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Etiquette while being passed. - Page 3

post #61 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grizz
What music would you suggest?
Maybe the theme music from "The Benny Hill Show"?

http://www.tv-timewarp.co.uk/midi_files/BennyHill.mid
post #62 of 85
I ski with head phones. I am not a dangerous skier. If you blow an air horn behind me, I will become dangerous and you will get hurt.
post #63 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15
I am not a dangerous skier. If you blow an air horn behind me, I will become dangerous and you will get hurt.
My thoughts as well. Actually, if you plan to blow an air horn at me on the slopes, it'd be a good idea to grease the horn up before you do so.
post #64 of 85
I'd pick out one with a nice, gently tapered shape...if I were you Grizz...
post #65 of 85

Whoa there pinhead

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15
I ski with head phones. I am not a dangerous skier. If you blow an air horn behind me, I will become dangerous and you will get hurt.
How? The laughing fit watching you "become dangerous" causes a brain aneurysm?

What's up with the threat (even with a smiley)? Tele is about love, not fighting. Better review the "Have you ever fought at a Resort" thread at telemarktips.
post #66 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13
My thoughts as well. Actually, if you plan to blow an air horn at me on the slopes, it'd be a good idea to grease the horn up before you do so.
The horn isn't rusty (it's frequently used) and operates smoothly, why would I need to grease it?

Where would I find Horn grease? Is that next to the Mink-oil in the lubricants department?
post #67 of 85

Not that there's any thing wrong with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
I'd pick out one with a nice, gently tapered shape...if I were you Grizz...

That sounds like the voice of experience. You should find coach13. I think you've got the same "game" in mind.

I'll stick to skiing.
post #68 of 85
You're a funny guy Grizz. You just keep blowing, you're horn that is.

As soon as you blow it in the right ear, it'll take care of itself.
post #69 of 85
This simple request on a point of etiquette has certainly stimulated some interesting debate! Without blowing my own trumpet (sorry), I feel if you can't overtake someone safely on a catwalk, without having to resort to calls, horns, or the Ride of the Valkries (complete with 'copter noise and "I love the smell of napalm in the mornings" soundtrack), how about just throwing your skis into a gliding wedge and waiting?

You might get to that next lift line 30 seconds later, or have to expend some energy poling. But the world won't have ended, and you won't have confused or scared some poor newcomer to the sport.

And (this occurred to me while stuck behind the "Over the Hill Gang" the other day), what if the poor skier ahead happens to be a little hard of hearing?
post #70 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Bell
This simple request on a point of etiquette has certainly stimulated some interesting debate! Without blowing my own trumpet (sorry), I feel if you can't overtake someone safely on a catwalk, without having to resort to calls, horns, or the Ride of the Valkries (complete with 'copter noise and "I love the smell of napalm in the mornings" soundtrack), how about just throwing your skis into a gliding wedge and waiting?

You might get to that next lift line 30 seconds later, or have to expend some energy poling. But the world won't have ended, and you won't have confused or scared some poor newcomer to the sport.

And (this occurred to me while stuck behind the "Over the Hill Gang" the other day), what if the poor skier ahead happens to be a little hard of hearing?
It's just like driving or riding a motorcycle on your favourite twisty road. Just when you get to the good section, you get stuck behind some old man wearing a hat or someone with the latest and greatest equipment, but no clue how to use it.
post #71 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
It's just like driving or riding a motorcycle on your favourite twisty road. Just when you get to the good section, you get stuck behind some old man wearing a hat or someone with the latest and greatest equipment, but no clue how to use it.
Except the catwalk isn't the good section. Beginners aren't on the good sections of ski mountains.
post #72 of 85

Yahtzee

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Bell
how about just throwing your skis into a gliding wedge and waiting?

You might get to that next lift line 30 seconds later, or have to expend some energy poling. But the world won't have ended, and you won't have confused or scared some poor newcomer to the sport.
Great answer. I agree.

Sorry to expose everyone to my horn honking, tele blader alter ego. I thought a little satire might be fun.

My .02

If you're moving only a little faster call on your left or right.

Moving quite a bit faster, don't say anything and try to pass as far away from them as possible.

If you can't do either safely use MB's suggestion.

The passie shouldn't have to do anything different than what they are already doing.
post #73 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grizz
The passie shouldn't have to do anything different than what they are already doing.
Exactly.
post #74 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13
My thoughts as well. Actually, if you plan to blow an air horn at me on the slopes, it'd be a good idea to grease the horn up before you do so.
I didn't relise you northern hemisphere folk were this funny
post #75 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
It is true that some skiers think that "on your left" means you wish them to move to the left. People can be pretty stupid and when you add to that the fact that they may be nervous and very inwardly-focused *and* the fact that no one is teaching people this kind of etiquette anymore, one shouldn't be too surprised...
Not stupid, really. You ever hear the old advice about how you tend to go towards where you are looking? So when you hear a voice/sound behind you, especially saying something about "left" or "right" side, you will naturally fix your attention towards that direction. And you drift towards that direction.

