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Curious Question for the Professional Ski Instructors out there

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
Just a little poll:

1. How many here do ski instruction as their primary source of money?

2. If your part time, what is your "money" job? How do you balance the 2 careers?

3. What do you do for your off-season job if your a seasonal worker.

(example of 1 would be the instructors I met on Mt Hood. They teach year round)

(example of 2 would be a PSIA III cert I met at carver camp, that has flex time at work and teaches on the non-flex time)

(an example of 3 would be someone that teaches full time skiing in the winter, but, like a farmer, just plays in the summer, or does a different job in the summer)

I'm thinking of entering ski instruction as a part timer in about 5 to 8 years, so am curious how this very seasonal job skill is handled by the experienced instructors out there.

Thanks!
post #2 of 35
5 to 8 years? Wow, John, why the big wait? It doesn't take that long to become instructor grade,,,, get to it boy!

Don't know where you ski, but plenty of guys near ski areas that offer night skiing find it very easy to instruct evenings and weekends and maintain a real job by day.

As far as us full time guys, well, that's another story. Personally I pulled it off for many years by living like a bum and investing like Buffet. Kids, don't try this at home.

MOMMAS, DON'T LET YOUR BABIES GROW UP TO BE DOWNHILLERS!!

FASTMAN
post #3 of 35
My experience is that one makes enough money to get by teaching in the winter, there are lots of slack periods followed by seven day a week periods. Also there is a cycle to the business, Thanksgiving busy, then slow till dec. 20. Super busy till Jan. 7th and so on. Please be aware of this there is no balance to your income.
As far as summer I am a fly-fishing outfitter, but this also pays sort of poorly and is seasonal. Most instructors I know practice the trades during the summer months, I am in Summit County and there is limitless building going on here. You learn how to cope with the buget thing and remember you are residing where others only dream of!
My suggestion is to make sure your other half is gainfully employed!!!!
post #4 of 35
so,
direct answer,
I was a full time character, in winter, and tennis in summer for 12 years,
then I had kids, got injured (broken hand in april leading into tennis season),
and diversified.
now, I sell houses, invest, and teach a couple days a week,
i'm not as tied to the snow conditions and don't ski quite as well,
but life is good and I can pay my daycare with a cast on...
Oh, and I pay way to much in taxes now...

Cheers,

wade
post #5 of 35
John, you could likely start this winter, if you really want to.

I started with a goal of being full-time last year. Then, the day after the hiring clinic, I got a "real job" as an IT industry analyst. I backed off to parttime, but even that was unsustainable for me, so I had to drop out in February. Since April I've been working as a VP at an early-stage technology company (http://www.rovingplanet.com/), and it's going to be even more difficult this year.

You aren't likely to make a profit teaching until after you hit level III cert, given the costs of training, books, etc. At least that's been my experience, FWIW.
post #6 of 35
I'm a part timer in the mid-atlantic. We have a 10-12 week season which makes my exhausting winter schedule tolerable. I live 85 mi. from my home area so multiple trips during the week is not a great option. We are the lowest paid instructors in the country (I think), so the money is more like a stipend. My mountain requires us to effectively work 3 shifts a week or equivalent (about 30 shifts for the season). Thankfully holidays count double.

Here's how I do it..... every weekend Sat. and Sun. plus holidays and rogue double shift (we have night skiing) to make up for the weekends I go skiing for me. The rest of the week I work Mon.-Fri. as an environmental lab tech for the local municipality.

Yes... I'm very busy in winter.
post #7 of 35
John--there isn't a better way to improve your skiing and your understanding than to try to teach it to others, along with the regular clinics and feedback on your skiing that dedicated instructors have at their disposal--if they choose to pursue it.

There are lots of benefits, and it can be a great lifestyle, but don't try to justify teaching skiing on a financial basis! You've got to do it for other reasons. I know a guy who actually attained his Level 3 (Full) certification after several years of traveling almost every weekend from Dallas, Texas to a small resort in New Mexico--with his family! Believe me, the money he made teaching didn't even put a dent in the expense of the commute. But only he could measure the intangible rewards.

I also have a friend who is an attorney in Pittsburgh who, for many years, moved his whole family to Colorado during Christmas break and the month of March. He also managed to attain full certification after a number of years (it is not easy), and his family became excellent skiers.

