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Life in a Ski Town - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
Maybe, maybe not. When the "masses" find out stuff like not getting their mail at their door, they might change their tune. You don't read about that in ski.
You're right, but those are the same people who move in, and then try to make their new home area match their old home area. I see this every day where I live now. I'm in a rural area of the fastest growing county in the US. I'm amazed at the number of people who move into my neighborhood and then complain that we don't have streetlights and sidewalks, and it's 6 miles to the closest grocery store. It's not like they didn't know this before they moved in.:
post #32 of 49

easy solution

The MountainTown-Worthy Olympics


The core residents can administer a barrage of tests aimed at gauging the worthiness of all newbies. If they drive the wrong vehicles, have the wrong pets, say the wrong things, wear the wrong clothes, vote the wrong way, come from the wrong place (anywhere else), walk with the wrong gait, drink the wrong beer/coffee/wine, ski the wrong skis (don't even bring up boarding), BOOM, they're voted off the proverbial island.
post #33 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan
The MountainTown-Worthy Olympics


The core residents can administer a barrage of tests aimed at gauging the worthiness of all newbies. If they drive the wrong vehicles, have the wrong pets, say the wrong things, wear the wrong clothes, vote the wrong way, come from the wrong place (anywhere else), walk with the wrong gait, drink the wrong beer/coffee/wine, ski the wrong skis (don't even bring up boarding), BOOM, they're voted off the proverbial island.
Maybe I should start working on the old cheat sheet.
post #34 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
Maybe, maybe not. When the "masses" find out stuff like not getting their mail at their door, they might change their tune. You don't read about that in ski.


So, LM, have you discovered the twilight zone you'll be relegated to when you try to explain to some big corporation's call center employee that you only have a P O Box?

And then they'll say "But we need your physical address".

And I'll say "Why?".

And they say "For our records."

And then I say,

"I do HAVE a physical address because we have to have one for 911 records, but if you try to send mail to my physical address it'll get returned, so don't try to send my (phone, cable, internet, insurance, brokerage, etc.) bill to my physical address or I'll never see it and you'll think I'm a deadbeat because I haven't paid my bill but, honest, it never got to me because you INSISTED on getting a physical address even though I TOLD you that you can't send mail to it and you keyed it in as my mailing address anyway because your company's freakin' database software is too STOOPID to recognize the possibility that someone could exist in the United States with ONLY a post office box."

Sigh.

Life in a ski town. It's fantastic.

Bob
post #35 of 49
LM,

unfortunately, the Gomers don't try to decide whether or how they will fit in. they just move there and start demanding modern conveniences. because they USUALLY move with a nice nest egg from sale of their old house in the expensive town they lived in, they throw money around and start talking to local pols. if enough of the Gomers move in, the town character changes.

You can disagree with me and I won't hold it against you. I just think you are unaware of the real affects of such articles. I've watched Missoula change radically in a short 5-year period. I'm sure most of the recent immigrants thought they were going to "fit in" just fine. But they have "fit in" by demanding asphalt paving everywhere, more street lights, fancier stores, etc. And the town is giving them those things, because these newbies arrive with money, and the town fathers like the increased tax revenue base.

There really isn't any way to write such an article to be sure that it tells the whole story. Nobody wants to hear that THEY are the vector of a town becoming McBoulder. I think that's ryan's point with his sarcastic post about the olympics of skitown residency.

Whether one fits into the community really is a question of "do you like the town the way it is now, and will you try to change it to make it like the town you left?" But you can't ask that question both academically and sincerely. Most folks are unlikely to consider the thing truthfully.
post #36 of 49
Gonz,

ya know, really where i'm coming from is the position of an urbanite who will at some point plop his cityass down in a mountain town, because that's the life i want. (and yes, my periscope twists toward spots mostly unknown to or at least uncoveted by, for example only, folks looking for the next breckenridge or telluride, etc.) i DO understand wanting to protect what's right and good and precious, and i DO see your p.o.v. very clearly.

