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Downhill boots for W-I-D-E feet

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I'm an intermediate\adv. int. skier in the market for some new boots. I've never really had a pair of boots that didn't hurt, but a lot of that is probably due to my "there's no such thing as too tight" attitude. I can't stand any bit of movement within the boot-period....I'm just too sloppy on the skis if there is.

Any thoughts?

Thanks

p.s. Great forum---I can't believe how hard it is to find reviews of ski gear online!!!
post #2 of 28
Technica probably has what you're looking for. The only way to find out is to go to a dedicated ski shop and try them on- you wont find a good fitting boot just by asking online, especially if you've had problems with fit before.
post #3 of 28
I wide try the Rival line from Tecnica. The boots are designed for wider feet yet they are still decently designed for performnace i the higher levels.


I have been fitting boots for 5 seasons and when I see a foot like Fred Flinstones I go for the Rival serires by Tecnica.

Cheers!
post #4 of 28
I had the same problem. Kept going back to Nordica but always was in pain, though I couldn't find anything else to remotely fit me until I tried on a pair of Dolomite Sintesi 8.5's. They have a lot of forefoot volume and I can now ski until lunch with no pain. I have to unbuckle them at lunch to give my feet a breather, but that's it. I feel like I've gone to heaven. No more daggers in my feet at 2:00.

I gotta brag. When I first looked at them I was short of funds and they were $600. I didn't buy. Went back through the store a year and a half later and found them still there on the bargain rack for $140. I was looking for a snorkle and fins for a Hawaii trip but walked out with ski boots. First things first.
post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the feedback. Your comments are consistent with what I received while looking around the ski gear "warehouses".

I suppose that the question now becomes Diable Fire, Diablo Flame, Rival RX, Rival X9, Icon DP or Icon race. I guess it's time to hit the fitting shop.

I have myself about 90% convinced that I'm going with a hot form---is there any reason not to?
post #6 of 28
I feel your pain! Literally. I have size 12 EEE(E) feet and have the same troubles with burning pain, numbness, cramps etc. This year went to the Technica Rival RX boot with an orthotic and I am in heaven. Can't believe the difference. Anyway there is hope, and the expertise on these boards will help get you there.

Good Luck,
Doug
post #7 of 28
For something stiffer, and more competitive, try Lange MF. I have 10 EEE and fit wonderfully in Lnage Comp. 130 MF 9.5
post #8 of 28
Echoing the advice of others, the best thing you can do is go to a good store (with a good bootfitter), and try on as many different boots as you can. Then, once you find the best fitting one, get a pair of custom footbeds. This will make it far more comfortable for you to wear the boot for long periods of time, and it should also help eliminate any movement within the boot that you mentioned.
post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 
Would you prefer custom footbeds over "Hot form" (or is hot form just one type of custom footbed)?
post #10 of 28
Hot Form is Technica's way of moulding the whole liner to your foot. Custom footbeds are just the insoles (part under your feet). Both should help with the fit of the boot (although I don't really know that much about Hot Form, never had a pair of hot form boots).
post #11 of 28
13EE here...

I ended up with Rival X9 (ULV? big shell basically) in a 30.0.

Not the stiffest boot out there, but it sure is more comfortable...
post #12 of 28
For absurdly wide feet Strolz can make one to fit. They cost a fortune. http://www.strolz.at/english/schuheflash.swf

My bootfitter said he can blow out a boot six inches wide, so he can't see the reason to go to Strolz. My sister has a pair and they do fit, but are much heavier and stiffer than she would like. Nice leather liners though.
post #13 of 28
If you are looking for a custom boot there is only one boot Maker in the Us and that is Daleboot of Salt Lake City. He makes boot for people with all kids of foot and fitting problems. I know of a few people who were about to give up on skiing becuse thier feet hurt so bad. That is untill they found Dale Boot. They really don't cost any more then an high end boot out there.
post #14 of 28
I have daleboots (had them adjusted three times and blown out) and still have pain. I'm now looking at custom footbeds. Today's boots are much more customizable than they were 4-5 years ago- so I wouldn't give up on them just yet. I would look for a good bootfitter who can figure out if width alone is the problem or if there are other factors contributing to the pain - and who offers a fit guarantee. (and don't trust anyone who tells you that the liners will just pack out and everything will then be fine!)

[BTW, I Live in NY and emailed Jeff Rich from the masterfit website a few weeks ago, but he still hasn't gotten back to me. If anyone knows of a better way to get in touch with him, please let me know]
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SKEEMEISTER
I wide try the Rival line from Tecnica. The boots are designed for wider feet yet they are still decently designed for performnace i the higher levels.


I have been fitting boots for 5 seasons and when I see a foot like Fred Flinstones I go for the Rival serires by Tecnica.

