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Always keep left ski-left and right ski-right?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Whenever I bought a new pair of skis I always labeled on left and one right. I then would always keep them that way for their lifetime.

I recently picked up a new set of Atomic R10's and the guy at the shop told me that it is in fact better to mix it up, so as to distribute the wear better.

What is the consensus on this?
post #2 of 27
There is no difference between the skis.

Shops mark the skis L and R because that's the way your bindings passed the release test (with L and R boots) that is hypothetically done when the bindings are mounted.

Unless your boots are worn to the extreme, there is very little difference between the bindings either. On bindings that don't have adjustable toe wings/height, like Marker, there is no difference at all.

I mark mine just so I can keep track of which set of edges is sharper or duller than the other set.
post #3 of 27
I don´t think there will be a consensus.
At least I heard both views.
Typically, with race skis we have left and right
When the inner edge gets too narrow (and you are not so well-sponsored as to get unlimited numbers of new ones ) it´s no problem to switch them.
OTOH, I also read somewhere the material "gets used" to the original laterality and therefore it should be kept.
I wonder what opinions we get here.
And I just admire the amount of interesting questions appearing here.
It´s only a bit time-consuming to follow everything (and in a forreign language at that ).
post #4 of 27
Two obvious approaches, at least for recreational skis (either works):

- Switch them randomly, so they wear about equally.

- Mark them and use them one way until the edge gets damaged (or, if you're a really aggressive filer, thin), then reverse the markings.

As a variant on the latter, after you reverse the markings, you might put them on "backwards" (i.e. back in the original configuration) when conditions warrant. Sort of like having a set of "rock edges."
post #5 of 27
Use both of them. on either feet. It does not matter anymore like it did 10 years ago.
post #6 of 27
I'm with Sars, however they land when I drop em is how I step in em.

Not so 10 years ago, I tuned for dedicated l & r. Today I tune both sides equal, drop em and go.
post #7 of 27
Did'nt some skis have tips that were different on the left and right side ?
(One side smooth one with a little notch)

So they would be different depending which way round you wore them.

Don't know if it made a difference to the way they skied or whether it was purely the way they looked.
post #8 of 27
Many race skis have tip deflectors that are different left and right. It doesn't make any difference which foot they're on, unless you happen to deflect a gate (if then).
post #9 of 27
My SX:11s look funny on the wrong feet!
post #10 of 27
I ski one set of edges until they're dulled and then switch. The other set usually has a bit less sharpness left in them because those edges get used some too.
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by sars
Use both of them. on either feet. It does not matter anymore like it did 10 years ago.

here too.
post #12 of 27
I differentiate my edges by race and training. I don't really know why, since modern technique requires equal usage of both skis during a turn. My all mounains get no special distinction.
post #13 of 27
I definitely think you should keep the ski on your left foot to the left of the ski on your right foot. I tried it the other way round once when I was a kid but I kept falling over.
post #14 of 27
either way until I do some damage then I tend to protect the damaged edge/base section
post #15 of 27
I don't care what ski goes where unless there is some serious rock damage that cannot be fixed on mountain.
post #16 of 27
When I was racing on New England ice on laminated Rossignols Stratos we would pick up the inside ski and really lay into the downhill edge. The skis were shot in 15 days, and reversing left and right felt like a brand new ski. After 30 days I'd sell the skis.

Now I just put them on as they fall, and try to carve on two skis.
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiski
I definitely think you should keep the ski on your left foot to the left of the ski on your right foot. I tried it the other way round once when I was a kid but I kept falling over.

LOL great post kiwiski!

By the way as to your signature. I always say that I'm not superstitious. I feel that superstition is bad luck
post #18 of 27
I tend to swith skis at lunch. But it's not one way is "morning position" and another is afternoon, just whatever way i click in in the morning will be the opposite to how i ski them after lunch.
post #19 of 27
I ski in the Northeast, so I retain the habit I had from when I was racing: my skis are not marked L and R but I do mark my edges R and T (for race and train) written in permanent marker near the bindings. I keep both edges maintained the same way, but I ski with the T edges to the inside most of the time. If conditions are icy, or even if there's an icy section on a run, I switch the skis to the opposite foot so the R edges are on the inside and I have a better quality edge for the conditions. It's great to switch edges and have a fresh edge to slice up the ice.
post #20 of 27
For most skis, I believe that it's best to change them around between feet to share the wear. This isn't as good for my SX11s though because they have different sidecuts on each side of the ski and so don't feel the same if on the wrong feet (and look funny because of the tip shape).

Cheers

Closh
post #21 of 27
SX11s have a differential sidecut?

Not saying I know they don't (I don't have any), but that surprises me.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiski
I definitely think you should keep the ski on your left foot to the left of the ski on your right foot. I tried it the other way round once when I was a kid but I kept falling over.
Sounds like you need out riggers.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by closh
For most skis, I believe that it's best to change them around between feet to share the wear. This isn't as good for my SX11s though because they have different sidecuts on each side of the ski and so don't feel the same if on the wrong feet (and look funny because of the tip shape).

Cheers

Closh
You must be one of the only people on the plant with SX11's that have a different side cuts. In the US the SX11 all have the same side cut on both edges. The old Atomic 10.28 I think it was, was the only ski that came with a diferent side cut, as far as I know.
post #24 of 27
9.28, I think. There were other Atomics of the same period (10.26, old 9.20, 9.34 I think) that had cosmetic differences between the two skis in a pair, but I believe they were just cosmetic.
post #25 of 27
I differentiate for the reason mentioned above. If conditions get icy, you always have a good set of edges in reserve.
post #26 of 27
My original 1080's have asymmetrical caps on the tips. I have always skied with them facing inwards.
After reading this thread I think I'll try and maintain an "ice edge" with my new 1080's. (they have no caps on the tips)
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston
9.28, I think. There were other Atomics of the same period (10.26, old 9.20, 9.34 I think) that had cosmetic differences between the two skis in a pair, but I believe they were just cosmetic.
Yes, 9.28 for sure.
The retail ski had 28/30 m radius, the racestock (betalobes over the whole length of the ski) was symmetrical.
The next models 10.26, 10.22 etc. were only symmetrical.
Another asymmetrical ski was the "trench-carving" Beta 9.11, later Free Zone 10.11 (10/11 m).
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