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Are poles poles? - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219
You can partially use the straps, by putting them over your forehand. To me, that's the safest compromise if you dont' have breakaway straps.
At first I read that as "forehead." Not helpful, but an interesting image.

Quote:
Another thing to keep in mind -- instead of firm pole plants, you only really need to tap the snow with your pole -- it's more for timing and form. You will really reduce the chance of wrist stress injuries by having gentle pole plants.
It sorta depends. In moguls, I tend to make some pretty firm pole plants from time to time.
post #32 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston
It sorta depends. In moguls, I tend to make some pretty firm pole plants from time to time.
I do too. Wish I didn't. Makes the skiing less fluid. If you watch WC bumps, their plants tend to be very quick and aggressively completed, but rarely do they have much "oomph" on them while planted, and even more rarely do they spend any appreciable amount of time in the snow. A "firm" pole plant would just slow them down. The bumps go by so quickly, usually my "firm" plants are the ones where I've screwed up a rhythm change. The pros really use it as a timing tool, just like the rest of us do on the groomed stuff.
post #33 of 53
I have used Goode's interlock system for the past 12 years. I love it. I have the regular and spring gloves.

i do like the thinness of the composite too. For those highspeed 60MPH runs, they have much less wind resistance. Also (mentioned) being bendy, IMO its good. especially on real hardpack, the bendyness allows much less jarring therefore less fatige.
post #34 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01
Had always thought this was the case too until last year when someone I skied with said she NEVER wrapped the strap, and in fact removed it from poles, because of hand / thumb injury risk, even if you are using strap correctly. So I stopped using the strap at all and after a few hours it seemed perfectly natural. Was this bit about hand/thumb injuries real or nonsense?
Real. I can now pop one of my thumbs in and out of joint because of the pole staying in my hand in a twisting fall with the strap on. Now, my buddies and I yell "Pole check!" when heading into tight trees and cliff areas, to make sure that no one is wearing their straps. Personally, I'd like to see some pole straps with safety releases. I've seen them, but they look too heavy and inconvenient.
post #35 of 53
The old allsop shock Absorbers had a releasable strap. Iit simply clipped into the upper grip. Worked great if you can find any!
post #36 of 53
I seem to recall that the old Kerma Equipe Olympic special circa 1988, (the one with the corrective angle that was a bright pink colour!!) had a breakaway strap. Must check in the garage, I 'm sure they're still there.
post #37 of 53
The proper way to hold a pole is with your hand through the strap and then under your thumb before you grip the pole.

Everyone is too concerned about hurting the thumb while falling. It doesn't matter. If the thumb is going to get hurt it will just as easy no matter how you hold it.

Who falls so much anyhow. I've only been down a few times in the past couple of years and that was in deep powder. It's tuff finding poles in deep powder so kep your straps on.
post #38 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
The proper way to hold a pole is with your hand through the strap and then under your thumb before you grip the pole.
Or, with straps flying in the wind, like me.

There is no "right" way to hold a pole, just like there is no "right" way to ski.
Quote:
Everyone is too concerned about hurting the thumb while falling. It doesn't matter. If the thumb is going to get hurt it will just as easy no matter how you hold it.
Yeah, I've hurt my thumb with no strap usage at all.

However, its likely that strap users suffer just as many or more thumb injuries, and they DEFINITELY suffer more shoulder injuries.
Quote:
Who falls so much anyhow. I've only been down a few times in the past couple of years and that was in deep powder. It's tuff finding poles in deep powder so kep your straps on.
Right.

Not falling doesn't imply technical prowess, it implies cautiousness.

Some of us actually like to ski hard and take calculated risks. See ya at the bottom.
-Garrett
post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219

Another thing to keep in mind -- instead of firm pole plants, you only really need to tap the snow with your pole -- it's more for timing and form.

Craig
Looks like someone hasn't learned to use their poles yet.
post #40 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheapseats
Looks like someone hasn't learned to use their poles yet.
Hah, what? That is how poles should be used....

Oh, and I use them as "feelers" in GS turns. And to push myself around. And to smack annoying people.
post #41 of 53
aaaand another pole-tapper.... Why bother with this useless, half-way jester to attempt to do something that needs to be done completely with commitment and conviction?

There aren't many activities in life where you move at such a fast rate with so little reference of the environment around you as skiing. Even skiers with incredible sight have just so much sensory overload trying to take in their speed and their body angle in relation to the ground, snow consistency, the general pitch of the slope, and how rough the surface is. They would be absolutely crazy not to want additional data input, and here you can get it from planting your pole - a momentarily fixed reference point that instantaneously gives tons of info. The 'tap' is just a waste of effort.

