If you are looking for something more versitil for all mountain and bumps, look for a softer wider ski. 70-78mm under the waist would be great. But If you having problems with the SX:11, buy something soft.
post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 
No problems with the SX:11s I love cruising on them. I just worry I'll never see a Nastar silver on them since they're built for arcing a bigger turn and depending on how the course is set I may have to muscle them into a smaller radius turn.
post #10 of 24
What are the sx-11's good for? going straight down the mountain on well groomed trial. I thought they were an all mountain ski? Am I wrong?
post #11 of 24
As others have mentioned the SX11 is esentially a GS race ski with a tighter radius (16m to 18m vs. 21 meter for FIS GS). Very good for tight medium radius turns. I use them as my race ski for Colorado TeamSki competition. Since TeamSki uses modified (tightened turns) GS courses they are perfect for that. My teammate won the TeamSki race at Copper Saturday on his SX11s. They should be a breeze on the easier NASTAR courses, if not you are not skiing them right. Don't even think of using them in moguls unless you are a true expert. You absolutely have to use a shoulder width stance and modern carving technique. You need to get way out on an edge and lay them over. I am 5'11", 165 lbs, and 48yrs old and ski on a 170mm SX11. I would not consider this an all mountain ski, mogul ski, or tree ski. They are great fun on cruisers though. If you use modern technique they are actually quite easy to ski. If you try and skid them you will be rudely reminded that they don't. I also found the SX11 to be more fun, a better turner, and easier to ski than the Volkl 6 Star.
post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 
Ok, so I should have no trouble running Nastar and I'm worrying about that for nothing...and as for the rest of what the SX:11s are good for...that's just exactly what I bought them for so great. No worries.

So my big issues are bumps (imminent) and deeper snow (some day...). So for a bump ski I should demo the following:

Fischer RX 8
Atomic Metron:b5 (relaxed technique, not zipper line...good in pow)
Salomon 1080
Dynastar Omecarve 9

Are these solid recommendations for my purpose?
post #13 of 24
Most people I know think the RX 8 is a little stiff for bumps and would recommend it's little brother, the RX 6. Same thing in the Dynastar line with the SkiCross 10 vs the SkiCross 9. The SC 9 would make a better bump ski than the SC 10 because it's a little softer.
post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 
post #15 of 24
No.
post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
ok...
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcahill
As others have mentioned the SX11 is esentially a GS race ski with a tighter radius (16m to 18m vs. 21 meter for FIS GS). Very good for tight medium radius turns. I use them as my race ski for Colorado TeamSki competition. Since TeamSki uses modified (tightened turns) GS courses they are perfect for that. My teammate won the TeamSki race at Copper Saturday on his SX11s. They should be a breeze on the easier NASTAR courses, if not you are not skiing them right. Don't even think of using them in moguls unless you are a true expert. You absolutely have to use a shoulder width stance and modern carving technique. You need to get way out on an edge and lay them over. I am 5'11", 165 lbs, and 48yrs old and ski on a 170mm SX11. I would not consider this an all mountain ski, mogul ski, or tree ski. They are great fun on cruisers though. If you use modern technique they are actually quite easy to ski. If you try and skid them you will be rudely reminded that they don't. I also found the SX11 to be more fun, a better turner, and easier to ski than the Volkl 6 Star.
RIGHT ON!
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
ok...
To be more precise: you don't want a competition mogul ski. You don't learn to drive in an F1 car. Skiing is no different. Take your time! Get a ski that you can have some fun on.

How about the Elan 555? Apparently last years M10 with fusion. I demo'd the M10. IMO, it should do everything you want to do, and you can leave the SX-11 at home. When I demo'd the M10 I found it to skid well, carves well but not as good as a dedicated carver, very stable, confidence inspiring reasonably wide (unlike a 1080), decent in most snow conditions, forgiving. IMO it was Elan's "best" ski even though the S8 carved better. The M10 is very versatile.

I would definately demo the S8 and the 555 for your purposes, and I'd lean towards the 555 for the Off-piste (someday).
post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
I see your point. Yet, I also don't like prepping vegetables with a swiss army knife. Are purpose built mogul skis really harder to ski in moguls or easier?

I found some Elan dealers in Aspen and will see about demo availability...

Thanks.
post #20 of 24
I asked the same question to a competition mogul skier. His response was:

"You can't learn moguls on moguls skiis. It'll hold you back."
post #21 of 24
Could you explain further? I am only so-so in the moguls, but I find lightweight skis with a soft shovel to work best. Something without too much sidecut. What does a competition mogul ski have that is different from other skis that makes it harder to learn moguls with? What makes an ideal mogul learning ski?
post #22 of 24
Competition mogul skis are designed for sking tight zipper lines at high speeds and aerial tricks. Not much actual turning is done. Most non-competitive mogul skiers ski a more relaxed line with more rounded turns. Most all-mountain skis will allow you to ski this type of line adequately. The softer the ski tip the easier time you will have. Avoid extreme side cuts like slalom skis and skier-cross type skis since they tend to hook up too much and not slide. I ski moguls (mostly at Mary Jane) with a pair of 4 year old K2 Axis-Xs and a 2 year old pair of Axis-XPs for powder days. Both are forgiving with a moderate flex. This years K2 Apache X would make a good mogul ski (softer than the old Axis-X). I demoed Rossi B1s and they work well also.
post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
Ok, how's this for my demo list for a multi-purpose ski with an emphasis on being a good mogul-learning ski:

Elan M555 168cm
Rossignol B1 170cm
K2 Apache X 167cm
Dynastar Skicross 9 170cm
Fischer RX 6 170cm
post #24 of 24
Should work.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Quiver expansion: SX:11 + what?