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East or West - Page 2

post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB
Harry Morgan,

Here in the East we have bad weather, bad snow, small mountains, crowded areas, expensive lift tickets and shorter seasons. Fantasizing that we are better skiers than our Western friends is all we got.

Seriously, I doubt that an expert skier from the West would have any trouble skiing in the East, so I understand what Lisamarie is saying. But bring an intermediate and you may get a few surprises. Just like many decent skiers in the East, get all screwed up in big Western powder.
Funny and insightful on both points.
post #32 of 55
Here comes the new east/west thread, same as the old east/west thread.
post #33 of 55
Quote:
posted by epic:
I didn't realize how bad skiing here sucks. Why do we bother?
Skiing in the East may suck, epic, but it doesn't suck so bad it isn't GREAT!

It's no different here than in the Midwest. It's a whole lot better in the West, but so what?

East beats the hell out of Milton Keynes.
post #34 of 55
Ah yes, East coast skiing - just about the only place you can ski in the rain while it's below freezing temps, on crowded short trails, and see the grass through the clear "snow" (some people call it ice, we used to call it noisey snow).

I love the east. I love the west.

However, the best skiers I have ever had the pleasure of chasing down a hill were for the most part raised in the East and transplanted out West.
post #35 of 55
Another thought ...

Very many of our best racers grew up skiing on those small hills in the east.
Short hills/lifts translate to more mileage in the gates and less wasted time actually skiing the rest of the hill, with all that fluffy snow in the way, to get to the race course.
post #36 of 55
this topic never fails to catch the fish.

it's all good.

give me my far west coast glop, er, powder, and i are a happy skeeeer.
post #37 of 55
So, 209AZ, to clarify, the difference between the east and west is how you see the rivalry. I think that's the message everyone wanted to send to you over there. See what you stirred up? Skiing is fun, even in the midwest. But please don't book a ski trip to Cleveland based on that statement. I do think you will be disappointed with our 200 feet of vertical (no, I did not mean meters, it is really 200 feet and no I don't think we are the best skiers in the country, but we do work on our drills alot).
post #38 of 55
Who cares who's best? If we're havin' fun with a snow plow (wedge for you youngins) then that's all that counts. This sport is about FUN. Leave the competition to the race course is what I say, dagnabbit.
post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredat40
But please don't book a ski trip to Cleveland based on that statement. I do think you will be disappointed with our 200 feet of vertical (no, I did not mean meters, it is really 200 feet and no I don't think we are the best skiers in the country, but we do work on our drills alot).
After learning to ski at Boston Mills and Brandywine in the 60s and early 70s, including old-school instructing. Bear in mind that Tiger (Boston Mills) was once a challenge, that led to the "big" hills in PA, NY and New England. After school in Utah, eventually ended up in California within 1/2 hour of Tahoe. I thought the Eastern ice prepared me well.

I still have very fond memories of where I learned to ski in spite of its lack of vertical, big crowds and terrible weather, but will say, there are more lines out here that I cannot overcome mentally, than back East.
post #40 of 55
Thread Starter 
Wow,looks like I,ve poked a stick into a hornets nest here !.All I wanted to clarify was this "ski x is good for the west" and "ski y is good for the east",thing.

I had no idea that there existed a sort of rivary between them.

As a relative newcomer to skiing,I want to buy my own skis this year and so trawl through the reviews to see which ski might suit me.I often see this reference to east or west so just wanted to find a ski which has good reviews.

I know the best thing to do is demo the skis,but this is not so easy on a weeks holiday to the alps.Anyway,being a skinflint,I was going to see what I could get off Ebay.So far i have seen,Atomic C9's,Atomic 9.18 Ladies which seem extraordinarily cheap compared to the mens version.My thinking being ,womens a bit softer flexing so might be the equivalent of an 8 and I might be able to move the bindings to wherever they are in the mens version and hey presto,a pair of Atomics for not a lot.

The SX7/8 seem to be a good alrounder.

Bit of a minefield this skiing game !
post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by 209AZ
Wow,looks like I,ve poked a stick into a hornets nest here !.All I wanted to clarify was this "ski x is good for the west" and "ski y is good for the east",thing.

I had no idea that there existed a sort of rivary between them.

