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Foggy Goggles

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thought I might find some advice here on this topic.

I've skied for close to 30 years and get out about twice a year. I've always had a problem keeping my goggles from fogging. Every year or so, I'll buy a new pair and I try to buy ones that have a lot of ventilation. What appears to happen is that a lot of heat and moisture emit from my face and coat the inside of the lens. This first fogs then turns to ice. Once this process begins, it seems that the game is over....I can't clear it without making the problem worse.

Something that helps is to not wear a hat...thereby keeping my head from becoming as warm. While this helps, it doesn't work all the time.

Anybody with a similar problem have any suggestions as to the right goggles to buy or technique for dealing with this problem?

Thanks,

Matt
post #2 of 20

make your goggles stop fogging

if a goggle is put on inside where there is no temperature differential, and left on the whole time one is outside, there should be minimal or no problem of fogging.

one thing many people do is stick their chin in their jacket on the lift and breath inside the jacket. all the moist air comes right up the jacket and into the vents on the bottom of your goggles. the only way to combat this that i have found (short of breathing through an avalung the whole time) is to not stick your head in the jacket.

if this does happen a little, lift your head out of your jacket and breath away from the goggles the rest of the lift ride. the moisture should dissapate very quickly once you start moving down the trail - this is key!

when you remove goggles on a snowy or wet day, some moisture will always end up on the inside of the goggle.when you put the goggles back on, the moisture problem is exacerbated. one shouldn't be taking goggles off in such weather in the first place, anyway.

NEVER use anything other than a chamois or other such material on the insde of the lens - they scratch very easily and are coated with a soft anti-fog coating that can be easily removed.

if you are getting fogged and then iced over, there is a good chance that you are not overheating to the point where your body is just expelling too much moisture. if that was the case, you would simply stay hazy and moist inside the lens. so, work on the other tips.

don't ever buy a goggle that does not have a double lens! this works like a double-paned window and decreases the effect of the cold air outside and the warm inside your goggles by insulating them from eachother one more layer.

all this said, there are some people who will always fog up. every i know with this problem pretty much tolerate sunglasses, even though they are so woefully inadequate for foul-weather conditions (and a lot of people prefer never to wear sunglasses while skiing, regardless of weather!).
post #3 of 20
I have Oakley A Frames and the only time they ever fog is if I slide them up onto my
head. All I have to do to clear them is to put them on and ski, the ventaltion on these goggles is great. I have learned through the years to avoid wiping the goggles if they ares fogged as that seems to just make the problem worse.
post #4 of 20
oh yeah - always store your goggles in that nifty little bag that comes with them!
post #5 of 20
If all else fails, Smith sells a goggle with a small turbo fan built in. It blows air on the lens and keeps it fog free. They are very pricey ($150+), but if nothing else works for you, you might consider this. I've never tried them, but have read that they work under virtually all conditions.
post #6 of 20
I agree with SpringsRegular. In my experience the quality goggles are the ones that never fog up. I've had a few pairs of Oakleys and I've never had them fog up just while skiing (always been when I've put them up on my head, or hunched down with my collar up by my nose so that my breath goes up into them), and the fogging will always clear up within a couple seconds once I start skiing. They are rather pricey (especially the very well vented ones - Wisdoms and A Frames), but you really do get what you pay for. In addition to the anti-fogging properties, I find the Wisdoms and A Frames have superb peripheral vision and optical clarity.
post #7 of 20
Relating to unionbowler's no. 1- are you wearing a face mask or balaclava?
post #8 of 20
I use the Smith turbos with the fan. They work great for me. The reason I use them is my glasses always fog up inside the goggles in certain climates. The fan sucks air past the surface of my glasses from all the vent areas and exhausts it out the top. The fan has two speeds. I switch to high speed if I have to stop and talk for any length of time. Soon as I'm ready to go again, I can switch to low speed or turn the fan off entirely. Virtually every other anti-fog trick for glasses did not work for me.
post #9 of 20
Kneale, how long do the batteries last?
post #10 of 20
From skiing in the West in above-the-knee pow, usually it's snowing hard, etc. I put the Smith turbo CAM goggles on high fan speed - it lasts for two or three days. I also ski with a helmet, it doesn't fog up. It's a lot different if I fall in powder - but that happens to a few people at my level. I have some pretty good goggles in my pack, so when my Turbos get dry, I'll ski with them.

I have some rechargeable AAA batteries that I use (NiMH)- they keep up a charge that equals Ultra and other batteries on the high end.