And then there's the neurosurgeon who suspends her practice for about half the ski season so she can teach skiing, as one of the top instructors at another major Colorado resort.

And of course, there are many part-time instructors who live near the mountains and teach skiing weekends and holidays.

So there are options. Or you could just quit your career entirely, move to the mountains, and jump in full time. You'd be in good company there too. I know doctors, lawyers, business executives, and pretty much every other career, who have done that and never looked back.

You may lose tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars of income. But you'll get a free pass!

And the rewards will be many.

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #8 of 35
Barnes does speak the truth here. My boss (at the mountain) is called a "recovering lawyer" by the troops in the instructors' shack. I'm a lawyer, not yet recovered. . . but maybe . . . some day . . .
post #9 of 35
Oboe, I'm sure you realize that one is never "recovered", but only "in recovery". So don't be too hard on yourself.
post #10 of 35
Thread Starter 

I don't have to teach to get a free pass

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado
You may lose tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars of income. But you'll get a free pass!
or I can wait 20 more years and get that - but by then, like social security, they'll probably raise the age
post #11 of 35
Thread Starter 

my 5 to 8 year time frame

Don't want to hijack the post, but my personal situation will not allow a structural move to ski country till I semi-retire. I mean, sure I could hang it all up and do it, but to do so would definately let my employes and my clients down. There will come a time and a place.

My thinking is more along the lines of when I retire a tad early, I want to still do something and give something. I love skiing, so it's a natural and a fun way to keep very active.

I could get started though on some type of certification and even perhaps some part time instruction. That would have to be on weekends and would be a 5 hour round trip drive for the 3 closest resorts. I could certainly start that exploration process now.

In my own case I would want to pursue a resort that is comfortable with a DTP approach. That may limit my options somewhat. I'll have to look into that.

Great feedback so far. Keep it up! Very interesting personal stories. I see a lot of "love of skiing" comes first and the career is to feed the skiing type situations. (I might be catogarized as that right now as I diligently work on spending my kids inheritance to ski)
post #12 of 35
I coach from Thanksgiving to April. Mostly nights and weekends (sometimes 3 and 4 day weekends) I work two weeks each summer at Mt Hood(23 years this summer). About 25% of my income is from skiing.
My "real job"(real skiers don't have real jobs) is running a one-man Auto repair shop. I specialize in British and Italian cars but do pretty much everything to keep the money coming in. I have the reputation of doing the things other shops can't or won't do(like Peugeots And TVRs). It gets pretty slow in the winter when most of my customers store their "toys". That's OK with me.
post #13 of 35
This has been very intersting. There is a common thread amoung all of us that read through all these posts. We all have a burning passion for sompthing. I am sure there are also epic ski like pages that deal with how to fix old cars or even bowling for god sakes somewhere on the web.

The point of all this dribble is that basicly what makes ski pros successful is passion for the sport and sharing it with others. Follow your heart and the rest will follow. The world will always give you what you need. If you get more than that, you are probably stealing it from another part of your life.

"I am gonna start that diet on monday".
Mondays are for fat people.:

Living is about you, right now. Although thoughtful working for your clients and employees for the next 5 years is just existing. Unless you love what you do, that makes all the difference.

Now if you realy had ski instructor genes you would have already figured out a deal for your clients to pay for your certifications, pay your employees extra, to work harder so you could teach skiing to these same clients .
post #14 of 35
I got involved due to personal/family circumstances, convenience and love for the sport.

just a little background. I am a full time engineer by train. I have been skiing on and off for over 20 years but I never considered myself to be an avid nor even a good skier. My passion for the sport kicked in when I discovered my kids taking interest in the sport at a young age. We live 35-40 minutes from the nearest resort. Since then, skiing has been my personal time with them (especially the girls) so I have made it appoint to take them at least one day each weekend. Because I believe in good instructions leading to good results, I scheduled to have them taking full day lessons every other week. The now 8-year old has since joined a racing development program residing at the resort on every Saturday. So now, Sunday became my ski time together as a family.

