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Helmets w/speakers

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hi gang,
Can I get some feedback on the helmets with the built in headsets with hook ups for iPods and cell phones. Thinking specifically of the Giro Fuse and Nine but I know Red and some others also are in the market. Thanks.
post #2 of 18
Oh great! Now we're going to have people blabbing into invisible cell phones while they ski. :
post #3 of 18

Giro Fuse

I have this helmet. It definitely fits differently depending on which ear pads I have in: the ones with speakers fit much tighter than the ones without. In fact, it's too tight with the speakers, so I find them unuseable. Instead, I bought an extra set of ear pads w/o the speakers, and the helmet fits great with these.

Also, I find that in order to hear as much of the "mountain sounds" as I want, I have to keep the tunes very very low, which kind of defeats the purpose. In the final analysis, I prefer the more zen like state of silence in my helmet. Just me & the mountain & the kshhhh kshhhh kshhhh of my skis skidding round the turns ...
post #4 of 18
I do not have this helmet, but a good friend does. He and his wife really like using their Giros with their iPods while skiing. I did not experience any issues speaking with him while we were skiing, FWIW.
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Horse
Oh great! Now we're going to have people blabbing into invisible cell phones while they ski. :
Invisible? They are obvious and in wide use in lift lines in my experience so far this season.
post #6 of 18
I don't consider standing in a lift line to be skiing .
post #7 of 18
I just picked up a Giro nine.9 audio helmet and a set of Cobra PR385 radios, with hopes the radios would be compatible with the helmet's speakers and microphone. The speakers work, I can hear the radio though them...but unfortunately the microphone will not work. Also, the radio PTT button will not work when it is plugged into the helmet.
So, I can hear but not talk. Any suggestions? :::
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DBarnes727
So, I can hear but not talk. Any suggestions? :::
Sounds like you're a married man.
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
Nice Fox!
Darkhorse, don't worry I don't think that's coming. Personally would only want to use the iPod on long slow lifts.
Thanks for the feedback.
post #10 of 18
I used to have a Cobra and their own plug-in earbud thing. It has a "line lump" with a mic and a PTT button. When you plug into the jack, it disables the mic and PTT button on the radio itself.

If you are handy, you could try this:
- Get the Cobra earbud.
- Clip the line between the earbud and mic/PTT button lump.
- Solder on a jack of the appropriate type to the Cobra earbud line (i.e. one that matches the plug at the end of the line coming out of the helmet).

There are a some issues and risks involved.
- If the impedance of the Giro speakers is much higher than that of the Cobra earbud, you may not be able to get enough volume to hear. But this problem should've presented itself with what you've already done.
- If the helmet is wired for stereo, you'll have to know how to wire it. A stereo plug is called a TRS (for tip-ring-sleeve): if you look at it, there is a pointy metal tip (tip), then a plastic insulator, then a bit of metal (ring), then another plastic insulator, than the rest of the shaft of the plug (sleeve). Usually, the tip is left speaker hot, the ring is right speaker hot, and the sleeve is common ground. You can connect it so you hear the walkie-talkie in one ear or both by wiring one wire in the Cobra earbud cable to tip and ring and the other to sleeve. The speakers in the helmet should work even if they're hooked up "backwards."
- When you plug the cord from the helmet into the jack on the Cobra, do you only hear in one ear (probably the left)? That would make sense if the Cobra has a standard mono (tip-sleeve) jack, and the helmet has a stereo (TRS) plug. The ring isn't contacting anything. This could also happen if the Cobra has a TRS plug, but uses the ring contact for the microphone input. I don't think Cobra's are wired that way, though. At least mine had two separate jacks, and the earbud unit had a plastic connector with two plugs.
- If there are more than two wires in the cord between the line-lump and earbud, when you cut it you may have screwed it up in a way that's not obvious to fix.
post #11 of 18
I have a Giro Fuse helmet with the tune-ups earphones. Helmet fits great, speakers sound good, ears stay warm. No complaints. I only turn the music up real loud when I am hiking or skiing by myself. Usually turn it down or off when riding lifts because it's usually interesting to talk to the other people on the lift. (And, they might offer a smoke).
post #12 of 18
On the whole subject of speakers in ears:

Those with long memories may remember the "Astral Tune," which was a big tape player that predated the Walkman, and was actually marketed to skiers. I used one exactly once. It totally disrupted my rhythm. Hated it. Never tried anything similar since.

As for headphones connected to a radio: seems like a good idea to me. Not so much because you're going to be talking on it all the time, but it's a way to monitor a channel that's in fact less disturbing to others. The alternative is to have the radio in your chest pocket or somewhere, broadcasting and squawking to everyone near you.

I like using a radio. Not to chat on, but to locate and meet up with people. I might not use it for a total of more than two minutes in a day, but those two minutes are awfully helpful.
post #13 of 18
don't forget the rather simpler and cheaper alternative -- earbud headphones.

I have some Koss model that sounds nice with my .mp3 player, and Sony makes a really good one for about $35, and if you want to go whole-hog yuppie audiophile the Etymotic top model is something like $300...

I use mine with my .mp3 inside my Boeri Shorty Air helmet, sound is nice.

in other words, you don't have to get a new helmet...
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Invisible? They are obvious and in wide use in lift lines in my experience so far this season.
your location may have something to do with that
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
don't forget the rather simpler and cheaper alternative -- earbud headphones.
I've tried earbuds and I can never get them to fit quite right, they are always pulling out. Plus, I think they drop ambient noise down too much. I vote for the SkullCandy that comes with Giro's -- that's what I'm planning to buy. I bought a pair of stand-alones last year, and they worked great. Very occasionaly I have to answer my cell phone and it take about 30 second to remove all my assorted gear.

With the SkullCandys you just hit a button. Anyway, as I say they worked great until I decided to make it a project to dissasemble them and build my own in helmet headphones. Consequences were, well...predicatable.
post #16 of 18
I have a couple of pairs of Sony earbuds. Earbuds are the only thing I can use comfortably and Sony packs all theirs with three different sizes of rubber flanges for them.

I lust after more expensive Shures or Etymotics but I haven't rationalized the expense...*yet*.
post #17 of 18
my Koss buds have very pliable foam rubber for the ear opening, you sorta mash them in the same way you install those foam rubber hearing protectors that you get at the shooting range.

the model is "The Plug" and the Koss site says they're only $16. The Plug
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston
- If there are more than two wires in the cord between the line-lump and earbud, when you cut it you may have screwed it up in a way that's not obvious to fix.
There are two wires between the lump and the earbud. One is copper colored the other is green. Could I just splice those two wires to the Giro wire between the helmet connection and the mic lump... and be able to receive transmissions through the helmet speakers? Then just use the cobra 'lump' microphone and button to transmit?

I'm not sure about the impedance of the earbud or giro speakers, but I could hear the radio in the helmet speakers when I plugged the Giro jack into the radio. I just could not transmit with either the mic button or the radio itself.

I have also tried Motorola, Midland and Uniden radios....all with the same result. I could hear but not talk. (with the Uniden radio, the Giro jack has to be pulled out one click after being fuly inserted, in order to hear sound)

Geez, you'd think Giro would make these things more compatible with radios. Who the hell wants to use a cell phone on the mountain? I don't think I've had much luck getting any reception up North. I will call Giro tomorrow and see what they have to say about it. But in the meantime, it seems like you may be just the person who can help me, sjjohnston.
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