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Summit Daily Fitness Misconceptions

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I never thought I would see it happen here, but last week, the Summit Daily printed one of the worst articles on ski-fitness I've seen in a long time. Since I offered to write the same sort of article for free, I will readily admit to being sour grapes. But my goodness, if you're going to have a staff writer do an article, can't you at least use a fact checker?

The reporter interviewed trainers from the Breck and Silverthorne Rec centers. Ironically, many of the students at my studio are members at the rec centers. They've taken the ski-fitness classes and incurred serious injury. Now I understand why.

Unfortunately, the original article is no longer online, but they did print my letter to the editor:
http://summitdaily.com/article/20041...TTER/110120010

Hopefully, from my content, you can infer what was written.
post #2 of 23
my prediction is that you will be well known in your new environs faster'n you might've imagined.

**************************

btw...

http://www.summitdaily.com/apps/pbcs...ORTS/110030013
post #3 of 23
I read your letter in the paper today Lisa--good work! Like Ryan says, you'll be famous, around here in short order!

If the Summit Daily News was EpicSki, I'd pour myself a Manhattan with Ott and sit back to watch the fireworks. Way to stir up trouble--you go, girl!



Bob Barnes
post #4 of 23
This is going to be more fun to watch than PMTS vs "the gang".
post #5 of 23
Cheers Mark! Come on over--I'll get some chips...
post #6 of 23
Quote"MarkXSThis is going to be more fun to watch than PMTS vs "the gang"."
End Quote


In the immortal word of Rodney King, "Can't we all just, get along?"

I've followed some of the threads. Boy can you guys get going. I'm learning from them though.
post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 
Famous, but perhaps in a rather controversial way! So what else is new? If anything else, it may provide some entertainment at our party on the 23rd, if the Sox don't make it to the Series!
post #8 of 23
Good for you, LM, for being professional! It made the other article sound like it was written by grade schoolers without a clue!

That was the best advertising you could buy. BAM! You're off!
post #9 of 23
Way to go LM. You do good letter!
post #10 of 23
Good job, Lisa. Hopefully, the St. Louis Cardinals will be in the series! Will there be any other Cardinal fans at your party?
post #11 of 23
What can you expect from a newspaper that prints a section on Horoscopes?
post #12 of 23
Coincidently -- or not so considering that now is the time that people think of these things -- there was an article in today's Salt Lake Trib about exactly the same thing. In this case its two guys preparing for the upcongin season, so kind of a light-hearted approach. But their regime so far does not sound promising. "5 days in the gym, rotating between upper body and lower body strenght training. 300 (!) situps a day."

Thankyou, thankyou, thanks you LM for letting me know that I won't have to do 300 %$#$# pushups a day!! I like how you take on the conventional wisdom. Can I tell my wife now that it is a good-thing that I can barely touch my toes?

Though I have to disagree a bit on one issue -- Yoga, done properly, is very good at developing deep core stregth and (static at least) balance, on top of just feeeling more "planted" in your body. I think doing Yoga really improved my skiing though I don't have the opportunity of inclination to practice right now. Yoga != mindless stretching.

Anyway, perhaps you can write a letter to the SLTrib as well, they seem very open to input:

http://www.sltrib.com/outdoors/ci_2427165

OK, not that I would have anyway done 300 situps anyway; my pre season training is so far limited to strenuous hiking and trail running with the dogs (something these guys also reccomend whcih is nice!)

This has almost certainly been discussed before, but what in a nutshell is the simplest dynamic core strengthening approach to take? Are there a fairly straightforward set of PhysioBall excercies that one could do?
post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
Lodro, check out this set of stability ball exercises;
http://www.performbetter.com/catalog/matriarch/MultiPiecePage.asp_Q_PageID_E_132_A_PageName_E_sta bilityballexercises&c1=PB-email&source=newsletterOct04&kw=SB-Exer-Sheet-Link

One of my problems with yoga is that many of the wrong people practice it. Of the , it's the girls who have so much flexibility that they have no stability or muscle tone that are into it.

