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Cheap Spyder Jackets from China on Ebay (is this Legit)

post #1 of 36
Thread Starter 
I've seen a huge number of what are supposedly real Spyder ski jackets made out of gore-tex on Ebay. They are selling for something like $50, and are sent from China. (There are also some North Face Jackets). See: http://stores.ebay.com/QINGPAI_W0QQsspagenameZl2QQtZkm

This deal seems too good to be true. I assumed these are totally fake, however, when I emailed the seller (in Shanghai), he responded in broken english that they were 1) real, 2) made of gore-tex, and 3) sized the same as the models sold in the U.S.

Does anyone have any idea if this stuff is Legit or if these are just worthless knock offs. (Based on the feedback I've seen on Eba, about 95% of buyers gave positive feedback, while a handful said they were "knock offs." Three or four people complained of stains or shipping problems).

The guy who I emailed, said he would send me a gore-tex jacket and pants for $120.

Anyway, I'd be interested to hear if any of you know anything about this.

Thanks,

RPG

PS> Please, no responses telling me that gullible isn't in the dictionary or that there is a certain bridge fore sale in Brooklyn
post #2 of 36
There's a good chance that they are 'gray market' knockoffs. China, while home to tons of factories, is also the rip-off capital of the world when it comes to illegally duplicating products. Chances are that while the garment looks the same, it's lacking some key features like seam taping or something. Buyer beware.
post #3 of 36
Nah. Rant warning. These eBay Spyders/TNFs are identical to the NYC chinatown TNF/dvds/rolexes/etc. Being knock off material isn't the worst part, but the conditions these items are produced under. Don't support it. End of rant. Save your cash for the real thing.
post #4 of 36
How much clothing & outerwear ISN"T made under sweat shop conditions? Just look at the tags on what you wear. Most of it will be made by borderline slave labor.

(not that I'm supporting this quality controlless gray market stuff)
post #5 of 36
I agree with gotamagel, buyer beware. I travel to China for work and have first hand experience with "gray" market goods. Many companies in many different types of industries moved manufacturing to China, especially in the US (K2, for instance). In a lot of cases, the molds, dies, machinery, etc. are the exact same used to produce legal product for the parent company except that the product is made outside of official work hours. In these cases, the illegal product is identical to the real thing (because it is made by machines that make the real thing). They could also be seconds from the contracted Chinese company, but are being sold illegally as official product. In other cases, the blueprints are duplicated by a plant manager's brother-in-law. Counterfeiting in China has moved beyond cheap knock-offs with hilarious misspellings.

The trouble is you don't know. I would be suspicious about such goods on ebay. You can give it a try but expect it is a "fake". In my experience, the best way to find identical but illegal goods is to have a contact or know someone.
post #6 of 36
I would say there is a pretty good chance they are legit. My dad got a Northface jacket on a trip to China for about that price. I'm convinced it's the real thing. Remember, a lot of the products are made there. I'm also fairly sure that these jackets have "made their way out of the factory". Good way of suplementing an income. If you don't care about the morals, I would say it's a great price for what is probably the real thing.
post #7 of 36
I have bought bicycle gear (American Classic road hubs) from a guy who was assoicated with the Chinese production factory (there is alot of high-end bicycle gear coming from China these days, especially carbon goods). The hubs were way below wholesale and cosmetic seconds, but otherwise just fine.

With that said, I would much rather spend money on made in the 1st-world products. But, it isn't always possible anymore. My road frame came from Italy, my helmet is Belgian, but I couldn't afford to throw down $480 for a set of Campy Carbon cranks, so I opted for the FSA carbon cranks ($190). They were made in China, but price dictated that I couldn't afford the made-in-Italy product. Not that I don't try.
post #8 of 36
I would have to say that they are fakes. As others have said China is the Counterfit good s Capital of the world. Even the Close look at the Photos It looks like a very cheap matrial being used. With that said they do say they accept Paypal so you can get your money back if the product is less then what you except.
post #9 of 36

ebay 101

The first thing I look at in an ebay auction is the location of the seller. Hmm... Shanghai... Do I want to deal with a third world country? That would be enough to put me off, but, if not, the next step is to check the feedback. Low feedback is another poor sign, and negative feedback should be checked. Lots of complaints about red stains. Another check is to ask yourself whether the deal sounds too good to be true. There are guys selling seven thousand dollar cameras for $1500, wanting to get paid with unrefundable methods like Western Union. Just kiss your money goodbye. I've even seen them hijack someone's identity (and feedback).
Don't forget, shipping from overseas can be expensive. :
post #10 of 36
They accept paypal. This is how it's written:
I accept payapl ONLY!!