The thought of being an instructor started when it was one year after being unsuccessful in finding a worthy job since I got laidoff. Because the minimum wage jobs were the only jobs available, I figure why not try ski instructing since I really enjoy the sport and I make it to the resort often anyway. While I am doing this, maybe I can bring home a little money.
Last year was my first year. To qualify as part time, I was scheduled to work between 1 to 2 week nights and a weekend. Because the pay is so low, on the short days (sent home due to weather etc.) I was lucky if I brought home more than what I put out in gas money. Also, there was after school cost involved because when I'm ski teaching I'm not home to do all the drop offs and pickups. With all griping aside, this job was the most rewarding, knowledge filling and enjoyable job that I've ever had. It was just down right addictive. In a nutshell about the job... 1. Pay sucks ($5.25/hour - 10 cents more than minimum wage). 2. Benefits are great (free season pass for me, discounted/free passes for the family, deeply discounted full day kid's program, free self enhancing clinics. 3. Work/responsibility is demanding and challenging.

I have since gotten a temporary full time job in my own field recently so the money part is no longer a concern unless/until I lose my job again. But, juggling my and the family's schedule to ski teach will be harder. The up side is that the teaching season around here is just over 2 months. So, I decided to give it another try. I really look forward to my second year of instructing.
post #15 of 35
Thread Starter 

Actually doing some of that already

Quote:
Originally Posted by mosh
Now if you realy had ski instructor genes you would have already figured out a deal for your clients to pay for your certifications, pay your employees extra, to work harder so you could teach skiing to these same clients .
I love my "for money" work too.

I am already overlapping things. Sometimes I do some client work on my "ski outings" and definately ski with clients whenever I can. This gets some of the expense legitimately deductable as far as the getting out there goes. (as long as I schedule a training or something legitimate) I have clients I ski with at Mammoth and in Colorado so far. I have some out east that would ski with me too, if I get out that way.

I think my client that is the most nuts about skiing, though, is from miami, but she hardly ever gets to go. (I bought my Ovo helmet in Miami when it was about 90 degrees in June then skied on Mt hood that weekend with my "Miami" helmet. The Miami stores do a brisk business from South American customers that come up and visit, buy stuff, then ski with it back south. I was looking for "discounts" but then found summer is their busy season.)

My California skiing client has a condo at Mammoth that I stay at. So there're are nice perks. (I also traded him some of my night pano's of yosemite for lodging too) So I work for food and lodging. Just read my cardboard sign. Donations accepted.

That convertible classic automobile shop sounds perfect for the dual seasonal arrangement. Very nice fit. (which camp at hood? I've skied their at camps the last two summers.)
post #16 of 35
Thread Starter 

wow - love of the job

Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr
In a nutshell about the job... 1. Pay sucks ($5.25/hour - 10 cents more than minimum wage). 2. Benefits are great (free season pass for me, discounted/free passes for the family, deeply discounted full day kid's program, free self enhancing clinics. 3. Work/responsibility is demanding and challenging.[/font]

I have since gotten a temporary full time job in my own field recently so the money part is no longer a concern unless/until I lose my job again. But, juggling my and the family's schedule to ski teach will be harder. The up side is that the teaching season around here is just over 2 months. So, I decided to give it another try. I really look forward to my second year of instructing.
From engineering to 5.25/hr ski instruction. Anyone ever tip you? You can't support a family on that alone.

My son sucked me into this sport too march 2003. As he starts his career teaching cheerleading in Georgia, our times together will be meeting for ski trips. We are spending a 2 week colorado vacation skiing in December, then he moves away to Georgia. So I can certainly relate to the kids getting you into the sport.

Good luck on that temp job. You have many more options than I do given your location. Nothing would be easy from here for me even to get started.
post #17 of 35
Mosh,

Going on a diet????? What, did you get FAT this summer??????

Over the years working in the mountains, I've figured it out. At least I would like to think so.

1. Not being married

2. Working six months out of the year teaching skiing six days a week.

3. Working three months out of the year teaching fly fishing four to five days a week. I could do this everyday in the summer and did for many years, but I'm a little burnt on doing it everyday. So that leaves plenty of time to ride my mountain bike.

