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Honda in the Mountains

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I'm looking for some info about a Honda Civic in the mountains. I would like to make trips from Denver, mostly to Keystone and A-basin, but am kind of skeptical on how my car will handle the mountains. Thanks for any input.
post #2 of 11
Get snow tires, and carry chains. Educate yourself about winter travel and don't take foolish chances.
post #3 of 11
Don't know how the roads compare, but I've been driving a Civic the last five years in Banff with only all seasons and never had a problem. Only difficulty is when it pukes cause the car sits so low. Never had a traction or braking problem. Hope this helps.
post #4 of 11
FWD cars actually work great in the snow with a reasonable driver and good tires. AWD/4WD isn't necessary on public roads, stupid flashing signs notwithstanding. If you do encounter a hill so steep that the vehicle won't ascend it with good tires, try backing up it.

SUVs annoy me, and I see more of them in the ditch than anything else.
post #5 of 11
Keep i mind that no car stops on ice. That's where the biggest problem is. Go at a reasonable speed, give yourself room between cars and pack some survival gear in case you do get stuck. Sleeping bag, water, food, etc.
post #6 of 11
I-70 and most of the main roads to the resorts are well maintained. Most of the year I used to run a Z24 with Z rated tires all the way to Vail from my house in Washington Park. A few instances the white stuff was dumping and I took the Bronco, but honestly, the roads are rarely REAL bad (barring a BIG storm).


Any car with good snow tires will get there eventually.
post #7 of 11
We have a Prelude. Great with snow tires. Trecherous without.
post #8 of 11
Park the Honda downtown....
Take the train to WP

Park the Honda at DIA...
Take a plane to Aspen

Ski more - drive less
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by thexcop
Park the Honda at DIA...
Take a plane to Aspen
bwahahahahahahahaha

Not in my tax bracket. Or, I would stereotypically guess, in the tax bracket of someone driving a Civic.
post #10 of 11
For I-70 just about anything works.

I drive a '92 maxima with all weather tires. Generally speaking, it is a god-awful snow driver. I bring chains along just in case- but I have never needed them on I-70. The only time I am scaed is when the idiots in their SUVs think they can go 60mph on ice. I dont know weather to laugh or cry when I see them climbing out of their flipped vehicles.
post #11 of 11
I put 250,000 miles on Honda cars in the mountain west and never had a problem except when snow depth or ruts thereof exceeded clearance on chassis. Incredibly reliable vehicle. Use studded snows on all four corners if you're real worried, but the new generation of soft/hard studless tires like Bridgestone Blizzak or Yokohama Guardex give better control on everything, plus are a lot quieter, only negative is stopping distance on ice is a little longer than studded. Keep some cable chains on hand for getting out of the ditch or parking spot. Get new wipers every season with snow-covers to inhibit buildup. Good Luck.
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