As a relative newcomer to skiing,I want to buy my own skis this year and so trawl through the reviews to see which ski might suit me.I often see this reference to east or west so just wanted to find a ski which has good reviews.

I know the best thing to do is demo the skis,but this is not so easy on a weeks holiday to the alps.Anyway,being a skinflint,I was going to see what I could get off Ebay.So far i have seen,Atomic C9's,Atomic 9.18 Ladies which seem extraordinarily cheap compared to the mens version.My thinking being ,womens a bit softer flexing so might be the equivalent of an 8 and I might be able to move the bindings to wherever they are in the mens version and hey presto,a pair of Atomics for not a lot.

The SX7/8 seem to be a good alrounder.

Bit of a minefield this skiing game !
You have no idea! You've just poked another hornets nest!:
post #42 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
The ability to ski more frequently is certainly a factor in improving skill.
Yes.

Miles under the feet are key. Thousands and thousands of miles.
post #43 of 55
This may give you real perspective on East V West

Teaching in VT, ME For a total of 8 seasons on the "loud Powder" I was able to wear just a baseball cap and sunnies aprox 10 days out of an average seson. Oh yeah pluss an ass warmer.

Teaching in Colorado for the past 8 seasons I think maybe 10 days out of the season I could not wear just a baseball cap and sunnies. Oh yeah and gallons of sun screen.

GET IT!!!
post #44 of 55
I grew up and skied the northeast for 25 years and then skied Aspen, CO for about 10 years and moved to Lake Tahoe area December 2003.

EAST
  • moist cold worse (than dry or arid cold in West)
  • boiler plate ice
  • very hard pack and great place to learn to handle that and to race
  • powder is rare if nonexistent compared to the West
  • grey days
  • smaller mountains
  • less pretty IMHO
  • bumps are nothing compared to the West. I thought I was a good bump skier growing up in the Northeast U.S. I came out West and felt like a chimp or chump (you choose) on the big bumps here
  • longer ski season. Last year in Tahoe I skied from early December to May 2
WEST
  • the opposite of the East above
  • I will never ski the northeast ever again unless I have to visit for a wedding, birth, or funeral
post #45 of 55
i will always maintain the belief that everyone should grow up skiing on the east coast, then move out west. nothing like 60 below weather and boilerplate ice to perfect your technique. west coast and rm skiers have the luxury of skiing on snow thats soft (even on groomers!!) and flip their lid when they hit what they call ice (what we easteners would call groomed or hard-pack). ill stick up for an east coaster anyday of the week compared to some west coast hippie (im of course exaggerating, power to anyone who skis)
post #46 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mad323
i will always maintain the belief that everyone should grow up skiing on the east coast, then move out west. nothing like 60 below weather and boilerplate ice to perfect your technique. west coast and rm skiers have the luxury of skiing on snow thats soft (even on groomers!!) and flip their lid when they hit what they call ice (what we easteners would call groomed or hard-pack). ill stick up for an east coaster anyday of the week compared to some west coast hippie (im of course exaggerating, power to anyone who skis)
Agreed except had I grown up here I'd be an awesome bump skier.
post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim S
bumps are nothing compared to the West. I thought I was a good bump skier growing up in the Northeast U.S. I came out West and felt like a chimp or chump (you choose) on the big bumps here
That's an interesting statement. I've only skied a couple places out West, and I haven't been there in a long time. However, I spent a week in Steamboat years ago and while I wasn't zipper-lining mega bumps by any means, I found the small to mid-size bumps to be quite do-able.

Then I came back home and I just got my a$$ kicked all over again in the bumps. Rock-hard ice bumps with blue ice troughs are way harder for me to ski then the soft ones I've experienced out West.

Disclaimer: I am certain that if I found myself in head-high moguls either East or West I'd be looking like a total doofus.
post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF
That's an interesting statement. I've only skied a couple places out West, and I haven't been there in a long time. However, I spent a week in Steamboat years ago and while I wasn't zipper-lining mega bumps by any means, I found the small to mid-size bumps to be quite do-able.

Then I came back home and I just got my a$$ kicked all over again in the bumps. Rock-hard ice bumps with blue ice troughs are way harder for me to ski then the soft ones I've experienced out West.