by the way, a friend who went to the telluride bluegrass festival earlier in the summer brought back some brochures and magazines all about telluride. for one, a scan through this stuff makes it clear that telluride is a place i'm light-years away from being able to afford. (heck, from the looks of it, telluride is more aspen than aspen.) (my take is that a gathering of movie stars and/or the exorbitantly monied in a ski town is generally not a good sign; but to each his/her own.)

also, and i don't mean to step on toes, i get a sense of a particular "mountain town" vibe i'd really not want any part of, and i think it DOES have to do with what can happen to a place when half the "residents" are there maybe two months a year, or less.

anyway, get used to it. with more and more of the last of the boomers cashing out and suddenly able to afford what they might've thought they never could, more and more mountain outposts will be the receptacles for these people. still, some of "us" want what you have for the same honorable reasons; some of us may even bring something good, something that adds rather than takes away.
post #37 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan
some of "us" want what you have for the same honorable reasons; some of us may even bring something good, something that adds rather than takes away.
The Low-Rider Capital of the U.S.A.:
http://www.espanolaonline.com/
post #38 of 49
Thread Starter 
You do have some good points, Ryan. One of the things you need to be willing to do, is fight for what you believe in. I'm usually not politically active, but I had to confront the harsh realities, when I joined the chamber, and spoke of my difficulties with the planning board. Not surprisingly, they've dealt with this issue quite frequently. The problem happens when someone starts a new business that is in line with what fits with the town. They are happy and mellow about it. Maybe they join the chamber, maybe they don't. But even if they do, they are not active, until one day they find out that the planning board has made a decision that favors a big box business over theirs. Then they come crying to the chamber, but it's too late. The chamber had been asking them to be active about these issues for awhile. Ironically, some, but not all of the people who work on te planning board are the very antithesis of what the town is trying to be about. We're talking six inch high heels in a mountain town, make up so thick you could build condos with it, and, you've been living here how long, and you still have not lost that annoyingly nasal, whiny east coast accent?
post #39 of 49
The J-Deluxe knows I have my long-distance peepers on New Mexico.
Shhhhhhhhhh, don't tell anyone. It's mine mine all mine.
post #40 of 49
ryan, I am not delusional, I know this is going to happen. The issue for me is, how fast and with what types of people.

Folks who respect an area's identity and individuality get my support every time. Folks who move to an area because of its "image" or suchlike can stay the fork away, as far as I'm concerned. Can I stop them? Not directly. Can I conduct myself in a way that dissuades them? Maybe. Can I get involved in local politics to try to add some balance? YES.

Ultimately this is about people and their dreams. What's really an issue is that the dream often departs heavily from reality. All I'm asking, really, is that people use their noggins and try to be holistic about viewing their potential new mountain town home. Not selfish. Holistic.
post #41 of 49
That suggestion was only partially in jest... in the 100 or so times I've driven through Espanola, I never actually turned off Route 84 and looked around. All I remember are the Blakes Lotaburger and Sonic restaurants on that ugly stretch of road, and thinking... "keep driving."

But the location is outstanding -- minutes to Pajarito, maybe 30 to Ski Santa Fe, a little more to Taos, Sipapu, Angel Fire, and Red River... and if you want to take part in that goofy annual march to Chimayo, you're there.

And once you're there, you can start improving it!
post #42 of 49
Ryan your late. My husband and I have been thinking New Mexico.
post #43 of 49
In post thirteen, I was trying to keep the place secret. I guess the word is out. By the way, not to hijack this post, but how long a drive from Red River to Santa Fe.
post #44 of 49
I would love to move to a ski town to get out of the city.

I have lived in Boston my whole life but would love to drive on dirt roads and have a pickup instead of driving an SUV in traffic.

I like friendly people and I like being friendly.

Unfortunately I don't think I could afford my school loans and other bills with a lower salary because the cost of living is not that much lower. There is plenty I can live without if I moved and I would hate to have a ski town be the same as where I moved from.
post #45 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
Thanks. I'd also like to hear about areas in Canada and Europe.
Lisa I lived in Aspen in the mid 80's, Vail in the mid 90's, and moved to Tremblant, Quebec 4 years ago. An American moving to this area that doesn't speak any french has been colorful to say the least. Check you PM's
post #46 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason
Denver is a good hour away from summit county.