Never used payapl before : :

I bought a black iron pot/burner last year (made in china) which was a copy of a locally made pot.

They must have bought an authentic & made a mold since the original read "kajun kooker", and theirs read "rekook nujak", but with the letters backward. : :

In this case, the old saying, "You get what you pay for" , surely aplies.
post #11 of 36
If it seems too good to be true, it most likely is (too good to be true). So, don't let your desire for either a good deal or a nice ski jacket separate you from your perfectly good cash.

<soapbox on> As an asside, I must disagree with those who constantly bemoan the deplorable working conditions in overseas labor markets. While I don't agree with the labor practices, I cannot agree with the notion that "we shouldn't buy things made by laborers laboring in those conditions." If we put them out of business, then the laborers would--obviously--have zero income. Our willingness to buy product is likely the only keeping many families fed around the world. If there is a problem, it is with their corrupt practices and not our consumerism. <soapbox off>
post #12 of 36
Fake. Just like all the fake golf shoes on ebay that are too good to be true. Guys buy them, they literally leak, rip and fall apart in weeks.
post #13 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Horse
The first thing I look at in an ebay auction is the location of the seller. Hmm... Shanghai... Do I want to deal with a third world country? :
Well Shanghai is actually not a country. It's a city in eastern China and it's about as third world as New York. There's obviously a risk involved, but that's what you get for buying at such low costs. The real Spyder jackets are made China BTW.

-T
post #14 of 36

Shanghaied!!

Thanks for the gegraphy lesson, real9999, I assumed everybody here knew where Shanghai was located. I just hope nobody gets Shanghaied. I will let those who are unfamiliar with the expression google it themselves.
post #15 of 36
Sorry, I think most of us are familiar with the expression. But you didn't use it in that context. Your intended meaning aside, the point was that China is hardly a third world country. That was all.

-T
post #16 of 36
I got a "North Face" jacket along with three other people I know as a Christmas present two years ago. It was direct from China via an airline employee. I found out later that she payed $50 each for them. I lucked out on the gift because mine is still OK (waterproof and warm) and I use it all of the time in the mountains. The others didn't fare so well, however. They have had problems with zippers breaking and they're not in use any more. A 25% success rate is not good.
post #17 of 36
I have bought some patagonia gloves from ebay from China, looks, and feels identical to the $120 ones in the local store $30 to my door
post #18 of 36

It's a gamble...

I bought a Northface jacket over ebay from China a few months ago. The seams were taped, but the rest of the quality was very poor. Returning it to the seller was the most difficult thing. It has been "lost" by the post office for the past month, so I haven't even been refunded yet. Three things I suggest... go to the actual spyder website and compare the two products by picture. Also, contact the seller before you bid, asking for authenticity confirmation, where the got the product, and if you are unsatisfied with the product you can send it back and receive a refund. It's a gamble buying anything on ebay, but particularly too good to be prices from China.
post #19 of 36
I think we need a loyal Epic member to buy the Spyder jacket and let us all know if it was a good deal. Go ahead, it ain't my money your spending. Me, I'll spend my money on the real thing form a local shop or a mail order like Campmor or Sierra Trading Post. People I have delt with and trust.
post #20 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by TOLOCOMan
I would say there is a pretty good chance they are legit. My dad got a Northface jacket on a trip to China for about that price. I'm convinced it's the real thing. Remember, a lot of the products are made there. I'm also fairly sure that these jackets have "made their way out of the factory". Good way of suplementing an income. If you don't care about the morals, I would say it's a great price for what is probably the real thing.
I am fairly sure gurantee its an illegal knock off. But its also probably indistinguisable from the real thing. Most modern knock offs are identical to the real thing and made on the same machines as the real thing by people who actually make the real thing. However they aren't put through the Quality processes that real products are. So you don't know what you are getting.
post #21 of 36
Spyder is also dumping jackets, pants and many other items on other discount dotcom outlets such as Sierra Trading Post, Campmore and a few others, so I would say they are probably legit. They may be very overstocked or in trouble, who knows.
As far as sweatshops, almost every major sporting goods clothing line and shoes and even equipment, are made overseas, mainly low labor cost places like Bangledesh, VietNam, Tiawan, ETC. For example, a $200 baseball glove can be made for less than $10. Who gets rich? You know the answer to that.

People are brand name fanatics. I used to be but got wise. I used to buy Oakley glasses when they were reasonable but now go for as much as $200. For what? The name? The best pair of sunglasses I've had in the past five years, I got at Wallmart for $16.50 Foster Grants with polarized lenses.

Most times we do get what we pay for. And if you can get a North Face jacket for $50, go for it.
post #22 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerpaw
...but the conditions these items are produced under. Don't support it. End of rant. Save your cash for the real thing.
Err, as if the "real thing" is being produced by union labor under OSHA supervision?