So lets see, that's eight months. That leaves four months to travel around and fish for myself and go to really cool places and ride my bike. That works for me!-----Wigs
post #18 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
From engineering to 5.25/hr ski instruction. Anyone ever tip you? You can't support a family on that alone.
Are you kidding me? If I was counting on the NET pay from part time ski instruction alone to feed and house the family, everyone would have been out sleeping in the streets and eating off dumpsters. I do consider myself lucky that my wife, who does the same line of work working for the same boss, survive the rounds of layoffs. She incidentally and instantly became officially the head of the household.

As for the tips, the highest I've gotten was $10 for teaching munchins, 3-4 yr old, for a 1+ hour lesson. That was pretty good, you say. Well, the fact is it was the only one I got all season long. An expectation for tips from working during the week was out of the question because they were all bussed in students from the neighboring schools. The weekend was the only chance for gratuity of any kind. Unfortunately, in the particular region that I live in, the population is traditionally very frugal -- not all poor but all cheap.

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
As he starts his career teaching cheerleading in Georgia, our times together will be meeting for ski trips. We are spending a 2 week colorado vacation skiing in December, then he moves away to Georgia.
You know, that is so heart warming. When my kids eventually move away, I wish they will be motivated by the sport to spend time with this staling old man.

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
My son sucked me into this sport too march 2003. So I can certainly relate to the kids getting you into the sport.
Hey, it ain't right to blame your son for your addiction. BTW, did you mean March 2003? That couldn't be when you started skiing.:

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
Good luck on that temp job.
Hey, I need all the luck I can get. Unlike what our president told us, our economy is not quite blooming yet. The signs for an upswing has been there for the last few months but nothing has been real. He is right about one thing though. There are indeed many jobs available out there. The detail that he left out was that no one can live off any of them. Did I just got off the topic? Sorry!

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
You have many more options than I do given your location. Nothing would be easy from here for me even to get started.
Just in case you are unfamiliar with our region, Upstate NY (to us, 100+ miles from Metro NY) and the Binghamton area in particular was greatly and directly impacted by the recession and all the jobs moving out of the country. So, I am not sure if this area is better off than most or yours. Frankly, with my experience and background, it should not have taken me 1.5 years to get back into the field, which incidentally was the only thing that cropped up including any real interviews. The really sad part was that I do consider myself to be one of the few lucky ones. :
post #19 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
I could get started though on some type of certification and even perhaps some part time instruction. That would have to be on weekends and would be a 5 hour round trip drive for the 3 closest resorts. I could certainly start that exploration process now.
I would definitely do this. If you work yourself up to a full cert over the next 5 years or so, you'll be able to teach pretty much anywhere--and work your way into the hierarchy quite well. Getting to PSIA level II shouldn't be too big a hurdle for you over the next few years, but full cert is quite a step up, and will likely take quite a bit of learning (both on- and off-snow). I guarantee you'll learn a ton going through the process, though.

Unlike you, I've been skiing for many years (this will be my 34th season). Like you, I'm pretty new to the formal teaching gig (parttime last year, as I mentioned). I thought I was pretty well-read and knew a lot about skiing, but I learned more last year than I had in a long, long time. Maybe ever.

...and I got to meet some pretty great people, too...

Good luck!
post #20 of 35
Thread Starter 

yep - I'm a very new skier

Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr
Hey, it ain't right to blame your son for your addiction. BTW, did you mean March 2003? That couldn't be when you started skiing.:
Here I am on my first ski trip March 2003 the day after my first lesson which was my 3rd day of skiing.

small pic
http://www.fototime.com/0C09149CC43F3EF/standard.jpg
large pic
http://www.fototime.com/0C09149CC43F3EF/orig.jpg

How's that for a defensive braking wedge!! (and back seat to boot!) (speaking of which, I still have scars on my right leg from that boot)

I'm very familiar with your area. IBM was big time in that area. Lots of layoffs. My brother lived in the Endicott area just west of you. Lots of ski areas in NY. In fact I believe it's 50 resorts, more than any state in the USA.
post #21 of 35
John
Why do you want to be an instructor?
What do you think the typical day for and instructor is like?
post #22 of 35
Thread Starter 

Good question

I taught two relatives so far and really enjoyed it. More importantly these two relatives really enjoyed it. This was surely NOT the typical ski lesson day as most lessons are not privates but small groups or large groups.