I have learned the hard way to take the batteries out of the Turbos - since I fly to ski.
post #11 of 20
Many reasons and solutions for foggy goggles, covered pretty well here. I really pity those with this problem who must wear eyeglasses under their goggles. I think for a lot of casual skiers a big culprit is too much body heat from overdressing. Keep the hat on, but lose some of the extra sweaters and dress on the edge of uncomfortably cool. Unzip jacket on lift rides to vent heat and moisture. Once on the hill keep moving to facilitate better ventilation. Dressing lighter obviously can't be too inconsistent with outside temps, but another benefit is more mobility/flexibility on slopes and a quicker-on-your-feet feeling. Keep a thin, extra garment in a fanny/back pack or your pocket in case you get cold. On a heavy, wet snow day all bets are off.
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MRG10
Something that helps is to not wear a hat...thereby keeping my head from becoming as warm. While this helps, it doesn't work all the time.
I used to notice fogging while wearing a hat and found that my hat was blocking the vents on the top of the goggle. Now that I wear a helmet, I don't have that problem anymore.

I have an old pair of goggles that are supposedly designed for wearing glasses underneath. I found that they worked well as long as I was moving. If I stopped and was breathing hard, the goggles and my glasses would fog. They would both clear again by moving at reasonable speed. This was a really challenging way to learn moguls. Stopping to catch you breath meant that you would have to take the next few bumps nearly blind and have faith that the fog would clear if you just go fast enough.

All of my problems have left by switching to a helmet and contact lenses. I do follow the advice of leaving your goggles on as much as possible.
post #13 of 20
What unionbowler said.

Rule no. 1. Put them on dry and don't take them off your face.
post #14 of 20
Well, I have yet to try it....but one of the locals at SugarLoaf has always claimed that taping/sealing up the Bottom vents do the trick for her....along with...of course, keeping it off of your skihat/forehead....
post #15 of 20

Coating on Goggles

I learned many years ago that the "special sauce" coating applied to the goggles (and special manufacturer's cloths) is nothing more than liquid/pump hand-soap potion. Take some ordinary liquid hand soap, rub it into a soft cloth, until it's absorbed. Then treat the inside of your goggles by gently rubbing the inside. Do this before you go outside and get them all fogged up. That's it. If you have as you say, many pair of goggles, try it on an old pair if you are hesitant to try it on the new.

The action has something to do with creating "surface tension", which someone more science-minded than I can explain.

This technique has worked well for me for the past 20 years. I only need to replace goggle when they physically disintegrate (and I am prone to an inordinate amout of persperation.) Good luck!
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsqueezer
What unionbowler said.

Rule no. 1. Put them on dry and don't take them off your face.
Yup, also, nothing under the foam, no hats, or hair! I never have a problem as long as I don't take them off.
post #17 of 20
I stopped having trouble with fogging goggles since I have been wearing Carrera Kimerik goggles- they seem to have very good ventilation and almost instantly unfog. I do wear them with a helmet which i think might give them a better seal.
post #18 of 20
I used to have problems with goggles foggint and never do now. Tricks--

Don't mess with them.

NEVER exhale improperly. One sigh at the wrong angle and it's all over.
post #19 of 20
Use the force. no just kiddin'

Treat them like a pair of SCUBA goggles whcih means never taking them off unless you have to. Also many people make the mistake of putting the upper part of the goggle on over the hat etc. this is not good. Create as much of a closed environment as possible.

I always carry two pair of googles for the o' so fun powder wipe outs. When you can't see after fogging or wipe out; quickly remove the thrashed google shake them loose of snow/water and place them in the pocket of jacket quickly replace with the dry pair in your other pocket. By the time you need the other pair they are usually dried out and ready to go. Carry your little cloth carrying bag and those dry the goggles off pretty well.

Cheers!
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj
Many reasons and solutions for foggy goggles, covered pretty well here. I really pity those with this problem who must wear eyeglasses under their goggles. I think for a lot of casual skiers a big culprit is too much body heat from overdressing. Keep the hat on, but lose some of the extra sweaters and dress on the edge of uncomfortably cool. Unzip jacket on lift rides to vent heat and moisture. Once on the hill keep moving to facilitate better ventilation. Dressing lighter obviously can't be too inconsistent with outside temps, but another benefit is more mobility/flexibility on slopes and a quicker-on-your-feet feeling. Keep a thin, extra garment in a fanny/back pack or your pocket in case you get cold. On a heavy, wet snow day all bets are off.
I usually ski with an outerwear shell (pants/jacket), one mock zip-tee turtleneck (it's cold, I'll wear a long underwear crewneck), cycling jersey, and a windstopper vest. I always ski with a pack or a Camelback, a thicker top and some dry socks. I wear glasses with Smith Turbo CAM goggles, and unless I fall in powder, the steeps, or the trees, I'm good to go.
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