Cheers!
Tecnica Rival RX HVL (high volume last). I have fit 2-4E wide feet in these without modifications.
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimeral
Tecnica Rival RX HVL (high volume last). I have fit 2-4E wide feet in these without modifications.
I've contacted several shops with the same issue,
and this is the boot they recommended first.
"Rival RX HVL"
post #17 of 28
nordica's are great if the technica's aren't wide enough. I know that the technica's I tried on weren't, but the nordica's were just right.
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick
I have daleboots (had them adjusted three times and blown out) and still have pain. I'm now looking at custom footbeds. Today's boots are much more customizable than they were 4-5 years ago- so I wouldn't give up on them just yet. I would look for a good bootfitter who can figure out if width alone is the problem or if there are other factors contributing to the pain - and who offers a fit guarantee. (and don't trust anyone who tells you that the liners will just pack out and everything will then be fine!)
Fit guarantees are critical.

Not just that, but you have to find someone willing to spend the TIME, rather than just say "sorry they didn't work, here is your refund."

The difference between a widened boot and a out-of-box boot can be absolutely massive.

If it really is a width issue, the footbed probably won't make it go away magically.
post #19 of 28
like others have said,

a good bootfitter is the only place to go.

people's positive reactions with Tecnica's Rival boot does speak volumes about their comfort level for people with high volume feet. and they are still super awesome performing boots!

get an insole made, too.

if you end up with the tecnica, there is no reason not to get the hot form liner: it will only improve the fit even more, and may allow you to get into a smaller shell (if you're on the line between shell sizes)!
post #20 of 28
A custom made boot sounds like the only way to go, it will cost probably 100 to have the shell blown out and custom footbeds is a good idea if you want to get to the advanced level. They can fit any boot type to any foot its just a matter of the technicians skill, alot of us ski team members have skii boots 3-4 sizes smaller than their street shoe. My technician always says "i can always go bigger, but once it gets too big your screwed" also the hot foam custom liners are more of a gimick, your liners are going to pack out if your an avid skiier they will feel like a true custom fit for a year if your lucky, the plastic shell won't change.
post #21 of 28
Custom footbeds for most is less an issue of getting to advanced level and more about comfort and control. If you would rather ski effortlessly without pain instead of with a lot of effort and a heck of a lot of pain, footbeds are the way to go. Your feet were not created to be encased - virtually immobilized and then stressed by g-forces for hours on end. A footbed can alleviate the problems that such unnatural pressure on your feet will cause.

Anyway, What exactly do you think a "custom" boot is beyond a a correctly fitted and alligned shell and a thermally molded liner? This is exactly what can be achieved with todays non "custom" boots.

Also, the vagaries of how your liner packs out will depend on a number of factors, but I have heard to many idiot bootfitters tell me that after a few months the pain will simply dissapear because the liner will pack out. This is nonsense. If it hurts in the store, it will hurt on the top of the slope - and hurt really badly by the time you get to the bottom.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by unionbowler
if you end up with the tecnica, there is no reason not to get the hot form liner: it will only improve the fit even more, and may allow you to get into a smaller shell (if you're on the line between shell sizes)!
For people with seriously wide fit, this will be a big waste of money when I heat it way past the design temperature, and stretch it with implements of destruction.

edit: actually, worse than that. The HF liners are stiffer, and more difficult to get to stretch without damaging them. So it could actually be a hindrance. Only in pretty extreme scenarios though.
post #23 of 28
Widest boot I've found, the only one wide enough for my feet, is the new atomic B9 Widebody. They are very wide in the front, and small around the heel and ankle. The toe box is actually square. The small ankle/heel stops a lot of the foot movement you get with other wide boots.
post #24 of 28

Measure your foot width (wearing the liner) while standing up. Add 2x boot plastic thickness. Get the boot fitter to blow your boots out to that outside width.

I've yet to have a boot tech actually measure my foot width, it's nuts.

 

If you have a high arch, consider getting a 3/4 relief orthotic, just supports the heel and arch. Turned my boots from hellish to ski all day in comfort.

 

 

GREY
post #25 of 28

New world record - reviving an 11.5 yo thread.

post #26 of 28

I know.  Funny.  There ought to be an award.

 

Reminds me of myself when I first started posting here — none of the now-obvious signs (e.g. posting dates) were obvious to me then.

post #27 of 28
Or the fact that none of the poster names are familiar or on-line...tongue.gif
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducklets View Post
 

Measure your foot width (wearing the liner) while standing up. Add 2x boot plastic thickness. Get the boot fitter to blow your boots out to that outside width.

I've yet to have a boot tech actually measure my foot width, it's nuts.

 

If you have a high arch, consider getting a 3/4 relief orthotic, just supports the heel and arch. Turned my boots from hellish to ski all day in comfort.

 

 

GREY


Hello there!  Thanks for trying to help.  If you haven't found it yet, the posting date/time is in the top left corner.

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