It's not that I 'want' too - or 'need' too. But I am looking to become a migratory species of human. On my western high-altitude migration I thought it might be something worthwhile to do rather than just ski all the time for my own personal enjoyment. As strange as it sounds to some, that type of retirement, to me, would not be near as fun as working and helping other people learn to ski.

That's almost another question for the instructors here. In the niche you have, how many do private/small group instruction vs the busload of kids instruction? What is the typical size of a group you're given to teach?

I teach a lot in my current profession. I enjoy giving people tools to allow them to be successful. This enjoyment would carry over to any type of teaching endeavor including skiing. My last course at college the teacher told me I should teach. He wrote me a letter encouraging me to go that direction. He didn't have in mind skiing I'm sure. (the rest of the story was I took 27 years to graduate, so this last course and that teachers advice was only only a couple of years ago)

BillA - are you an instructor? If you are, why would you ask? Do you enjoy ski instruction? (Of course you may be asking the question after seeing my pics in the prior post )
post #23 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
That's almost another question for the instructors here. In the niche you have, how many do private/small group instruction vs the busload of kids instruction? What is the typical size of a group you're given to teach?
That's another reason to get your certs up. With them, you're more likely to get smaller classes, if that's what you'd like...
post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
Here I am on my first ski trip March 2003 the day after my first lesson which was my 3rd day of skiing.
How's that for a defensive braking wedge!! (and back seat to boot!) (speaking of which, I still have scars on my right leg from that boot)
So, you actually started skiing 1.5 years ago? Assuming that you're not pulling my leg, I (and along others I am sure) have something I'm dying to ask just for curiosity. What skill level are you at now?

As for the pic, other than being a bit stiff and hands being a little low. Your small wedge and little back seat make you look pretty good for a newbie, especially a not-so-young one. Then again, you could very well be emulating a beginner -- an important skill as an instructor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
I'm very familiar with your area. IBM was big time in that area. Lots of layoffs. My brother lived in the Endicott area just west of you. Lots of ski areas in NY. In fact I believe it's 50 resorts, more than any state in the USA.
Actually, I'm in Maine, which is North of Endicott. Funny you mentioned IBM. Although it is not the only attributor, that was precisely the cheapskatedness culture that I was referring to.Incidentally, my career started with IBM Owego 20 years ago.
post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
What is the typical size of a group you're given to teach?
I am sure it's not typical of all resorts, I've had two consecutive classes that went from almost 20 to 1 in the next. A large bunch of attitude-filled middle school never evers with vastly varying natural ability can be very hard to manage sometimes.
post #26 of 35
BillA - are you an instructor?
Yes

If you are, why would you ask?
Just curious

Do you enjoy ski instruction?
I find it very rewarding especially when some one has one of those ah ha moments when the light bulb goes on. This will be my tenth year instructing. I have my lvl 1 and I'm working on lvl 2.
Max group size is eight but occasionally it may go to nine or ten depending on how busy it is. Most of the lessons I teach are to never evers because most of the lessons we sell are to never evers.
post #27 of 35
Thread Starter 

Chanwmr - Skier Level and comments on "faked picture".

If I under stand the levels correctly - I ski parallel, can do salom and gs courses pretty well, do some bumps. I think that would put me hovering around 7 and 8. I'm going to my 2nd all mountain camp in Jan at A-basin that I hope will put me more solidly in the 8 level. I'm at 76 days now and March 2005 will be my 2 year aniversary.

I am a ski technique junky and like to emulate the different styles of skiers I ski with. So as I've skied on trips with friends that have skied for decades I try out what I see them doing for kicks. So I've played around with feet locked dipping shoulders to get my edging as a for instance as well as up/unweighting pivots. Neither are my own preference, but it's just fun to try it all out.

Recently I've been doing a lot of work on Harb Carvers and these don't allow as much variance of technique as they are like a locked in carving ski even at transition.

But, you're right, I could certainly "fake" a picture like that, but that was real. It was the Quicksilver run at Breckenridge after my lesson. I'll have to check the time stamp on the original jpeg. It's either the afternoon of the lesson day, or the next morning. I think it's the next morning so that would put it on my 3rd day of skiing. (a year and 1/2 later I taught my own brother in law and had him parallel on blues on his first day - needless to say, I didn't teach him what I was taught)

Here is another one. This was later that same day when my son and "friend" thought I was ready for a blue.
http://www.fototime.com/AF43C215D4385BA/standard.jpg
I wasn't ready so I deadheaded down the lift thanks to my little visit to the ski patrol hut that was about 50 feet away. They said they'd rather send me down that way then having to cart me off the slopes injured.