I tend to do that, and I don't believe I am stupid.
post #76 of 85
I just meant that human beings, in general...tend to be pretty stupid...not just skiers and not just in these circumstances.
post #77 of 85
Just yell frantically, at the top of your lungs:

"LOOK OUT!!"

That'll freeze-em right up so you can safely get by....
post #78 of 85
Interesting thread

As a newbie who's been taught slope etiquette by the French (make of that what you will!) I'll simply say what I'd think/feel/do - be it right or wrong.

If I'm skiing and hear someone behind me yell/call/mumble or otherwise vocalise anything that I doubt is profane and think may be directed towards me - I'll a) realise they're there (god knows *where* exactly!) - and hence b) not fall over when they suddenly appear on my left/right doing mach2 on one leg - or indeed if they just cruise by and wave in a 'friendly manner' (perhaps something else that could be discussed? - you're talking about US/Canadian slopes right? not French ones? I was kinda hoping that coming over there would expose us to a little more smiling and 'have a nice day')

Now my wife is likely to forget her lessons and look around - she's always making sure she's not in the way (and hence messing up her stance and hence going slowly and hence getting in the way, <sigh> but time will help)

Of course - there are people out there who will *assume* that any call is somehow an insult - but that's people and that's their lookout.
Lots of aggression - reminds me of rush hour in the car when people get into road-rage after someone flashes their lights and people think it means 'piss off' and don't realise it meant 'thanks'

Interestingly the skiingman incident sounds like a typical 'shock' reaction - if he'd called out "hi, coming through" then I wonder if the same thing would have happened?

So, applying common sense and the old phrase that words mean what I intend them to mean, no more, no less - I'd be happy to yell/call (in a nice, mellow modulated voice - maybe with a British accent just for fun) "I say chaps, would you mind orfully if I passed on your left"
post #79 of 85
What really irritates me about French people is when they criticize my etiquette (I think they say I'm gauche or something), then pass me on the left.
post #80 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by lbt
Of course - there are people out there who will *assume* that any call is somehow an insult - but that's people and that's their lookout.
Lots of aggression - reminds me of rush hour in the car when people get into road-rage after someone flashes their lights and people think it means 'piss off' and don't realise it meant 'thanks'
These people are the problem. The same people that go "fast enough" in the left lane of the highways.

All the other complaints I have just stem from dealing with the "experts" at Killingtonesque resorts. The people that feel entitled to gape all over the whole mountain, with no sense of etiquette, technique, etc.

Actual beginners don't often find themselves on traverses at the top of mountains, unless bored ski instructors bring them there. Which is a bad idea, for a whole bunch of reasons.
-Garrett
post #81 of 85

Ohhhh Nooooo...

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston
What really irritates me about French people is when they criticize my etiquette (I think they say I'm gauche or something), then pass me on the left.
dooood... you're fired. this joke is a real groaner!

I bike and ski and use the ole "OYL/OYR" as a form of polite passing ettiquette. When people call to me I always say thanks. As someone said in an early post - we're just communicating!

As a few have noted there are lots of places on a Mtn where you need to keep speed up to avoid a hike/skate... especially! for snowboarders.

The other day I snowboarder "pushed-off" on me: as he went by he put his hands against my body to prevent me from disturbing his line. Now THAT warranted a full body check (with poles).

Hey Grizz - I decided to put a bike bell on my ski pole... when I am going to pass I will ring it! LOL

kiersten
post #82 of 85

Not for the faint of heart.

Quote:
I ski leather supercomps on salomon snowblades mounted with pitpull tele bindings. What music would you suggest?
Folk music. Oh, pretty definitely folk music.

And now, The Fish Slapping Dance.
post #83 of 85

On the other hand...

Quote:
Originally Posted by klkaye
The other day I snowboarder "pushed-off" on me: as he went by he put his hands against my body to prevent me from disturbing his line. Now THAT warranted a full body check (with poles).
Since you apparently are apt to look good in a baby T, a full body check may have been the reaction the boarder had in mind...
post #84 of 85

Ez Killer!

whoa!

jstraw... now you better be a good boy! :

kiersten
post #85 of 85

Hide the leather

Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
And now, The Fish Slapping Dance.
Shhhhhhhh, you're going to attract PETA.
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