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help finding the complete encyclopedia of skiing

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I have been looking for The Complete Encyclopedia of Skiing by Bob Barnes without success. I have tried to locate Snowline Press without success. Anyone know of a copy for sale or the email address of Snowline Press?

Headed to Sierra at Tahoe for a Halloween adventure, disguisesd as Davy Crockett. See you on the slopes!!

Mark evensonmk@yahoo.com
post #2 of 26
Bob Barnes is currently working on his second book. The Complete Encyclopedia of Skiingis currently out of print. You can send Bob a PM. Let me know if his PM box is full, and I'll give him a call. He may be able to send you a PDF, but I'm not sure.
Have fun at Sierra!
post #3 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
Bob Barnes is currently working on his second book.
if you are referring to the dictionary that will be the fourth edition.
post #4 of 26
OOPS! Thanks Rusty!
post #5 of 26
Look at past threads- I bought it on CD in .pdf form as recommended by someone at EpicSki earlier this year
post #6 of 26
PM me, Mkevenson. While the 3rd Edition is out of print, and the 4th Edition is well underway, but not yet finished, the completel and unabridged 3rd Edition is available on a CD-ROM in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. You can install it on your hard drive, and you can print a hard copy from that disk, if you like.

Thanks for your interest!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #7 of 26
Bob Barnes, Has anyone ever written a English dictionary of terms that define snow and all it's textures, forms or formations. I was told once by someone somewhere that the Inuit Indians of Alaska have hundreds to a thousand words for a subject that is so important to there lives.
post #8 of 26
Ritski--

I've actually spent a fair amount of time up in the Canadian Arctic, from Yukon Territory to Nunavut, and I count among my friends a number of Inuit people. I've asked them to verify that much-quoted "fact," and all I've ever gotten was a kind of knowing rolling of the eyes, as if to say, "maybe so, maybe not--but you're welcome to keep believing it!" So I still don't have any idea how many words they have for snow! (I've heard the number 52 quoted more than once.)

We skiers have quite a few ourselves, of course--snow, powder, ice, champagne, hardpack, bulletproof, death cookies, chicken heads, graupel, slush, sleet, breakable crust, windslab, corn, manmade, hail, hoar, frost, packed powder, bottomless, coral, crud, Sierra Cement, mashed potatoes, drifted, corduroy...to name a few--any others? (Perhaps we should start a running list!)

Avalanche specialists have a whole vocabulary of snow terms. If you want a real reference, you might start with avalanche information books and other resources.

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #9 of 26
Ohh Kay. I posted it before, here it is again.

You can get an electronic copy on CD-ROM from Rocky Mountain Division, PSIA. Try this link. http://www.psia-rm.org/ Go to their Products/Bookstore. Click on Alpine, scroll down and you can order it for $7.00.

I picked up my copy this way. Printed it out, put the pages in a binder, and bingo, I got my own copy. Quick, sorta easy, and you can customize it any way you want.

So, get your credit card out and do it.
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado
We skiers have quite a few ourselves, of course--snow, powder, ice, champagne, hardpack, bulletproof, death cookies, chicken heads, graupel, slush, sleet, breakable crust, windslab, corn, manmade, hail, hoar, frost, packed powder, bottomless, coral, crud, Sierra Cement, mashed potatoes, drifted, corduroy...to name a few--any others? (Perhaps we should start a running list!)
My personal favorite: sastrugi (old, windblown snow).
post #11 of 26
New England Powder. (That blue glossy stuff.)
post #12 of 26
Sastrugi, Steve? Great word--do you know its origin?

Unfortunately, T-Square, the price has gone up slightly for the CD through PSIA-RM--I believe it is now $10 plus tax and shipping. Still a GREAT deal, in my humble opinion!



Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #13 of 26
Bob, of course it is well worth it. At least until the fourth edition comes out!
post #14 of 26
For what it's worth, this thread may help contribute to the new edition of the Encyclopedia. I'll add any word for snow that seems worthy. It should be in at least somewhat wide use. Thanks!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #15 of 26
I just Googled it. http://www.sastrugi.com/ Very interesting.
post #16 of 26
You're right, T-Square--very interesting indeed! Here's a picture to go with the definition ("Sastrugi, or wind sculpted snow, are ridges formed when wind erodes and drifts the snow." --Snow.com). I've always wondered if there was a name for that phenomenon!