Here I am August 2003 my 20th day with my son (the one that got me into this sport) at Mt Hood. (like that "race" outfit I was wearing?)
http://www.fototime.com/A719FD7BAB59A30/standard.jpg

Here is Mt Hood Sept 2003 when it for the first time failed to open after lift maintenance. I had been skiing at least once a month since I started. But missed September (but not for lack of trying).
http://www.fototime.com/09364AF145780B1/standard.jpg
(just for reference for those not familar with the lane divided Palmer Snow Field on Mt Hood, here is a similar shot taken in August 2003)
http://www.fototime.com/2EB2ED48FC3799E/standard.jpg

Here I am 9 months later at Beaver Creek getting my first taste of Powder:
http://www.fototime.com/7C933367D58D733/standard.jpg

Here I am Spring 2004 skiing with a client/friend (he is taking the picture) at Mammoth.
http://www.fototime.com/5D62E6A6961F693/standard.jpg

Here is a shot on the way down from the prior shot in the cornice bowl at mammoth:
looking to my right from where I stopped:
http://www.fototime.com/2BE93312CC60DDE/standard.jpg
and just because it's such a nice shot - here it is full size - it's a great shot of the gondola at mammoth. (warning - larger)
http://www.fototime.com/2BE93312CC60DDE/orig.jpg
looking to my left from where I stopped:
http://www.fototime.com/38C7A0D9CCDEF54/standard.jpg

Slightly more than 1 in 4 of my ski days have been private lessons or lessons in a camp setting. I'm at 76 days now. No pic was faked.
post #28 of 35

Impressive progress John

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
Here is another one. This was later that same day when my son and "friend" thought I was ready for a blue.
If it wasn't for you looking down, you one knee pointing downward and your poles being on the same side stuck in the snow, you could look like you were aggressively coming around a gate. That pic can really use some computer touch up.

BTW, thanks for sharing your pics.
post #29 of 35
1. How many here do ski instruction as their primary source of money? No. Ski instruction is something that I do becuase I love it and it provides an outlet that I do not get from my regular job.

2. If your part time, what is your "money" job? How do you balance the 2 careers? I work in the environmental field. My regular work week is 55+ hours. Its a tough thing to juggle since my time on the hill is time away from my family. And don't kid yourself, its not for the money. By the time you pay for gas and gear, you are LUCKY to break even. But the perks are good. Where would you rather be on a snowy weekend? Sitting looking out your window or crawling around on your hands and knees with 7 or 8 kids who have never skied before? I'll take the kids any day.

3. What do you do for your off-season job if your a seasonal worker. I'm not seasonal but if I was I'd like to work on a charter fishing boat or as a life guard.

Why wait so long. You'll be sorry for the lost time.
post #30 of 35
John,

I retired from well paying city job in 1997. I had already moved to Colorado and was commuting the last three years of somewhat gainful employment. Then I was on Social Security and my union pension. I looked at the cost of skiing and decided that I needed a skiing job to support my habit. I found two jobs at the same time; one teaching skiing and one in guest relations at a different ski area. As they were part time, I took them both. The instructor job was 135 miles from home, so I stayed over in a motel. The SSD was a well known director and he really taught me a lot. He moved on after my second year. That was a great disappointment. The new SSD was highly incompetent. We had no clinics for two years, except for the preseason clinic. I retired at the end of 2003 season. It was no longer worth the long drive and the lack of training was the determining factor. Under the first SSD, I was able to get my Green Accredidation with PMTS. I wanted to move up to Blue, but without some serious training, it was not going to happen.

I will turn seventy in a month (December), so lift passes will no longer be an issue. For instance an A-Basin season pass will cost me $30. The high dollar one is Steamboat at $205. As the old saying went. "No problemo!"

I still teach, but I am pretty selective. As I am not associated with a ski school, the areas where I can teach are pretty limited. I find this type of teaching very rewarding, as I usually know the clients pretty well and we both have a lot of fun.

Rick H
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