As far as the 300 situp/pushup routine goes, here's the condensed version about my own experience with learning to ski;

When I was outrageously fit, lifting weights six days a week, teaching fitness for 5 hours a day and running marathons, I could not stand up for one moment on skis without falling. Now, even snowboarders running wild can't knock me over! Strength, cardio and flexibility without balance will do liitle for your ski fitness.

Nancy, not sure if there are any Cardinals fans. I know that we have two avid Red Sox fans. For me, being raised in NYC, but lived in Brookline for 9 years, I'm split.

But when the Yanks play the Sox, I like to cheer for the Yankees just to annoy some people!
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by PVnRT
What can you expect from a newspaper that prints a section on Horoscopes?
Hey! The Summit Daily is a top little paper. I used to get quite growly if all teh issues were gone from the little stands as I stamped across the carpark from my bedroom to work every morning. Summit Up is addictive, and the cartoons were good, there was a weekly one with some yucky young guys in it that was hilarious.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
Lodro, check out this set of stability ball exercises;
Cool!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
One of my problems with yoga is that many of the wrong people practice it. Of the , it's the girls who have so much flexibility that they have no stability or muscle tone that are into it.
Like anything, I think it depends more on who is teaching it. The whole process of Yoga is a balance of balanced strength and flexibility and you can't have one without the other. There are many half-assed approaches to Yoga esp. -- like noodles competing to see how deep they can get in a pose -- but you can develop incredible tone (not bulk of course) -- the serious women pratitioners I have seen have beautiful tone -- like long distance swinmmers.
post #16 of 23
Quote:

But when the Yanks play the Sox, I like to cheer for the Yankees just to annoy some people!
Lisa!! Shame on you!!!

a question about stability balls- I have noticed that (especially when I go to the gym late in the evening) sometimes the balls are somewhat underinflated. My impression is that the excercises lose quite a bit of their value under these conditions, since the ball is so squishy that it adds more stability- you just sink into the ball more. True?
post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
YEP. One of the problems in the gym is that they lose air pretty quickly, and the trainers don't inflate them. I have noticed that the ones in my studio are deflating very quickly, even though they get less use than they would in a large gym. Altitude related?
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
YEP. One of the problems in the gym is that they lose air pretty quickly, and the trainers don't inflate them. I have noticed that the ones in my studio are deflating very quickly, even though they get less use than they would in a large gym. Altitude related?
hmmm...possible but maybe PhysicsMan has something to say..? It is true theoretically that higher altitude == lower air pressure, but the relative pressure differential would seem to me to be the same -- that is isn't it the delta of air pressure that matters here, in which case they would be equivalent for a given relative pressure regardless of absolute pressure? Obviously talking out of my ass here.
post #19 of 23
I too take exception to blaming yoga for ACL tears.

First off, I have to disclose my partiality in this area: my wife & I are co-owners of a yoga studio (shameless plug: ParkCityYogaCenter.com).

Weak Ham to Quad ratios are not a result of yoga, poor muscle training is. Incorrectly performed yoga can exacerbate this weakness, but is not the cause of it. BTW there are may types of yoga, some of which actually build muscle strength and reverse poor Ham to Quad ratios. So, to lump yoga as a purely stretching excersize is inaccurate.

We see many gifted atheletes in our studio (Park City is home to the US Ski, Snowboard & Nordic teams) that do not reach peak perfomance without this essential element of overall fitness.

