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Kinesiology

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I am preparing for the level III exam this year and I really want to focus my studies this season on the kinesiology behind what we do. While Bob Barnes ' Encyclopedia is great, it doesn't go into much depth about physical aspects of why we do what we do. Does anyone know of a basic manual or crash course guide to kinesiology that would be helpful in this circumstance. Furthermore, for all of you level III, trainers, and examiners; do you think that this is a appropriate focus?
post #2 of 18
Calais' classic, the Anatomy of Movement is still the best:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...89737?v=glance

If you order through Amazon, please support this site by using the Epicski Amazon Link.
Thanks!
post #3 of 18
Do a search on "mechanics of posture and human locomotion". the information out there is endless. Understanding and applying it to skiing is another story. Keep an open mind and think both creatively and criticaly, and approach the subject from a human perspective first and then a skiing perspective. Meaning find an understanding of what the body requires for balance in movment and tasks in movement and the systems it employs and then look for understanding on how this applies to skiing. Enjoy the journey. Later, RicB.
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powder8
I am preparing for the level III exam this year and I really want to focus my studies this season on the kinesiology behind what we do. While Bob Barnes ' Encyclopedia is great, it doesn't go into much depth about physical aspects of why we do what we do. Does anyone know of a basic manual or crash course guide to kinesiology that would be helpful in this circumstance. Furthermore, for all of you level III, trainers, and examiners; do you think that this is a appropriate focus?
I am not sure about this approach. While understanding the kinesiology is Ok, I don't think I would make it the focus of my studies to pass a level III exam.

This approach may make you overly technical and more narrowly focused. A better approach might be to concentrate on nailing a students problem with movements analysis and then reducing your answer to the student in as few a words as possible all kept within the framework of ATS.

I guess I am saying that in the workup to the level III exam, I would be more concerned with my teaching in the most concise and simplest way possible. I would think along the lines of core concepts and stepping stones vs how everything works. Save that for the learning after the exam. You can easily lose the forest for the tree with your approach.

This is just my opinion and no one elses.
post #5 of 18
Pierre I agree with your advice on being carefull about what and how he studies specificaly for the exam. However "Movement Analysis" is "Applied Kinesiology".
post #6 of 18
I agree with Pierre on this one, although I'm not, nor do i claim to be an instructor. It is however a very interesting topic. A skier who is quite skilled may understand how to ski, and the movements to make, whether they have been taught or just learned them naturally, but ideally you should understand why you make the movements that you do. I suspect that with most skiers that are making correct movements whent hey ski - it is either a learned movement, or a subconcious movement... but rarely does someone know exactly why they are moving the way they are, and if it is actually urting them or helping them in terms of their skiing.
I'd like to hear some of the instruction guru's thoughts on this one.
Later
GREG
post #7 of 18
That's why I reccommend the Calais book. It's really written for dancer and athletes, as opposed to technicians.
post #8 of 18
My post was meant only as a caution for passing an exam. I really did not understand the kinesiology about skiing to a high degree until after the exam. That is when the real learning can begin and your mind can wander all over the place without fear of losing sight of the goal.

I agree with Rick. Movements analysis is applied kinesiology but I think to pass the level III the examiners are more looking for your use of it and how you convey it in your teaching. I know they are not looking for how well you can pick everything appart. A true focus on kinesiology is more appropriate for after passing the level III exam. Its more at the examiner level.
post #9 of 18
I would avoid studying any kind of general or theoretical kinesthesiology, especially if I did not already have a good backgroud in that kind of study. Stick with movement analysis materials from PSIA, such as the "Alpine Movement Assessment Pocket Guide." It's important in L3 exams to use the same definitions of terms as the Examiners, and working from the PSIA materials helps you do that. I found the emphasis at the exam was on simple and practical descriptions, in terms that the public would understand and apply, rather than on in-depth theoretical knowledge.

Good luck,

John
post #10 of 18
Powder 8, talk to Bob Barnes. His wife told me that there is an informal Movement analysis session on Tuesday nights somewhere in Silverthorne. May be a bit of a drive, but worth checking out.
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
thank you, everyone for your posts...

i probably will look into the kinesiology aspect of skiing, but i will not make a huge focus. i would like to find out more about those MA meetings in silverthorne. would anyone know a good way to get in touch with people that attend those meetings...
post #12 of 18
Send a PM to Bob Barnes, and hope that his mailbox is not full!
post #13 of 18
Powder8,

Or PM me-I'll get you the directions. We generally start about 7 in the evening (Tuesday) and go to about 9 to 9:30. Usually we stay in one location just off exit 205 (Silverthorne/Dillon)-occassionally we'll change locations but somewhere very nearby.

Don't think Bob is going to be there next week but we have a very able group of trainers who run the show in his absence.

Edit-oops, week only has 2 "e's"
post #14 of 18
I've been biting my tongue long enough. I think it is going to bleed.

Pierre hit the nail on the head. Einstein has a great quote about making things as simple as possible, but not simpler. Skip the study of Kinesiology

C.S. Lewis said, "No one can teach riding as well as a horse"

The very best way for you to prepare for you level III exam is to teach ski lessons. Get on the horse.

In addition, continue to attend the wonderful clinics done by the masterful trainer at your home mountain. Did you have any trouble at your level I or II exam?
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty Guy
In addition, continue to attend the wonderful clinics done by the masterful trainer at your home mountain. Did you have any trouble at your level I or II exam?

Hmmm....who could this masterful trainer be?
post #16 of 18
Hans Harb.....distant long lost brother of Harald
post #17 of 18
Quote:
C.S. Lewis said, "No one can teach riding as well as a horse"
That's a great quote, Rusty.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
That's a great quote, Rusty.
I agree.......I think it speaks volumes
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