What the heck is the difference?
-Garrett
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by rpg
This deal seems too good to be true. I assumed these are totally fake, however, when I emailed the seller (in Shanghai), he responded in broken english that they were 1) real, 2) made of gore-tex, and 3) sized the same as the models sold in the U.S.
[quote=EBAY]Sorry, this store has been closed. [/ebay]

I think this pretty much sums it up! 8)>
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by pheft
I got a "North Face" jacket along with three other people I know as a Christmas present two years ago. It was direct from China via an airline employee. I found out later that she payed $50 each for them. I lucked out on the gift because mine is still OK (waterproof and warm) and I use it all of the time in the mountains. The others didn't fare so well, however. They have had problems with zippers breaking and they're not in use any more. A 25% success rate is not good.
I bought a "NorthFace" jacket from the army surplus store for $40.00. I couldn't resist; my old Eddy Bauer down-filled Jacket was worn through at the cuffs, and I needed a warm jacket.

It turned out to really be a three-season jacket. You could wear it for one winter, after which my guess is that it would have nough down and feathers left for a spring jacket, and then it might have made a nice light summer jacket. I gave it to the Sally Ann during a cold snap last winter, and bought a real winter coat and a ski jacket.
post #25 of 36

Do we get what we pay for?

I think the big truth here is, it's very hard to tell. There is much chance them being fake as being legitimate. If we go with popular decision were likely to make it what customers feed back is.
The unfortunate truth is that, unless each member has rigorously tested the product they bought for authenticity,blemishes, est. and made sure their findings were 100% accurate, it would only make one sure of that particular purchase and perhaps reflect on the seller's honesty.
Unless one is very good at investigating these matters to the fullest, we are largely confined to making truths based on; what's popular, how much I trust my judgment system(some times very faulty), what a complete stranger thinks and how much we can trust someone that we don't really know.
I think these are mostly bad methods of judgment and one, although maybe lucky for a while, is at risk of flat out fraud and deception(thieves selling stolen property, con artist trying to make a buck, irresponsible people, est.) of what they buy, when they buy on a hunch, instead of buying from those who have endured the test of time and are proven.
The old saying goes, you usually get what you pay for and I think there may be some truth to that. So good question,"Are these Spyder jackets legitimate"? The most honest answer I can give you is,"I don't know" if you find someone who does they are probably capable of making a lot of money for there expertise.
Thank You
post #26 of 36
I'll keep it brief:

These are STOLEN GOODS.

Theft of intellectual property.
Theft of design.
Theft of a companys good name.
Theft of the manufacturing facility.

There is NO other reasonable way of looking at this. Do what you feel is right.
post #27 of 36
Buyer beware... If it's not from an authorized Spyder dealer, then it's likely to be a knock-off of inferior quality. I've been burned in the past on a flea-bay Spyder jacket before. It came with all the tags, etc.. and appeared to be authentic. After the 1st season the jacket started to fall apart. The fabric was not waterproof, color was fading after being soaked a few times, material was coming apart at seams... The only plus was that I didn't pay much for it & I did get about 2 seasons out of it.

I've heard of Spyder, Mountain Hardware, North Face knockoffs appearing on flea-bay. Don't be fooled!
post #28 of 36
RPG : It's BOGUS --repeat BOGUS

if it sounds too good to be true --IT IS !!
post #29 of 36
Sumer is boring. How many other 18 month old threads can we resurect?

Quote:
These are STOLEN GOODS.

Theft of intellectual property.
Theft of design.
Theft of a companys good name.
Theft of the manufacturing facility.
I support Americna Companies, Multinationals, not so much. It is interesting that according to you morality, legal factors, etc... should be a high priority to the consumer when making buying decisions as opposed to buying simply on economic factors. As a manufacturer, if you really want IP security you will manufacture in a contry that supports that. Multinationals are not innocent victims here, they knew what they were getting into. I simply wish to point out the hypocrisy and poor judgement of the multinationals who thought that manufacturing driven by cheap labor in the wild, wild east was such a great idea.
post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
Sumer is boring. How many other 18 month old threads can we resurect?



I support Americna Companies, Multinationals, not so much. It is interesting that according to you morality, legal factors, etc... should be a high priority to the consumer when making buying decisions as opposed to buying simply on economic factors. As a manufacturer, if you really want IP security you will manufacture in a contry that supports that. Multinationals are not innocent victims here, they knew what they were getting into. I simply wish to point out the hypocrisy and poor judgement of the multinationals who thought that manufacturing driven by cheap labor in the wild, wild east was such a great idea.
So what brand of skis do you own?
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