In steeps or undulating terrain or crud or pow, reaching forward for the plant is crucial for aggressive posture. Reaching forward for the 'tap' is like kissing yur sister.

Granted, you don't see it much in Downhill, Super-G or mogul comps, but speed events change a lot of things, and when it's not realistic, it's not.
post #42 of 53
I run my poles along the ground to the sides of my skis most of the time, for just the "reference" that you talk about. I see it in the video.

I make "real" pole plants in the woods, and sometimes the first turn into a tight chute or whatever.

How the heck would I make "real" pole plants out on the "groomers"? Heck, I can't JAM my pole into the snow half the time, let alone get it in there while cruising along at typical speed. Typical speed is somewhere between 15-35mph.
-Garrett
post #43 of 53
Thread Starter 
what about experiences with positive angle grips? worth it? not? doesn't matter?
post #44 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by what
what about experiences with positive angle grips? worth it? not? doesn't matter?
Last experience was about 10 years ago. I think its value would depend on the skier and their skiing style. I spend a lot of time close to the ground with my poles way out at the sides (I like long poles) so I guess it wouldn't make much difference for me.
-Garrett
post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by what
what about experiences with positive angle grips? worth it? not? doesn't matter?
"Positive Angle" means the shaft is a few degrees forward of vertical, in relation to the grip, right? Seems like a gimmicky compensation for poor technique, or perhaps an orthopedic device for someone with limited wrist mobility. Note the frequent references above to "aggressive" plants. The angulation compensator may be convenient for groomer flicking, but on the moguled steeps at the brink of control, give me a straight, strong shaft to lean on. What's that angle do to the compression forces, engineers? Mitigate or enhance? Would Koni "angulate" their shocks?

A more valuable technical feature for poles is adjustable length. I like to add a few centimeters on the steeps, so my pole plant isn't quite like a head-first dive off the 10 meter board, and shorten a few cm. on a climb. Lengthen again in bottomless powder, so your basket has more depth to accumulate pressure. Black Diamond's "flicklock" adjustment system is far more positive and reliable than the usual screw/wedge bushing.

As you can see by now, for most of us, a pole isn't just a pole.
post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Gill, I have both those and the Scott Taperlites, find the Scott Taperlites just as stiff and slightly lighter/faster. BTW, you know you can put the Leki pizza-plate 5" pow baskets on either one of those? The fold-down soft strap on the Leki pow baskets makes them much easier to pack than the grey Ice USA 3.5" baskets.
Comprex - Good info to know. Unfortunately, where I spend most of my ski days, I don't need to worry about powder baskets.
post #47 of 53
My friends and I have a tradition whenever we go out west. We bring our usual poles. Then we order pizza the night we get in. Then we fabricate powder baskets with pizza box and duct tape. They are suprisingly light and effective.

If they begin to fail midtrip, we simply order another pizza.
-Garrett
post #48 of 53
Garrett- I thought you were going to say you fabricated powder baskets with the leftover pizza. I suppose if you left it out on the porch overnight it would work.
post #49 of 53

Pole plant

Quick release sounds good to me. Last year I got a pole tangled crossing some orange snow fence to get at a huge bowl of fresh pow (be kind and don't call it poaching). Picture skis running forward while upper body snaps back with the pole firmly snared in the fence. I would have liked a release strap.
post #50 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manus
another good idea with carbon fibre (or any fiber based material) wrap the bottom with electrical tape. The tape will help prevent any major fraying of the fibers (typically from contact with the edge), and can also help prevent the pole from breaking.
When I was a student and couldn't afford poles I'd wrap them too.
Now I just use cheap aluminum poles. The edges nick them and eventually on some really cold day with hard but penetratable snow they snap at a nick. Seems to take a few seasons
post #51 of 53
Poles ...
post #52 of 53
poles-
look for din 7884 -Deutche international norm
and 7075 aluminium
higher tensile strength with reasonable weight.
Can't straighten them after bending like the cheaper softer grades
Gipron and Scott and Leki
most ski brand poles are made by Gipron in Italy
Paul
Whistler
post #53 of 53
Last season I got a pair of Scott world cups ('02-'03, red and blue) and they feel really good. My 92 year old mother still walks a couple of miles a day and in winter needs something for stability so I gave her my old Ramy French Equipe Nationale poles, she looks very competitive!
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