Disclaimer: I am certain that if I found myself in head-high moguls either East or West I'd be looking like a total doofus.
Picture youself in a 1.3 meter wide corridor, with doors randomly spaced on either side. The downhill side is a mogul a little over head high. The uphill wall is a mogule whose top you can just reach with the tip of your ski pole. Now try to figure out how to get your ski's turned around in that corridor and pointing out one of the doors. Thats what Mount Washington's powder face looked like last time I was there...too long ago .
post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by 209AZ
I have been using reading this forum for quite a while now and have come to regard it as the font of all skiing knowledge.

However,in many threads,there is a reference to someone skiing in the East or West and the differences this makes.

As someone who lives in the UK,could you explain what these differences are so as to put certian topics into context.
Hi 209AZ from the U.K.,

East = big hills, West = mountains

(warning big file)

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/jpeg/PIA03377.jpg

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/map_item.pl

It would be something like the difference between skiing in Norway (below tree line, like Eastern North America) and the European Alps ( above tree line, like Western North America) but on a smaller scale.

The places I’ve been to in the East: Tremblant, Mont St. Anne, Le Massif, Bromont, Sutton, Jay Peak, Whiteface and in the West: Whistler, Lake Louise, Sunshine, Vail, Beaver Creek, Copper, Breckenridge, Keystone, Winter Park, Alta, Snowbird, Canyons, Park City , Deer Valley, Snow Basin. Besides the higher elevation, longer ski season, weather and the snow, the big difference for me is the wide open above tree line bowl skiing you get out west. My favourites are Parsenn Bowl at Winter Park (minus the long lines on that slow double chair), Continental Divide and Goats Eye at Sunshine and Harmony Bowl at Whistler. If you ever visit North America I would recommend Whistler, it’s the best it gets on this continent.
post #50 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
Picture youself in a 1.3 meter wide corridor, with doors randomly spaced on either side. The downhill side is a mogul a little over head high. The uphill wall is a mogule whose top you can just reach with the tip of your ski pole. Now try to figure out how to get your ski's turned around in that corridor and pointing out one of the doors. Thats what Mount Washington's powder face looked like last time I was there...too long ago .
If the moguls are that big, then they should be relatively easy to ski because they will be reasonably spaced appart. Personally I find the tight, elongated moguls much harder to handle.
post #51 of 55
Well I've never skied in the East so no comment there. But from what I've read here, seems like the East coast skiers would have to tune their skis more often.:
post #52 of 55
Any where you can ski is great in my book.
post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB
If the moguls are that big, then they should be relatively easy to ski because they will be reasonably spaced appart. Personally I find the tight, elongated moguls much harder to handle.
These bumps were tall, but spaced close together, I really felt like I was skiing in a hall. I don't know if that is their regular condition or if I just lucked out. I don't know if things have changed, but at the time the pitch was too steep for grooming machines, they had had a good year for snow, and lots of skiers to grow the bumps.

They would have been easy to ski with short skis; it's hard to turn 208 cm super-g skis around when you only have a metre and a half to do it in. Kinda like driving a transport truck on a twisty road. BTW, the 208 cm skis are for the deserted steep high-speed run just below moguls.
post #54 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
After learning to ski at Boston Mills and Brandywine in the 60s and early 70s, including old-school instructing. Bear in mind that Tiger (Boston Mills) was once a challenge, that led to the "big" hills in PA, NY and New England. After school in Utah, eventually ended up in California within 1/2 hour of Tahoe. I thought the Eastern ice prepared me well.

I still have very fond memories of where I learned to ski in spite of its lack of vertical, big crowds and terrible weather, but will say, there are more lines out here that I cannot overcome mentally, than back East.
I think that's the big difference that most folks don't get until they consider skiing those lines. I'm glad I learned in NE but, well, no further comment.
post #55 of 55
I enjoy skiing east, west and everything in between. I enjoy the challenge of east coast solid ice and moguls with frozen ice chunks. I also enjoy the challenge of west coast steep and deep. Never a bad day when skiing. Each day is different then any of the previous days.

Some of the best ski conditions is during heavy rain. Try skiing in the heavy rain sometime, snow conditions are great and you might like it.
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