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Help with short turns

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Some help would be nice in short turns, the steering move before the tipping to be changed. I see a lot of this in both instructors and public and a proper perscription for change would be helpfull!
post #2 of 5
Iwren,

Roll the Sole

In ski boots feel yourself roll from the big toe edge of the foot to the little toe edge of the foot. Feel the pressure move across the sole of your foot from one side to the other. You are trying to move the foot inside the boot. Do this with both feet.

On easy terrain from a straight run roll the sole of one foot and feel what happens. Roll the sole of the other foot and feel the effect. Repeat. The sensation that you are going for here is the clean arcing engagement of the inside ski with no slippage. When you can feel the clean engagement of the new inside ski you can use further tipping of the foot or add in a pointing the foot feel, to shape the turn.

On steeper terrain. From a traverse roll the sole. Blend further tipping and pointing into the turn more actively than you did on the easier slope. When you feel the pressure begin to build in the second half of the turn don't resist it, let it begin to push your feet up under your body as and roll the sole for the next turn. The more actively you feel the tipping and pointing the shorter your turn will be, the more the blend of pointing and tipping leans to the pointing feel the tighter your turn will be.

Never, and I repeat, never push on your skis.

Hope this helps,

yd
post #3 of 5
The standard progression for short turns include lots of sideslipping drills:
Sideslips to an edge set
Falling leaves
Pivot slips
Sideslips with some forward pressure to allow your skis to find the fall line
Sideslips with some uphill leg extension to allow your skis to find the fall line
Sideslips steering through the fall line
Sideslips steering through the fall line with a pole touch.

The reason for all the sideslips is that it helps you find the center of your skis. You may do pretty good long radius carved turns even if you are a little in the backseat, but you need to get to he front of your skis to do short radius turns.
Once you can steer a round, skidded short radius turn, you can add a little edge early in the turn. The earlier you engage your edges, the more speed control you will find at the top of the turn. A late and/or abrupt edge engagement often results in chatter, which is slower than skidding.
Short radius turns generally require some kind of skidding and steering. Even though a modern SL ski will carve a real short radius, that's really more like a GS turn than a short radius turn on a longer ski.

Hope this helps,

John
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdowling
The standard progression for short turns include lots of sideslipping drills:
Sideslips to an edge set
Falling leaves
Pivot slips
Sideslips with some forward pressure to allow your skis to find the fall line
Sideslips with some uphill leg extension to allow your skis to find the fall line
Sideslips steering through the fall line
Sideslips steering through the fall line with a pole touch.

The reason for all the sideslips is that it helps you find the center of your skis. You may do pretty good long radius carved turns even if you are a little in the backseat, but you need to get to he front of your skis to do short radius turns.
Once you can steer a round, skidded short radius turn, you can add a little edge early in the turn. The earlier you engage your edges, the more speed control you will find at the top of the turn. A late and/or abrupt edge engagement often results in chatter, which is slower than skidding.
Short radius turns generally require some kind of skidding and steering. Even though a modern SL ski will carve a real short radius, that's really more like a GS turn than a short radius turn on a longer ski.

Hope this helps,

John
oooooo - I never got to do any of those.... I just skied shorter & shorter turns..... & lots of snowplough wedel somewhere in there....
post #5 of 5
Try to discover how you need to move to change edges without changing direction.

Hint: Release CM from legs first, follow thru with the feet

Try it fix it, try it fix it, until you get it,
If you need help, go where you need to to get it.
A worthwhile endevor. ;-)
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