Powdr
post #20 of 23
LM...

we've shared chats about fitness and skiing before so I wanted to add a comment or two.

yoga
two years ago I joined a small studio because I wanted to learn to practice yoga properly. it really helped my core strength, flexibility and separation of upper and lower body - which is critical for skiing. these days I think a yoga class a week is perfect... even if it's just for my mental health!

balance skills
this is something I have been working on for a couple of years... I now stand on the bosu's hard plastic platform while doing most of my upper body weight work. the other day I was using a different location of my gym and I couldn't find a bosu - I did find this hard plastic platform with a beveled underside called a "balance board"... it was MORE difficult - however, I managed to find balance on it. I'd love to know why I was able (in a few tries) to figure out how to balance on this... balance begets balance?

http://www.shapeupshop.com/balance/rocker.htm this is the board - it's for KIDS! hahaha... oh well it was damn hard for me to stand steadily balanced and then do free weights.

plyometrics
it's been drilled into my head that while plyo exercises are soooooo good for you - the exercise regimine is meant to slowly ramp up and peak mid ski season (february?). I think this is important to keep in mind when ski training. I have seen no mention of this concept anywhere.

what else are we still missing, LM?
kiersten
post #21 of 23
Thread Starter 
It's not so much yoga itself, it's the misguided concept that as much flexibility as possible is healthy for every athlete. Far too often, amateurish teachers of all modes of fitness wrongly assume a lack of flexibility in one area, when it's actually coming from someplace else. {as in my example of the hamstrings}

The missing link in many fitness modalities is the words "dynamic" and "transitional." This can apply to many aspects of fitness. You might be able to stand on one leg for an hour, chanting 'om shanti' and contemplating the deeper significance of navel lint, but can you keep that balance as you move from turn to turn. Some yoga practices promote this. Others don't.

The same applies to flexibility. You may be able to hold a lotus position and become a human prezle, but how fluid are your transitions on the hill?

Kiersten asks what else is missing? Postural analysis. At ESA 2003, I did an analysis of some of the participants postural alignment. It was amazing how many correlations we found between misalignments and ski technique. Once you understand that, it's rteally important that you figure out why the misalignment is happening. It's not just a question of saying "stand up straight.'' Why aren't you standing up straight? What muscles are hypertonic? What muscles are hypotonic? If someone is already extremely lordotic, do you have them hold a cobra postion for half an hour?:

BTW, a few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of meeting Jeff Bergeronof Boot Fixation in Breckenridge. jeff and I are on the same page in terms of looking at the entire body to figure out where an alignment problem is coming from, rather than just looking at the "site of the crash." By coincidence, many of his clints are my students. Apparently, they hear the same things from me as they do from him!

Pilates training is about dynamic flexibility, alignment, strength and balance.
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
Kiersten asks what else is missing? Postural analysis. At ESA 2003, I did an analysis of some of the participants postural alignment. It was amazing how many correlations we found between misalignments and ski technique. Once you understand that, it's rteally important that you figure out why the misalignment is happening. It's not just a question of saying "stand up straight.'' Why aren't you standing up straight? What muscles are hypertonic? What muscles are hypotonic? If someone is already extremely lordotic, do you have them hold a cobra postion for half an hour?:
In most serious yogic traditions -- such as ashtanga -- posture and alignment are the absolute number one issue. LisaMarie, I can't help but think that you've been exposed to some very poor yoga teachers/studios.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodro
In most serious yogic traditions -- such as ashtanga -- posture and alignment are the absolute number one issue. LisaMarie, I can't help but think that you've been exposed to some very poor yoga teachers/studios.
Agreed Lodro! My personal experience with extensive yoga study/practice was only positive to my skiing. Disciplined posture/alignment focus with the corresponding body awareness/control were huge for me - and I can personally say that physically, my long term practice was comparable to a martial arts study - poise/accuracy/balance were forever integrated into my skiing. I continue to reap the benefits today. The breathing awareness and internal "centeredness" were arguably an even greater benefit - to be present.

With that said, I did not study flexibility; I practiced yoga. Did I become more flexible? Sure. Ultimately, the transformation from yoga on my "being" had a deeper fundamental impact on my skiing. (And my humanness.) At the time, I was training as a competitive alpine racer.

As with any discipline, the quality of teacher guides the understanding and benefit.

May I suggest a classic book -
"The Complete Illustrated Book of Yoga" Swami Vishnudevenanda
Out of print, but very worthwhile to find.
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