And another definition: Sastrugi--"A long wavelike ridge of snow, formed by the wind and found on the polar plains." (Dictionary.com, http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=sastrugi)

Steve--this one will make it into the 4th Edition. Thanks!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
My personal favorite: sastrugi (old, windblown snow).
Very common snow in Australia, and it's often the new snow. Our snow usually falls with high winds, and so you'll see fresh sastrugi evrywhere. tricky to ski, it's like crust, shaped into formations. XC skiiers hate it as it really knocks the light skis around.

Last time I skiied Utah, my friend pointed out the death cookies, chicken heads, and "those are small appliances"!!!!!
post #18 of 26
Bob,

Here's another interesting website to check out for snow types.

http://www.crrel.usace.army.mil/alas.../snoclass.html

This is a generalized system for typing snow. It doesn't have the really pretty names like sastrugi. (Sounds like a great pasta dish.)

CRREL (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory) is an Army lab that specializes in everything cold, snow, and ice. If it has to do with the cold, they have probably done it or know the guys that have done it.
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
Very common snow in Australia, and it's often the new snow. Our snow usually falls with high winds, and so you'll see fresh sastrugi evrywhere. tricky to ski, it's like crust, shaped into formations. XC skiiers hate it as it really knocks the light skis around.

Last time I skiied Utah, my friend pointed out the death cookies, chicken heads, and "those are small appliances"!!!!!
Hmmm... I've found that this snow around here is fun to ski and pretty consistent in texture. I can't remember breaking through it on skis like I do crust. Some of my favorite places to find this around here are Breck's Horseshoe bowl after a windy storm and South Chutes at Loveland.

It can be funky, though. Any snow is fun as long as I don't take it seriously!
post #20 of 26
We have 'breakleg crust" here too, but I don't know how common the term is in the general population (who wouldn't be caught skiing any kind of crust).
post #21 of 26

World's worst name!

Thanks for the link to CRREL, T-Square. I haven't had a chance to look it over thoroughly yet, but I think I may have come across the world's worst name on that site: Peter Semen. (I'm not kidding: http://www.crrel.usace.army.mil/news/news.htm; "Peter Semen, Dr. Charles Korhonen, and Dr. Raymond Rollings, ERDC-CRREL low-temperature concrete and pavements researchers, received a letter of appreciation from MG L. Dean Fox, the Air Force Civil Engineer....")

He should really change his name to, oh, I don't know, "Dick," or something.



Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritski
Bob Barnes, Has anyone ever written a English dictionary of terms that define snow and all it's textures, forms or formations. I was told once by someone somewhere that the Inuit Indians of Alaska have hundreds to a thousand words for a subject that is so important to there lives.
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...1&page=1&pp=30

It's just a list, not a dictionary, but it's a place to start.

Tom / PM

PS - I see there have been quite a few new entries after my last post in that thread. I guess I better update the list.
post #23 of 26
Thanks for the link, Tom! I never noticed that thread before. Wow--176 names and counting....

For what it's worth, I believe that that technically correct term for #28 ("chokable") is "chokinonit" (I read an article about it once--really!) And as for #154, I'd have to say that "tracked-up" and "untracked" should count as two different kinds of snow!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all for the help. Sierra at Tahoe was beautiful, snow a bit crusty and icy in places but had a great time and worked on some technique. As I start my second season (and early too) I have a lot to work on. Thanks for all the help in these forums.
Mark
post #25 of 26
Bob,

While I was stationed at CRREL as the Navy Liaison Officer the front office secretary was Carol Burr. She always answered the phone, "Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, this is Carol." For some reason she didn't think answering the phone, "Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, this is Mrs. Burr." was quite the way to do it.
post #26 of 26
Death cookies- chunks of ice that are not broken up by groomers.
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