But isn't Salt Lake like 1/2 hour from lots of ski resorts?

Couldn't one live near 80 in Salt Lake and kinda have it both ways? Like a normal job/house/expenses, but still ski easily whenever wanted?
Hey John,

Actually, depending on where we're specifically referring to, Denver-I70-Summit County is closer to 1.5-2 hours, of course that's when the road is clear...

It's a fairly long story; I grew up around Cleveland and mostly Cincinnati, left in my late teens, pursued the classic vocation/location issues/SNAFU's/solutions literally all over half of the western hemisphere, for most of my adult (I use the term loosely) life and livelihood.

While living in SoCal, after my first several month visit to the Salt Lake City area in 1983 and winter '84, the main reasons that I decided to move here were more or less what you and others have mentioned. It wasn't and isn't easy - I moved here in 1990, incurring significant but calculated career risk and sacrifice. It took until about 1997-'98 to become a homeowner and really make it stick. Some folks here on this thread, as well as some other directly relevant threads, have made some sharp points based on experienced observation and dues well paid. I won't bore you with any of my reiteration. Fortunately, I've been one of those lucky enough to work it out - believe me, it's still work, but worth it on a number of levels.

To answer your question, in a word: yes...!...

See you on the hill...

Smiles,

Dave
post #47 of 49
Paradise can be a moving target. When I first got to Utah in the early 90's I was struck by how poor it was. The fanciest car I remember seeing was a Cadillac. I liked it that way.
Now I'm trippin' over Benzes. The local ranchers can't wait to sell out to developers. In the six or seven years prior to the Olympics the feeding frenzy was amazing. That's why home prices jumped in 1994 and then stayed flat for a decade. We've got these big developments all over Summit county for giant second homes built around golf courses. All built and sold by locals. Water? what water? O.K. enough rant.

Utah is still a bargain compared to Colarado and especially California. Park City is becoming as much an upscale bedroom community of Salt Lake as a ski town- much of it's rebirth after the mining bust was due to Delta pilots anyway.
Many of the old time ski town people, if they didn't set down roots with a business, were heading north or east(Vt.- N.H.) when I bummed here ten years ago. That's not to say it's ruined here by a long shot- just different. There was a time when I wanted no schools and no cops. Things change.
It's still out there. But the old towns are changing. My brother has lived in Eagle Co. thirty years- doesn't even ski. Very active on local boards and politics at least to try and shape the "progress."
post #48 of 49
Thread Starter 
"Paradise can be a moving target. I was an urban pioneer in New York City in the 70's and 80's and as soon as we made virtually abandoned neighborhoods livable and "cool" landlords would raise the rents and gentrification set in. We couldn't afford to live in our own neighborhoods and moved to the next desolate place.. and so on."

I definitely can relate. During that time period, I was living on the Upper West Side of NYC. The East Siders thought it was a slum! I didn't care. My studio was $150 a month, rent stabilized. When I got married in 89, Mark and I lived there for a year. We were paying $300 a month rent, but the area was totally gentrified. However, the place was too small for the both of us. We moved uptown to 100th and West end, which was in fact, a slum, albeit a slum making a feeble attempt to gentrify. For $1150 a month, we were treated to an apartment the size of my studio. It had a wall in the middle, so it was called a one bedroom.

We pay less to own a 2 bed 2 bath in Summit County. Cost of living is relative. Not to mention the fact that I can walk my dog at night without getting harassed, and when I ride the bus I don't have to deal with panhandlers. They realize that if you're riding the bus, you're probably as poor as they are.
post #49 of 49
L.M.- Hey, I edited that history lesson part of my post, - man you're quick- but you see what I mean. If you can buy in, you're coverd and then sell when it suits you and move on. But being young and broke, that's no help.

This thread made me think about Alta- which is why I came to Utah in the first place. much of the Wasatch is BLM and Forest service land and the Cottonwood Canyons are untouchable for further development- except for the new lift, Alta is timeless and unspoiled. You'll never see a Big Sky or Deer Valley development there. Just a few small wooden lodges and 500+ inches of Utah champaign.
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