New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Passing through Canada

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
While on vacation we will be traveling through Canada on the way from western NY to Michigan.

What ID is required now days to drive straight through and back into the states?

We may have to modify the trip slightly if more than a drivers license is necessary.
post #2 of 26
Modify the trip now I guess. Although it's likely you won't be asked for any ID I believe if they ask they want to see a birth certificate. Maybe your (social security?) card combined with a license will do but I'd check first. Passport works of course.
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thats the reason for the question I have never had a passport and I can't locate my birth certificate.

I suppose we can drive around. Any others with a definitive answer?

Thank
post #4 of 26
You might get into Canada with just a driver's license and proof of residence, but you probably won't get back into the States. Something that shows proof of citizenship and nationality is needed along with proof of identity. Either get the passport if there's time before the trip, or it's unfortunately the long way around.
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j
We may have to modify the trip slightly if more than a drivers license is necessary.
Start modifying. A driver's license will get you there, but a passport or a birth certificate coupled with a picture id is required to return. My wife's sister found this out the hard way last summer.
post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 
Lesse, where the hell is Cleveland?

Isn't that a foreign country too?

Thanks folks,
post #7 of 26
I've driven that Buffalo to Windsor trip a gazillion times... still trying to figure out if it ultimately saves any time cutting through Ontario. The backups always occur coming back into the U.S.... especially at Detroit.

Your choice is: a long, straight ride through rural Ontario or a pungent drive through rust belt factories. I kinda liked the Charles Dickens aspect of Cleveland.
post #8 of 26
A passport would be good, just a drivers license would be insufficient. You should call the Canadian consulate, they could give you a definetive answer.
post #9 of 26
driver's license won't work. it doesn't prove citizenship.

they require either a certified copy of your birth certificate, or a US Passport.

whether a border agent lets you cross with less is another question. but remember, you need the proof for crossing in both directions, and it's unlikely that you will get a "pass" on both the going and coming trips. if you plan to complete the trip without hassle, I'd suggest getting one or the other of your Passport or Birth Certificate ready.

I'm going up to Vancouver BC in a few weeks and I had to send back to the tiny town of Newburyport MA for a fresh copy of my Birth Certificate. the last time I went into Canada I got by with just the driver's license, but they were VERY stern about "next time we won't let you through". I guess that's because they believed my honest statement to them that I thought a Driver's License showed citizenship. apparently you can be a non-US Citizen and get a Driver's License. I did not know that (Johnny Carson style).
post #10 of 26
Is there a reason people here don't have passports? They're really handy if you want to visit different countries.
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
I'm finding that out JD. I just never needed a passport before and I'm finding that where, exactly, I was born is pretty difficult for my 80 ish Y/O mom to remember. You need to know city and county---she remembers where they lived, but not where the hospital was.

Heck, I've been to Montreal many many times---but many years ago. Don't recall having any difficulty at all.

Now I'm just being cautious. Upon our return, I think I'll get one.
post #12 of 26
I'm about to get one, mainly because I'll be travelling to Central and South America this winter. I don't know if it will be ready fast enough for my trip to Vancouver though.

I've never had one before because I've never really spent any time or money toward travelling to a place where I'd need one. we're not all seasoned global travellers like you, james!
post #13 of 26
If Europe, eastern Canada (western Canada in March!), and a trip to Ensenada, Mexico constitute a seasoned global traveler...
post #14 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
I'm about to get one, mainly because I'll be travelling to Central and South America this winter. I don't know if it will be ready fast enough for my trip to Vancouver though.

I've never had one before because I've never really spent any time or money toward travelling to a place where I'd need one. we're not all seasoned global travellers like you, james!
My daughters boyfriend got an offfer to go build an arial tramway on the island of Dominica and needed a passport in a real hurry. My daughter and him went to Hartford, Ct. (some sort of regional office that offered the hurry up servide, not available everywhere) and got his in one day. I think it was marginally more expensive, but worth the few hour drive to get him on his way.

Maybe something like that is available for you, Gonz, if you really need it in a hurry.
post #15 of 26
For a US citizen native to the US (e.g. not naturalized), it used to be that a driver's license is sufficient to return from Canada. Nowadays, homeland security and all that made it much more rigorous.

If you are driving a US registered vehicle that belongs to you, getting into Canada is never a problem. I say I get asked for I.D. by the Canadian border folks about once every 20 times.

Coming back to stateside, showing of proper identification is more the rule than exception. The best i.d. is the passport. I've seen many showing th eir birth certificate. I would imagine in a pinch voter's registration, social security card as proof of legal US residency might suffice. Best people to call would be U.S. Immigration and Naturalization service. You can find them on the web by googling Home Security.
post #16 of 26
As long as you know what state you were born in, your mother's name and (helpful if you know father's as well) and the approximate date of your birth, you should have no problem quickly obtaining a certified copy of your birth certificate from your birth state's, state health department or comparable state vital statistic agency. For a payment of an additional fee you can expidite the processing of your passport application (you can double check if this policy is still applicable). It shouldn't take long to obtain either document in any event.
post #17 of 26

Pick up the Passport

As Homeland Security gets tighter and tighter, you will undoubtedly need a passport if you ever do pass through Canada and hope to return without unpleasant complications. On the other hand, having a passport means you'll be able to travel to all those wonderful Canadian ski hills, or perhaps take a trip to Europe.
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
Ordered a copy of my birth certificate just before the trip and it was in the mail when we returned.

First day we drove from southern VT to mid Michigan through Cleveland. It was over 800 miles---easily 100 extra I'll guess.

Now I need to find a passport processing place here.
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j
Now I need to find a passport processing place here.
There are online services available. They're hassle free but a little pricey. To me it was worth the 50 bucks to avoid taking care of it myself.
post #20 of 26
You must have had one before, Coach? This website says that if you have never had a passport before, you must get one in person. I have one, but it's expired, so I need to apply in person also.

http://travel.state.gov/passport/index.html

It's also $85, and lasts for 10 years. It takes up to 6 weeks to get it. We can get into Canada with birth certificates. I see no reason to get one just for that.
post #21 of 26
I cannot imagaine not having a passport! You never know when opportunity will arrive and you get to use it. Mine are the closest thing I have to a scrap book. I look at the dates and stamps and remember when I used to be a world traveller. Back in the day I had to get an extender for one.
post #22 of 26
How times change, eh Kima? Now it's difficult to go to Utah for an event. I know the feeling.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
How times change, eh Kima? Now it's difficult to go to Utah for an event. I know the feeling.
True, Bonni, true. Although I will be using mine in a couple of weeks. Once a year is rather sad
post #24 of 26
It is pricey to pay for expedited service ($60 extra) but if you can get the birth certificate many post offices have passport services windows where you can "apply in person"--just did it and paid for express mail/expedited service when mine was lost. They said two weeks and it took 8 days. They said they could do it faster if I had immediate travel plans.
post #25 of 26
Shave well and speak clearly or you might end up returning via Syria.
post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 
He he --Oz!

I am not terribly hirsute, but do need to repeat myself more often now - days!

Better get that passport toot-d-suite!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home