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post #1 of 17
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Edited by comprex - 4/19/11 at 6:37pm
post #2 of 17
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Edited by comprex - 4/19/11 at 6:37pm
post #3 of 17
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Edited by comprex - 4/19/11 at 6:38pm
post #4 of 17
Honestly guy, I would'nt loose sleep over it. In fact, your waisting your time. It's equivalent to analyzing the wear on your car tires, and being worried that the inside part of your tire is more worn than than the center part of your front left tire. IT DOESNT MATTER. If your not racing, and you cant tell the difference while your skiing, your waisting your time.

Spend $25 and get those babies stoneground and dont give it a second thought!

post #5 of 17
PZM, tire wear is much easier to analyze, and should be watched. But that's a topic for a different forum.

I do agree with you. Get the skis to a shop and have them looked at by the experts and most likely stone ground.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by comprex:
The skis in question are 184cm long, All-Mountain design, with a 103/60/90 profile, moderately stiff, with at least one titanium top sheet.

The edges are somewhat nicked and work-hardened, as would be expected for a ski used for a full season. (Actually one week at Copper only). Except that there is _no_ damage past approx. 80mm ski width! That's right, not a single rock skip, edge burr, or edge impact. Nada.

Further, closer examination of the base reveals significant dent damage in the P-tex within 2 cm of the edge. The center of the ski is untouched.
Sounds like a typical wear pattern for a strong carver, although the skis might be a bit soft if as you say there is no damage to the edges other than in the middle of the ski. The base damage is often refered to as "base burn" and if you check carefully the base at the edges may now be a hair below the level of the edges in the affected region.

For a good idea of the typical wear area take a look at a pair of Atomic C11's (Atomic's top carving ski), they have a ceramic base insert to fight the base wear in that region, and the insert pretty closely matches the region of wear I get on my skis (not C11's)

Rick
post #7 of 17
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Edited by comprex - 4/19/11 at 6:38pm
post #8 of 17
OK, I'll bite, why are you getting such wear in only one weeks worth of skiing. I ski 60 plus days a season and maybe get a stone grind once may be twice a season. Usually after I get a large nick in the base that I can't P-Tex my self.
post #9 of 17
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Edited by comprex - 4/19/11 at 6:39pm
post #10 of 17
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Edited by comprex - 4/19/11 at 6:39pm
post #11 of 17
Over analyzing was my first thought. I have noticed that some times I get a little drying out under the binding area. When I notice that, it's time to wax. Please don't make this more then a fun sport. Skis really don't need a lot of maintenance. Unless your a dedicated racer, for most of us sharp edges and a all temp wax is good enought. All my skis have some sort of nicks and gouges in the base. The structure is not perfect. Does it matter, No. The skis feel fine when they're on my feet going down the hill. I'm haviing a good time with little up keep.
post #12 of 17
Sorry it took me so long to bite on this one... but the wear that the base of the ski described is experiencing is very normal. There are several reasons for this kind of wear to occurr. If the skis are not maintained properly they will do this. It is very common to get serious base burn near the edges of a ski and actually have the base and edge wear away. If the skier is a good skier they have their skis constantly on edge, then they arent using the middle of the ski, and only the edge receives the serious wear. The reason this happened after only a week of being skied on is probably the lack of wax in or on the base and it just dried out. If they were skied for an 8 hour day, for 7 days, they should have received a few wax jobs during that time period, especially when on the feet of an aggressive fast skier. If a ski is not base ground for several seasons you will find that this type of wear is normal, and you get a section near the edge of the ski that is almost white and when examined under a magnifying glass looks like the base has just been shredded into a fuzzy plastic material. Get the skis a base grind, and then wax them several times after you get the grind, even if they claim to have hot waxed the skis. Hot wax and scrape, and repeat the process 3 or 4 times, and then hot wax a final time, let it set up, scrape and brush your base, and you should have a good amount of wax worked into the base with a good prtective coating to start skiing on. If you are planning on racing on the skis, do the wax and scrape process about 9 times with LF wax and then use HF wax for the final coat.
Later
GREG
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by HeluvaSkier:
If you are planning on racing on the skis, do the wax and scrape process about 9 times with LF wax and then use HF wax for the final coat.
Later
GREG
9 times with LF? : riiiight. I wax once with CH man, and I think the $6 they charge for that is a rip. Do you guys have time to waste and money to burn or something? I mean, who actually buys the HF or LF anyway- wayyy too expensive stuff. Next time your gonna go waste all that money, send some my way.

[img]tongue.gif[/img]

[ November 25, 2003, 02:05 PM: Message edited by: PMZ ]
post #14 of 17
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Edited by comprex - 4/19/11 at 6:40pm
post #15 of 17
That 9 times is only a one time thing, when the bases are fresh and have no wax in them at all. I do this with all my skis, and then i wax them every time or at least every other time i ski on them. It really doesnt take too much wax. I have to 900g race pack of LF, a small amount of HF, and a huge amount of different temp CH waxes (900g+), which are what i use for training and free skiing. You can wax 9 times with the CH wax as well, but use a warm weather wax because it will melt and soak in easier, resulting in a faster base with more wax in it. When you wax your bases you arent just putting wax on them, you actually soak the wax into them. To avoid serious base burn like you described, this process will work nicely. For my GS skis it is a must, since they run on their bases more often than my slalom skis. The slalom skis get more love in the edge tuning department than they do in the wax department. Of course i never let them get any kind of base burn, but when i wax them it is usually very quick with only one wax depending on the forecast.
Later
GREG
post #16 of 17
Thanks Greg, I'll look to keep both the skis in question and my new ones waxed better.

Owner of said skis
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by PMZ:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by HeluvaSkier:
If you are planning on racing on the skis, do the wax and scrape process about 9 times with LF wax and then use HF wax for the final coat.
Later
GREG
9 times with LF? : riiiight. I wax once with CH man, and I think the $6 they charge for that is a rip. Do you guys have time to waste and money to burn or something? I mean, who actually buys the HF or LF anyway- wayyy too expensive stuff. Next time your gonna go waste all that money, send some my way.

[img]tongue.gif[/img]
</font>[/quote]PMZ

I can see you have not had the pleasure of being a race parent.

I use all temp Dominator Hyper Zoom it's a LF wax. I love the way the ski glide on run outs and flat traverses. As much as I ski it's well worth it. I have had people ask me if I use LF as I pass them on a traverse.

I can understand if your don't ski every weekend. I have enough wax in the skis so I don't wax but every 5 or 6 ski day's.

As for waxing race skis. You will want to start waxing in Aug. to get enough wax in the bases for Dec races.
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